News Nuggets: Preview of Saturday’s Honorary Oscars for Jolie, Lansbury, Martin

Sandy Cohen previews this weekend’s Governors Awards from the motion picture academy. Tom Hanks and Anthony Hopkins will be among the presenters for a private, untelevised dinner. Oscar winner Angelina Jolie will receive the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, following in the footsteps of Quincy Jones, Jerry Lewis, Paul Newman, Elizabeth Taylor, and Oprah Winfrey. Three-time acting nominee Angela Lansbury, frequent ceremony host Steve Martin, and five-time nominated costume designer Piero Tosi will each receive an honorary statuette. Huffington Post.

Robert Bianco compares the recent rise in quality for “The Good Wife” with the decline of “Homeland“. He refers to the CBS legal show starring Julianna Margulies and Josh Charles as “the best drama on television at the moment, bar none.” He calls the Showtime thriller with Claire Danes and Damian Lewis “simpler and less intriguing” in its third season. USA Today.

John Oliver jumps ship from Comedy Central to HBO. The comedian had “an impressive stint” replacing Jon Stewart for several weeks this summer as host of “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.” His new satirical news/political program will debut on Sunday nights later in 2014. Oliver said, “I’m incredibly excited to be joining HBO, especially as I presume this means I get free HBO now.” Deadline.

Mark Harris, in a “momentary lull” while the country is “in the grip of Oscar fever,” offers an essay on the screenplay categories. He brings up the differences between the adapted and original fields and how it is sometimes difficult to decide where certain screenplays belong. One example is “The Butler,” which has been approved by the WGA as an original even though it is based on a newspaper article. Others in the conversation include “Before Midnight,” “Blue Jasmine,” and “Fruitvale Station.” Grantland.

Jenelle Riley offers that “no year in recent memory has seen so many prominent actors playing real people.” Always one of the easiest ways to win an Oscar, she provides a photo gallery and article about Daniel Bruhl (“Rush“), Leonardo DiCaprio (“The Wolf of Wall Street“), Chiwetel Ejiofor (“12 Years a Slave“), Tom Hanks (both “Captain Phillips” and “Saving Mr. Banks“), Matthew McConaughey (“Dallas Buyers Club“), and more. Variety.

Steve Pond reports that the American Society of Cinematographers will honor three men with lifetime achievement awards. Dean Cundey (“Apollo 13,” “Jurassic Park”), Eduardo Serra (“What Dreams May Come,” “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows”), and Richard Rawlings, Jr. (“Gilmore Girls,” “Desperate Housewives”) will receive their tributes on February 1. The Wrap.

Cast members from “Inside Llewyn Davis” bring down the house with performances from the new Joel and Ethan Coen film. Oscar Isaac, Milk Carton Kids, Punch Brothers, and even Steve Martin were on stage. Celebrities attending at Santa Monica’s Buffalo Club were John Goodman, Ed Helms, Barbra Streisand, Ted Danson, Mary Steenburgen, and Marisa Tomei. Awards Daily.

Could Ellen Burstyn be winning back-to-back Emmys? Lifetime provides a first look at their telefilm “Flowers in the Attic,” which will air on January 18. Based on the classic and controversial 1979 novel, the movie stars Burstyn, Kiernan Shipka, and Heather Graham. Entertainment Weekly.

One thought on “News Nuggets: Preview of Saturday’s Honorary Oscars for Jolie, Lansbury, Martin

  1. Mark Harris doesn’t understand how the WGA (and thus the Oscars) splits between “original” and “adapted”. It’s based on what was the official title of Adapted Screenplay before the Academy adopted its common name as the official one: If it’s “based on material previously produced or published”, it’s adapted; otherwise it’s original. The Butler may have been inspired by a newspaper article about Eugene Allen, but Danny Strong’s screenplay created new characters rather than follow Allen’s life exactly. (He also hasn’t heard the latest shocker: Disney is submitting Frozen as an original screenplay per its FYC site. Even though it’s clearly inspired by Hans Christian Andersen’s The Snow Queen — his name alone inspired the names of key characters Hans, Kristoff, and Anna — it’s enough different from Andersen that Disney isn’t even trying to hide it.)

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