BAFTA TV Awards snub ‘Downton Abbey’ yet again

This year’s BAFTA TV Awards nominations were drawn from programs that aired during the calendar year 2014. This continues the shift in the eligibilty period begun last year to line up with the film awards which have become an important precursor prize to the Oscars. While the film folk overhauled their nomination process, the TV side stayed the same. This produced some perplexing nominations and snubs. 

Downton Abbey” was completely blanked by the BAFTAs for the third year running. Back in 2012, this ITV drama reaped just one bid for the scene-stealing Maggie Smith.

Since then, it has won the SAG Awards ensemble prize twice and reaped three Emmy bids for Drama Series as well as 14 nominations for its series regulars. Will “Downton Abbey” make the cut for Best Drama Series at this year’s Emmys? Vote by clicking on the contenders in that category. 

Shut out for the second year running was “Mr. Selfridge,” another lavish period piece on ITV about a growing retail empire in turn of the 20th century Britain. 

Also ignored again were the BBC smash hits “Call the Midwife” and “Doctor Who.” 

BAFTA TV Awards: Complete list of nominations

How did these top-rated shows, which were also critically lauded, get left off the list of contenders?

The way in which BAFTA determines the nominees and winners lets too few decide too much. Add to that the lack of categories for performers and you are left with a lot of odd omissions.

The entire BAFTA membership, which numbers in the thousands, can vote for up to six programs or individuals per category. The top six vote getters in each category then go through to a second round of voting.

Then, according to the BAFTA guidelines, “each broadcaster has the opportunity to enter an additional program per category, per channel. In the case of terrestrial channels that have digital channels, the broadcaster can only choose one of their digital channels in which to put a program forward; this does not affect their right to enter their terrestrial channels.”

BAFTA TV Awards nominations led by ‘Happy Valley,’ ‘Line of Duty,’ ‘The Missing,’  

Thus, the second round of voting may have upwards of 10 further contenders per category supplementing the original six choices of BAFTA members.

Voting in this second round is restricted to juries of just nine members who view the chosen tapes and whittle the entries down to four nominees before choosing a winner. It is possible that many of these nominees and even winners could be the secondary submissions of broadcasters rather than the primary picks of BAFTA voters. 

As per BAFTA, “each jury aims to be balanced in age, sex, experience, ethnicity and in broadcasting allegiances, with a track record of achievement in the genre and with no direct association with a short-listed programme. It must also comprise a mix of related skills such as writers, producers, directors, actors.”

With only four programs nominated per category, the odds of reaping bids are long. And they get even more remote for performers. While there are separate awards for one-off telefilms, miniseries (defined as two to five episodes) and drama series (six to 19 installments), all the performances across these genres are pitted against each other to fight for four slots for each of lead and supporting actor and actress. 

Even worse, there are no supporting awards on the comedy side and none at all given for performers in continuing dramas such as “Coronation Street” and “Eastenders” which are mainstays of the ITV and BBC primetime schedules respectively with five episodes per week drawing upwards of 10 million viewers.

Do you think “Downton Abbey” will make the cut at the Emmys for Best Drama Series? Make your Emmys picks now — click here — or scroll down to predict the Best Drama Series line-up using our easy drag-and-drop menu. Best predictions will win $1,000. And the 24 Users with the best scores advance to a team to compete against our Experts and Editors next year. Meet the guy who won our contest to predict the Emmys last year — and learn how he did it and how you can be our next Gold Derby superstar. See contest rules.

Average Gold Derby users just like YOU often turn out to be our smartest prognosticators, so it’s important that you give us your predictions. Your picks influence our User racetrack odds, which also factor into our official combined odds. The Top 24 Users did the best at predicting last year’s Emmy nominations (78.55%) when competing against Gold Derby’s Editors (77.68%), all Users (74.78%) and the Experts (74.64%). Which group will come out victorious this year?

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4 thoughts on “BAFTA TV Awards snub ‘Downton Abbey’ yet again

  1. This all serves to explain why BAFTA barely goes mainstream. If anything the nature of BAFTA TV isn’t entirely dissimilar to GG. The only time BAFTA goes mainstream is when a show is near the end of its run or a snub is heinous, hence Cumberbatch, who will now probably win much like the popular comedy series the IT Crowd winning last year in acting in its one off episode to close the series.

    Also dear America get over Downton Abbey! Seriously. There is far far richer content coming out of this country than that. FYC: Happy Valley, The Last Tango in Halifax, Indian Summers, Peaky Blinders, Wolf Hall, The Fall.

  2. Looks like they have finally gotten over Broadchurch, not a single nomination apart from Olivia Colman in Rev (they love her so much). Also looks like The Good Wife is finally going to get the international recognition it deserves! 😀

  3. Series 2 of “Broadchurch” was not eligible as it aired in the early part of 2015; these nominations are for 2014 programming. Having said that, there is a slew of critically acclaimed fare (that also happens to be popular) that was snubbed, including “Downton Abbey,” “Dr. Who” and “Call the Midwife.”

  4. The Bafta TV drama has only four nominees in the four categories performance and includes series, miniseries and TV movies which explains many absences. They are not big fans of popular series and ignore American actors when they make TV.

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