EW’s The 100 Greatest Novels Ever

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  • Profile photo of Keith24Emmy
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    #450097

    The 100 Greatest Novels Ever
    1. Anna Karenina (By Leo Tolstoy — 1878)
    2. The Great Gatsby (By F. Scott Fitzgerald — 1925)
    3. Pride and Prejudice (By Jane Austen — 1813)
    4. Great Expectations (By Charles Dickens — 1861)
    5. One Hundred Years of Solitude (By Gabriel Garcia Marquez — 1967)
    6. My Antonia (By Willa Cather — 1918)
    7. The Harry Potter series (By J.K. Rowling — 1997-2007)
    8. The Rabbit quartet (By John Updike — 1960-1990)
    9. Beloved (By Toni Morrison — 1987)
    10. Charlotte’s Web (By E.B. White — 1952)
    11. Mrs. Dalloway (By Virginia Woolf — 1925)
    12. The Sound and the Fury (By William Faulkner — 1929)
    13. To Kill a Mockingbird (By Harper Lee — 1960)
    14. Crime and Punishment (By Fyodor Dostoevsky — 1867)
    15. Ragtime (By E.L. Doctorow — 1975)
    16. Jane Eyre (By Charlotte Bronte — 1847)
    17. The Road (By Cormac McCarthy — 2006)
    18. Moby-Dick (By Herman Melville — 1851)
    19. Lolita (By Vladimir Nabokov — 1955)
    20. Lonesome Dove (By Larry McMurtry — 1985)
    21. An American Tragedy (By Theodore Dreiser — 1925)
    22. Wuthering Heights (By Emily Bronte — 1847)
    23. The Brothers Karamazov (By Fyodor Dostoevsky — 1880)
    24. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (By James Joyce — 1916)
    25. Bleak House (By Charles Dickens — 1853)
    26. Invisible Man (By Ralph Ellison — 1952)
    27. A Wrinkle in Time (By Madeleine L’Engle — 1962)
    28. War and Peace (By Leo Tolstoy — 1869)
    29. The Handmaid’s Tale (By Margaret Atwood — 1986)
    30. Native Son (By Richard Wright — 1940)
    31. Blindness (By Jose Saramago — 1995)
    32. The Catcher in the Rye (By J.D. Salinger — 1951)
    33. Maus (By Art Spiegelman — 1986)
    34. The World According to Garp (By John Irving — 1978)
    35. A Personal Matter (By Kenzaburo Oe — 1964)
    36. Atlas Shrugged (By Ayn Rand — 1957)
    37. The Sun Also Rises (By Ernest Hemingway — 1926)
    38. The Regeneration trilogy (By Pat Barker — 1991-1995)
    39. Middlesex (By Jeffrey Eugenides — 2002)
    40. A Suitable Boy (By Vikram Seth — 1993)
    41. Go Tell It on The Mountain (By James Baldwin — 1953)
    42. The Stand (By Stephen King — 1978)
    43. A Confederacy of Dunces (By John Kennedy Toole — 1980)
    44. His Dark Materials (By Philip Pullman — 1995-2000)
    45. The Color Purple (By Alice Walker — 1982)
    46. The Age of Innocence (By Edith Wharton — 1920)
    47. The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle (By Haruki Murakami — 1994)
    48. The Talented Mr. Ripley (By Patricia Highsmith — 1955)
    49. Ender’s Game (By Orson Scott Card — 1985)
    50. Snow (By Orhan Pamuk — 2002)
    51. The Corrections (By Jonathan Franzen — 2001)
    52. Song of Solomon (By Toni Morrison — 1977)
    53. Gone With the Wind (By Margaret Mitchell — 1936)
    54. Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk (By Ben Fountain — 2012)
    55. A Fine Balance (By Rohinton Mistry — 1995)
    56. Sophie’s Choice (By William Styron — 1979)
    57. The Children of Men (By P.D. James — 1992)
    58. Midnight’s Children (By Salman Rushdie — 1981)
    59. Dracula (By Bram Stoker — 1897)
    60. Their Eyes Were Watching God (By Zora Neale Hurston — 1937)
    61. Love in the Time of Cholera (By Gabriel Garcia Marquez — 1988)
    62. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (By Mark Twain — 1884)
    63. Portnoy’s Complaint (By Philip Roth — 1969)
    64. Infinite Jest (By David Foster Wallace — 1996)
    65. Herzog (By Saul Bellow — 1964)
    66. Howards End (By E.M. Forster — 1910)
    67. The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay (By Michael Chabon — 2000)
    68. Middlemarch (By George Eliot — 1874)
    69. Money (By Martin Amis — 1985)
    70. Neuromancer (By William Gibson — 1984)
    71. The Hobbit (By J.R.R. Tolkien — 1937)
    72. The Remains of the Day (By Kazuo Ishiguro — 1989)
    73. The Spy Who Came in From the Cold (By John le Carre — 1963)
    74. Cold Mountain (By Charles Frazier — 1997)
    75. Madame Bovary (By Gustave Flaubert — 1857)
    76. The Golden Notebook (By Doris Lessing — 1962)
    77. Tom Jones (By Henry Fielding — 1749)
    78. A House for Mr. Biswas (By V.S. Naipaul — 1961)
    79. Bring Up the Bodies (By Hilary Mantel — 2012)
    80. Swann’s Way (By Marcel Proust — 1913)
    81. Frankenstein (By Mary Shelley — 1818)
    82. Disgrace (By J.M. Coetzee — 1999)
    83. The Stone Diaries (By Carol Shields — 1993)
    84. Clockers (By Richard Price — 1992)
    85. Catch-22 (By James Heller — 1961)
    86. A Home at the End of the World (By Michael Cunningham — 1990)
    87. White Teeth (By Zadie Smith — 2000)
    88. The Bonfire of the Vanities (By Tom Wolfe — 1987)
    89. Tristram Shandy (By Laurence Sterne — 1895)
    90. The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter (By Carson McCullers — 1940)
    91. The Leopard (By Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa — 1958)
    92. The Glass Bead Game (By Hermann Hesse — 1943)
    93. Bastard Out of Carolina (By Dorothy Allison — 1992)
    94. The Moonstone (By Wilkie Collins — 1868)
    95. The Poisonwood Bible (By Barbara Kingsolver — 1998)
    96. If on a Winter’s Night a Traveler (By Italo Calvino — 1979)
    97. The Big Sleep (By Raymond Chandler — 1939)
    98. Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret (By Judy Blume — 1970)
    99. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (By Douglas Adams — 1979)
    100. The Joy Luck Club (By Amy Tan — 1989)

    There’s also four top 10 lists:

    The 10 Greatest Graphic Novels
    1. Maus (By Art Spiegelman — 1986)
    2. The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn (By Herge — 1943)
    3. Fun Home (By Alison Bechdel — 2006)
    4. Sandman (By Neil Gaiman — 1989)
    5. Watchmen (By Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons — 1986)
    6. Chicken With Plums (By Marjane Satrapi — 2004)
    7. Blankets (By Craig Thompson — 2003)
    8. Mendel’s Daughter (By Martin Lemelman — 2006)
    9. Stitches (By David Small — 2009)
    10. Y: The Last Man (By Brian K. Vaughan and Pia Guerra — 2002)

    The 10 Greatest Short-Story Collections
    1. Everthing That Rises Must Converge (By Flannery O’Connor — 1965)
    2. Open Secrets (By Alice Munro — 1994)
    3. The Stories of John Cheever (1978)
    4. Collected Fictions (By Jorge Luis Borges — 1998)
    5. The Lottery and Other Stories (By Shirley Jackson — 1949)
    6. Interpreter of Maladies (By Jhumpa Lahiri — 1999)
    7. Where I’m Calling From (By Raymond Carver — 1988)
    8. The Turn of the Screw and Other Short Novels (By Henry James — 1962)
    9. Pastoralia (By George Saunders — 2001)
    10. Nine Stories (By J.D. Salinger — 1953)

    The 10 Greatest Mysteries and Thrillers
    1. The Spy Who Came in From the Cold (By John Le Carre — 1963)
    2. The Moonstone (By Wilkie Collins — 1868)
    3. The Big Sleep (By Raymond Chandler — 1939)
    4. The Skull Beneath the Skin (By P.D. James — 1982)
    5. The Fifth Woman (By Henning Mankell — 1996)
    6. A Great Deliverance (By Elizabeth George — 1988)
    7. Drood (By Dan Simmons — 2009)
    8. The Black Echo (By Michael Connelly — 1992)
    9. Rebecca (By Daphne Du Maurier — 1938)
    10. Presumed Innocent (By Scott Turow — 1987)

    The 10 Greatest Hollywood Tell-Alls
    1. How to Talk Dirty and Influence People (By Lenny Bruce — 1965)
    2. By Myself (By Lauren Bacall — 1978)
    3. The Kid Stays in the Picture (By Robert Evans — 1994)
    4. Me: Stories of My Life (By Katharine Hepburn — 1991)
    5. The Way  We Lived Then: Recollections of a Well-Known Name Dropper (By Dominick Dunne — 1999)
    6. Born Standing Up (By Steve Martin — 2007)
    7. We Will Always Live in Beverly Hills (By Ned Wynn — 1990)
    8. You’ll Never Eat Lunch in This Town Again (By Julia Phillips — 1991)
    9. My Lucky Stars (By Shirley MacLaine — 1995)
    10. Haywire (By Brooke Hayward — 1977)

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    Profile photo of Renato MirandaRenaton
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    #450099

    Harry Potter at 7th? Sure, it’s EW, but come on…

     

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    Profile photo of AtypicalAtypical
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    #450100

    “Harry Potter” above “Beloved”? Have a seat with that. NEXT!

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    Profile photo of vincentvinny
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    #450101

    So gald to see Harry Potter that high (I love those books so I’m happy) but Gatsby should be number one.

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    Profile photo of Nick Brovendernkb325
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    #450102

    Agreed some people may not love Harry Potter but its a fact that most people in my generation (I’m 20) love them and it’s one of the top selling series of all time, so clearly at least some people think they deserve to be that high or higher.

    I’m also kind of surprised there isn’t a single Agatha Christie book on the top ten mysteries list. I mean she’s “The Queen of Crime” and the highest selling novelist of all time, you’d think she’d at least get one book on there. Most of these books are more recent like the oldest one is from the 60’s I get it but she certainly has some books that have stood the test of time. At least her most famous one, And Then There Were None could have made it up there. I mean it’s the best selling mystery novel of all time I can’t be the only person under the age of 50 who’s read and loved And Then There Were None.

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    Profile photo of vincentvinny
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    #450103

    Agreed some people may not love Harry Potter but its a fact that most people in my generation (I’m 20) love them and it’s one of the top selling series of all time, so clearly at least some people think they deserve to be that high or higher.

    I’m also kind of surprised there isn’t a single Agatha Christie book on the top ten mysteries list. I mean she’s “The Queen of Crime” and the highest selling novelist of all time, you’d think she’d at least get one book on there. Most of these books are more recent like the oldest one is from the 60’s I get it but she certainly has some books that have stood the test of time. At least her most famous one, And Then There Were None could have made it up there. I mean it’s the best selling mystery novel of all time I can’t be the only person under the age of 50 who’s read and loved And Then There Were None.

    I’ve read it. Didn’t love it though. I liked A Caribbean Mystery better.   

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    Profile photo of Renato MirandaRenaton
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    #450104

    Harry Potter should NOT be this higher or higher just because of sales and because it was big with a generation. The fact you have it above, for example, the two Dostoyevski novels (Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov) is already completely ridiculous, and shows you can’t take this list seriously.

    I understand fans are happy, but Harry Potter will never be higher than some of the greatest authors of all time with their most representative classics. But again, this is expected, but after all, it’s EW, which isn’t exactly where you go for literature.

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    Profile photo of Keith24Emmy
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    #450105

    Harry Potter should NOT be this higher or higher just because of sales and because it was big with a generation. The fact you have it above, for example, the two Dostoyevski novels (Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov) is already completely ridiculous, and shows you can’t take this list seriously.

    I understand fans are happy, but Harry Potter will never be higher than some of the greatest authors of all time with their most representative classics. But again, this is expected, but after all, it’s EW, which isn’t exactly where you go for literature.

    This is what it says about Harry Potter in the magazine:

    Surprised to see Harry so high on our list? Well, his is the richest coming-of-age tale ever. Thanks to Rowling’s luminous story telling and dazzling imagination, people will still be tearing through it in a hundred years.

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    Profile photo of ladyhathorladyhathor
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    #450106

    Well, I tried to respond and GoldDerby logged me out.  I have the hardest time logging in on this site.

    Trying again:

    While I can understand an argument to place the Harry Potter series on this, my initial quibble is that it is ranked far, FAR too high.  I personally really like the Harry Potter books.  I’ve never tried to rank my favorite 100 novels, but I’d at least give them some consideration.  However, there is simply no way the entirety of the Harry Potter series is better than Fyodor Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov.  Ridiculous.

    Truly Karamazov is ranked ludicrously low. Are they really prepared to defend the idea that My Antonia is a better novel? There are at least 10 novels in between Karamazov and the top of the list which I would not hesitate to swap with it (including Dostoevsky’s other listed novel), or even remove altogether.  And that doesn’t include the 4 or 5 between it and the top which I have yet to read.  Basically, Karamazov would have no trouble placing in my top 3.  And would have a shot at my personal #1.  I like it a LOT more than Anna Karenina, even though that would also likely make my personal list.

    Did EW have a cutoff in time? Because notably missing is Don Quixote.

    One thing I do like about this list is that it is bit less American-centric than most American published lists. Particularly nice to see a fair number of non-English language novels on this list.  Not just from Dostoevsky, but also Tolstoy, Proust, Garcia Marquez, Saramago, Pamuk, Oe, Murakami, Calvino…  (Though, if the entire Harry Potter series is counted as 1 novel, why not Proust’s In Search of Lost Time, which is tradiationally thought of as one novel published in multiple volumes?)  I searched for an American-based 100 greatest novels list a few years ago didn’t come up with anything interesting.  It was all very American centric.  This is why the list I am currently working from is the one published in the Observer/Guardian.  It is VERY interesting, including a lot of fun and unique novels.  (Which is too British-centric and also includes some duds, but nothing is perfect.)

    More quibbles: I just read Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk.  It is a good book.  I promise it is not one of the 100 greatest novels ever. I have no problem with placing newer novels on lists like these.  Have no trouble with listing The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle.  I’d likely list Junot Diaz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. I can definitely understand listing Cormac McCarthy’s The Road. I just would never consider listing this particular novel.

    Also, I think it is obvious that EW is confusing books for movies in a lot of these cases.  Neither Sophie’s Choice nor The Children of Men are great novels.  They belong nowhere near a “100 Greatest Novels” list. Really, I’m not even sure either of them is particularly good. Seing them both ranked above Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children makes me cringe. Cold Mountain is a decent novel, but also doesn’t belong on a list like this.  I’m guessing by the inclusion of these books that some people on EW’s staff don’t read books unless there is a movie based on them.

    My final intitial thought is that EW has a solid short story collection list.  I’m particularly grateful to them for remembering to list Jorge Luis Borges.

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    Profile photo of ladyhathorladyhathor
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    #450107

    I’m also kind of surprised there isn’t a single Agatha Christie book on the top ten mysteries list. I mean she’s “The Queen of Crime” and the highest selling novelist of all time, you’d think she’d at least get one book on there. Most of these books are more recent like the oldest one is from the 60’s I get it but she certainly has some books that have stood the test of time. At least her most famous one, And Then There Were None could have made it up there. I mean it’s the best selling mystery novel of all time I can’t be the only person under the age of 50 who’s read and loved And Then There Were None.

    The Mystery list is a bit of a mess.  Although, there are definitely books on it which were published prior to the 60s.  Or maybe you didn’t realize The Moonstone was published in the Eighteen-sixties?  LOL. And truthfully, I think I slightly prefer Wilkie Collins’ The Woman in White to The Moonstone.  Though, both are really good. And you should all read both of them.

    Also, Raymond Chandler’s The Big Sleep is from the 30s.  So is Du Maurier’s Rebecca.

    I do think Agatha Christie could have been placed on this list with little complaint. Though, And Then There Were None wouldn’t have been my selection. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd would have been a reasonable inclusion, due to the crazy, influential twist ending. I could have also defended Murder on the Orient Express for being so famous and such a great example of Christie’s style.

    I would have removed Drood and The Black Echo (though I do like Michael Connelly) to put in a Christie novel and also Dashiell Hammett’s Red Harvest.

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    Profile photo of Nick Brovendernkb325
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    #450108

    [quote=”nkb325″]I’m also kind of surprised there isn’t a single Agatha Christie book on the top ten mysteries list. I mean she’s “The Queen of Crime” and the highest selling novelist of all time, you’d think she’d at least get one book on there. Most of these books are more recent like the oldest one is from the 60’s I get it but she certainly has some books that have stood the test of time. At least her most famous one, And Then There Were None could have made it up there. I mean it’s the best selling mystery novel of all time I can’t be the only person under the age of 50 who’s read and loved And Then There Were None.

    The Mystery list is a bit of a mess.  Although, there are definitely books on it which were published prior to the 60s.  Or maybe you didn’t realize The Moonstone was published in the Eighteen-sixties?  LOL. And truthfully, I think I slightly prefer Wilkie Collins’ The Woman in White to The Moonstone.  Though, both are really good. And you should all read both of them.

    Also, Raymond Chandler’s The Big Sleep is from the 30s.  So is Du Maurier’s Rebecca.

    I do think Agatha Christie could have been placed on this list with little complaint. Though, And Then There Were None wouldn’t have been my selection. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd would have been a reasonable inclusion, due to the crazy, influential twist ending. I could have also defended Murder on the Orient Express for being so famous and such a great example of Christie’s style.

    I would have removed Drood and The Black Echo (though I do like Michael Connelly) to put in a Christie novel and also Dashiell Hammett’s Red Harvest.[/quote]

    You’re right when i made that comment I was accidentally looking at the years for the hollywood tell-all section my mistake.

    And I didn’t necessarily mean And Then There Were None was her best i just figured since it’s her most famous it would be most likely to make the list if one was going to.  Murder on the Orient Express and Crooked House are probably my own personal favorites. I mainly just meant that I’m surprised hat probably one of the most if not the most iconic mystery writers didn’t get a single book on the list but that could just be me. When i saw they had a mystery section my first thought was honestly I wonder which Christie book is on here, i just assumed there would be at least one

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    Profile photo of ladyhathorladyhathor
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    #450109

    You’re right when i made that comment I was accidentally looking at the years for the hollywood tell-all section my mistake.

    And I didn’t necessarily mean And Then There Were None was her best i just figured since it’s her most famous it would be most likely to make the list if one was going to.  Murder on the Orient Express and Crooked House are probably my own personal favorites. I mainly just meant that I’m surprised hat probably one of the most if not the most iconic mystery writers didn’t get a single book on the list but that could just be me. When i saw they had a mystery section my first thought was honestly I wonder which Christie book is on here, i just assumed there would be at least one

    Ah, that explains it. LOL.

    I’ve now looked at the Mysteries list again, and it just seems so strange to me. I must conclude that whoever contributed to it is not very well read in mysteries.  I, however, read a TON of mysteries and thrillers.  I mean, I can’t argue too much with The Spy Who Came In From the Cold, The Moonstone and The Big Sleep. But, I don’t think anything else on their list would make even a top 20 for me.  Maybe not even a top 40, to be honest.  PD James and Elizabeth George are not my thing.  And I’ve actually read those two books!  Are they saying both are better than Dashiell Hammett’s Red Harvest? Really?

    And I really like Michael Connelly, but I am not sure any of his books are really top 10 of All Time kind of material.  I like Henning Mankell even more, but still…. Really?  Top 10 of All Time?

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