MARIJUANA *finally* completely legal in two states (and counting)!

Home // Forums // General Discussion // MARIJUANA *finally* completely legal in two states (and counting)!

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
Created
5 years ago
Last Reply
5 years ago
9
( +1 hidden )
replies
736
views
4
users
4
3
1
  • Anonymous
    Joined:
    Jan 1st, 1970
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #445233

    Colorado, Washington Legalize Recreational Marijuana

    By ALBERT SABATÉ
    Nov. 7, 2012

     

     

    Colorado and Washington passed referendums legalizing marijuana for recreational use, becoming the first states in the country to legalize the drug, according to ABC News.

    ABC News projects that a similar measure in Oregon failed to garner enough support to pass.

    The initiatives would allow marijuana to be cultivated and for special stores to sell up to an ounce to individuals 21 and older.

    In Colorado specifically, the Amendment 64 makes changes to state law to allow for commercial production and sale. Newsweek reported that business – including big tobacco – has been gearing up for the change.

    “It’s unprecedented,” Jonathan Caulkins, a Carnegie Mellon University professor, told The Denver Post. He said the change would put Colorado to the left of the Netherlands when it comes to marijuana policy.

    It could also impact Mexico.

    A report found that legalizing marijuana would cut the cartels’ income by $1.37 billion, or 23 percent of its $6 billion in sales in the United States. Legalization in Colorado potentially represents a similar decline.

    “I think it’s a good step,” said Brandon Romney, Mitt Romney’s third cousin who lives in Mexico near the U.S.-Mexico border. “Eventually the U.S. and Mexico will have to move toward decriminalization. So, better sooner than later.”

    In Massachusetts, voters approved a ballot measure to allow medical marijuana use for patients suffering from debilitating medical conditions like cancer or Parkinson’s disease. Massachusetts became the 18th state to legalize it – joining Colorado, Washington, Oregon, and the District of Columbia.

    Arkansas also voted on whether to authorize marijuana for medical uses. However, early results indicate it is unlikely to pass.

    Both laws in Colorado and Washington represent a challenge to federal law, which considers it as a Schedule 1 drug – its strictest classification. It is unclear what will be the federal governments reaction.

    In one scenario, according to reporting by the Huffington Post, “even that financial win for Colorado could disappear if Congress decided to ‘punish’ Colorado by withholding federal highway funds.”

    http://abcnews.go.com/ABC_Univision/News/colorado-washington-legalize-recreational-marijuana/story?id=17656515#.UJocb2_O2So

    Colorado, Washington approve recreational marijuana use

    By Allison Linn, NBC News

    Voters in Colorado and Washington on Tuesday approved measures allowing adults to use marijuana for any purpose, NBC News projected, marking an historic turning point in the slow-growing acceptance of marijuana usage.

    In Massachusetts, voters also approved an initiative allowing people to use marijuana for medicinal purposes, NBC News projected. In Arkansas, a similar initiative failed, according to NBC News projections.

    In all, voters in six states were being asked to decide on a wide array of laws around legalizing marijuana for medicinal or recreational purposes.

    In three of those states – Colorado, Oregon and Washington – voters were deciding whether to allow people over 21 to use marijuana for any purpose. In Oregon, NBC News projected that the initiative to legalize marijuana had failed.

    In Montana, NBC News projected that voters had approved a plan to to revamp an existing medicinal marijuana law to make it more restrictive.

    The laws legalizing marijuana for recreational or other purposes could face federal challenges, because marijuana possession is still a federal crime. But so far, the Justice Department has declined to discuss how it might react if the laws pass. Late Tuesday, a spokesman said in an e-mail that they were reviewing the Colorado initiative and had no immediate comment.

    Proponents say it’s about time pot was made legal and that it would create new avenues of tax revenue. But opponents say legalization would lead to more drug abuse and concerns about things like driving while impaired.

    Opponent Kevin Sabet, a former senior advisor to the Obama administration and an assistant professor at the University of Florida’s college of medicine, said he was expecting legal challenges at the state and federal level.

    “This is just the beginning of the legalization conversation, so my advice to people who want to toke up legally or think that they can buy marijuana at a store tomorrow is that we’re a very long way from (that),” Sabet said.

    Proponents of the legislation also said they expected some legal wrangling.

    “It sets up a clear and obvious challenge with the federal government,” said Allen St. Pierre, executive director of NORML, which has fought for years to legalize cannabis.

    But proponents also were celebrating what they saw as a turning point in a long-running battle to make marijuana more available to the general public.

    “We are reaching a real tipping point with cannabis law reform,” said Steve DeAngelo, a longtime advocate for legalizing marijuana and the director of the nation’s largest medical cannbabis dispensary, Harborside Health Center in Oakland, Calif.

    Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper acknowledged legal challenges but said the state would work to resolve the conflict between federal and state laws.

    “It’s probably going to pass, but it’s still illegal on a federal basis. If we can’t make it legal here because of federal laws, we certainly want to decriminialize it,” he told NBC’s Brian Williams.

    Seventeen states and the District of Columbia already have laws allowing for the medical use of marijuana, according to the National Council of Legislatures.

    The initiatives in Washington, Oregon and Colorado would take things one step further, explicitly allowing people to smoke pot for more than just medicinal purposes.

    The idea of legalizing marijuana has gained acceptance in recent years. A Gallup poll released in October of 2011 found that 50 percent of Americans now favor legalizing pot. A decade ago, only around 34 percent were in favor. Liberals and adults under 29 are the most likely to approve of legalizing use of the drug.

    Here’s a look at the states considering marijuana laws Tuesday.

    Arkansas: Voters in Arkansas will consider whether to legalize marijuana for medical purposes.

    Colorado: Voters in Colorado are being asked to approve a bill that would allow people 21 and over to possess and use a small amount of marijuana for recreational purposes. A similar measure was defeated in 2006.

    Massachusetts: Voters in Massachusetts are being asked to vote on whether it’s OK to legalize marijuana for medical purposes.

    Montana: In 2004, voters in Montana approved a law allowing marijuana for medical purposes. Then, in 2011, the legislature approved replacing it with a new, more restrictive one. Voters on Tuesday will decide whether to allow those restrictions to be upheld.

    Oregon: Voters in Oregon are being asked to decide whether to legalize marijuana use for people who are 21 years or older, and to tax and regulate it in the same way as alcohol.

    Washington: The Washington bill would allow people over age 21 to possess a small amount of pot for personal use. 

    http://nbcpolitics.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/11/06/14977250-colorado-washington-approve-recreational-marijuana-use?lite 

     

    Reply
    Anonymous
    Joined:
    Jan 1st, 1970
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #445235

    And the movement spreads further, with an 18th state approving Marijuana for medicinal use:
    http://www.boston.com/metrodesk/2012/11/06/massachusetts-voters-approve-ballot-measure-legalize-medical-marijuana/EpDzgJGfBjnOAkoXpJwm1K/story.html

    Massachusetts voters approve ballot measure to legalize medical marijuana
    E-mail | Print | Comments ( 0)11/06/2012 10:34 PM

    •  2913
    •  11
    •  

    •  25.9K
    • E-mail

     

    By Chelsea Conaboy, Globe Staff

     

    People with debilitating medical conditions and permission from their doctors will be able to buy marijuana from state-sanctioned distribution centers starting next year. Voters overwhelmingly approved a ballot question that makes Massachusetts the 18th state to legalize medical marijuana. With 49 percent of the vote counted, 63 percent had voted in favor of the measure, 37 percent against it.

    While opponents of the law warned that its passage could increase recreational use of marijuana, especially among teens, members of the Committee for Compassionate Medicine lauded the vote as a win for patients who have been waiting for legal access to a drug thought to relieve pain and muscle stiffness associated with certain chronic conditions.

    Eric McCoy, 59, of Boston, who said he has multiple sclerosis and has used marijuana medically for 17 years expressed relief that voters had supported the measure.

    “Now that this law has been passed, it will finally be legal and safe for myself and many others in the state to procure the medicine,” he said.

    All New England states but New Hampshire now have legalized medical marijuana in some form.

    The ballot effort was funded in large part by Peter Lewis, chairman of the Progressive insurance company, who has said he supports lifting the ban on marijuana.

    Under the Massachusetts law, patients with HIV, multiple sclerosis, hepatitis C, or other conditions can obtain a card from the state permitting them to purchase the drug and will be allowed to possess a 60-day supply. They also may appoint a caregiver to obtain the drug on their behalf.

    The Department of Public Health is charged writing the rules within about four months to fully implement the law, within the framework outlined on the ballot, and registering at least one nonprofit distribution center in each county, with up to 35 allowed in 2013.

    Kelly Sielis, 21, a Boston University student and first-time voter said she has watched her mother deal with anxiety as she undergoes cancer treatment and believes some patients might reasonably look to marijuana as “a more natural alternative” to other medications.

    “I think the illegalization of marijuana is outdated,” Sielis said.

    Some saw the initiative as a veiled step toward full legalization of the drug.

    “We just opened our door to a billion dollar industry that can capitalize on anyone with pain and our young people,” said Heidi Heilman, president of the Massachusetts Prevention Society. Opponents, she said, did not have the money to fight the ballot initiative effectively.

    The Massachusetts Medical Society, the state’s largest physician group, opposed the proposal, saying large clinical trials and federal regulators — not popular opinion — should determine whether marijuana has therapeutic value. But supporters of the state law say the typical drug approval process has been thwarted by federal drug policy.

    Other opponents worried that the law could lead to more recreational marijuana use among teens, who may believe the drug is safe once it is labeled as medicine, and they warned that marijuana produced in state-sanctioned facilities could be diverted to the black market, as has happened in other states.

    Molly O’Connell, 33, said she went back and forth on the ballot question and ultimately decided to vote against it when she cast her ballot at Duxbury Middle School Tuesday. She worried about the policy’s impact on teens.

    “I teach high school, and I see how readily available marijuana is now,” she said.

    Abuse of the law to sell marijuana for non-medical purposes will be considered a felony punishable with up to five years in state prison

     

     

     

     

     

    Globe correspondents Jessica Bartlett and Matt Rocheleau contributed to this story. Chelsea Conaboy can be reached at cconaboy@boston.com. Follow her on Twitter@cconaboy 

    ReplyCopy URL
    dannyboy.
    Participant
    Joined:
    Oct 11th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #445236

    Its absurd that pot is illegal when alcohol and cigarettes do SO MUCH MORE HARM to your health. Let alone the amount of money the state and/or federal governments could make taxing it and hopefully put to some good use. It was a good day to be a liberal.

    ReplyCopy URL
    babypook
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 4th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #445237

    Whoa I was smoking a joint, or I may have noticed this thread sooner. I reported this in the political thread,

    The only drawback I see to legalization is reduced potency, and Monsanto. Also, people will get better, their health will improve, it will ease pain and suffering, and it’s organic, which means NO PATENT, where the real money is. And that, will be fought by BigPharma.

    Lol. Time to finish my roach.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Anonymous
    Joined:
    Jan 1st, 1970
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #445238

    Its absurd that pot is illegal when alcohol and cigarettes do SO MUCH MORE HARM to your health. Let alone the amount of money the state and/or federal governments could make taxing it and hopefully put to some good use. It was a good day to be a liberal.

    Preach it, sister. 

    Whoa I was smoking a joint, or I may have noticed this thread sooner. I reported this in the political thread,

    The only drawback I see to legalization is reduced potency, and Monsanto. Also, people will get better, their health will improve, it will ease pain and suffering, and it’s organic, which means NO PATENT, where the real money is. And that, will be fought by BigPharma.

    Lol. Time to finish my roach.

    Well, with these legalizations you can actually grow it, so reduced potency shouldn’t be an issue (it usually only is an issue in states where weed has been recognized exclusively for medicinal purposes and where there are no other options but to buy it at a dispensary, e.g. New Jersey).  Monstanto and BigPharma can go to hell because that’s where voters will be sending them if they try to cash-in on or intercede marijuana legalization.  The movement has begun and soon all potheads will be taking over the world (well, obviously so, at least, because they’ve already been in control of most of the world for quite some time).

    EDIT: P.S. You’re still smoking joints?  A vaporizer (Magic Flight or Volcano) is the thing to own.  Either way, don’t be a pessimist and enjoy the ride to full legalization.  

    ReplyCopy URL
    Gucci
    Member
    Joined:
    Nov 7th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #445239

    Yes, honey!  2 states down, 48 to go.

    ReplyCopy URL
    babypook
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 4th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #445240

    Judy, darling. I’ve been toking for many decades. I have allllll the acroutrements, including gas masks and every kind of pipe and hooka you can imagine. My joints are about five or six inches long, btw. Double paper length.

    What I love about this (finally) educated decision by the legislators, is that now, hundreds upon thousands of young, innocent kids will escape a brutal, unnecessary, ignorant, money-grubbing criminal record, for smoking pot, which has dozens upon dozens of medical uses, including brain injury, depression, insomnia, muscle pain/fibromyalgia, cancer, nausea, and the list goes on.

    Have you ever tried smoking government-issued pot Darling? LOLOL! They dont know what they’re doing. But, Monsanto does. They’re already planning their GMO crops, which will make us sick. Then, they can blame pot, and BigPharma, BigAgra, and Cargill can say SEE. Our expensive, useless, dangerous keepyousick products which we pitch every six minutes, are the way to go sheepie.

    Done for now.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Anonymous
    Joined:
    Jan 1st, 1970
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #445241

    Judy, darling. I’ve been toking for many decades. I have allllll the acroutrements, including gas masks and every kind of pipe and hooka you can imagine. My joints are about five or six inches long, btw. Double paper length.

    All of that is so unnecessary. A good vape and some good herb is all you need for a pure, clean and much more effective high/relief from <insert symptoms> here.

    What I love about this (finally) educated decision by the legislators, is that now, hundreds upon thousands of young, innocent kids will escape a brutal, unnecessary, ignorant, money-grubbing criminal record, for smoking pot, which has dozens upon dozens of medical uses, including brain injury, depression, insomnia, muscle pain/fibromyalgia, cancer, nausea, and the list goes on.

    What about the recent discoveries that marijuana is able to intercede the progression of AIDS, kills Cancer cells of various kinds, though this is not such a recent discovery, and is also highly effective – pun fully intended – in treating multiple sclerosis, PTSD and a myriad other diseases and disorders?  The list goes on and on, indeed.

    Have you ever tried smoking government-issued pot Darling? LOLOL! They dont know what they’re doing. But, Monsanto does. They’re already planning their GMO crops, which will make us sick. Then, they can blame pot, and BigPharma, BigAgra, and Cargill can say SEE. Our expensive, useless, dangerous keepyousick products which we pitch every six minutes, are the way to go sheepie.

    Done for now.

    Scary…

     

    Judy does not like this underhandedness…

    Still, it only took one brick to fall and crumble in order for the rest of the Berlin wall to come tumbling down. 

    ReplyCopy URL
    babypook
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 4th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #445242

    I used to be able to acquire this for my patients, a label I dont care for. It really helped them to relieve ocular pressure and sleep restfully at night. It also helped asthma sufferers etc etc etc. But now, the hoops they’ve put infront of us are not worth the effort, and getting an ok document to use it medically is more difficult than getting married at six. It’s completely because Harper doesnt want to piss off MacNeil Labratories, who dont take kindly to anything else which is inexpensive and which works, to siphon off their sales. Public health, doesnt matter.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Anonymous
    Joined:
    Jan 1st, 1970
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #445243

    I used to be able to acquire this for my patients, a label I dont care for. It really helped them to relieve ocular pressure and sleep restfully at night. It also helped asthma sufferers etc etc etc. But now, the hoops they’ve put infront of us are not worth the effort, and getting an ok document to use it medically is more difficult than getting married at six. It’s completely because Harper doesnt want to piss off MacNeil Labratories, who dont take kindly to anything else which is inexpensive and which works, to siphon off their sales. Public health, doesnt matter.

    Jesus. Why does this shit have to be so complicated?  It’s the only “drug” known to man that can multitask so effectively with such minimal, if any, side-effects (some people, i.e. lots and lots of pharmacists, do consider “the high” a side-effect; L-M-F-A-O), curing and relieving people of so much.

    Nonetheless, the fact that it’s become legal in two states means two things:

    1. More and more people, whether they partake of it, are jumping on the legalize marijuana bandwagon.
    2. The people are being heard. 

    ReplyCopy URL
Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
Reply To: MARIJUANA *finally* completely legal in two states (and counting)!

You can use BBCodes to format your content.
Your account can't use Advanced BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.

Similar Topics
Atypical - Aug 13, 2017
General Discussion
Andrew D - Aug 7, 2017
General Discussion