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READERS Thread (Part 2)

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  • Atypical
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    Dec 1st, 2011
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    #453529

    Man
    Booker 2015 winner to be announced later

    2 hours ago

    From the section Entertainment & Arts

    The winner of the Man Booker Prize is announced later
    with Hanya Yanagihara’s A Little Life
    the bookies’ favourite to take the £50,000 prize.

    Yanagihara’s novel, the story of four college friends
    seeking fame and fortune in New York, is tipped to win by bookmakers William
    Hill and Coral.

    It is the second year the prize is open to all authors
    writing in English, regardless of nationality.

    The winner will be announced at London’s Guildhall on
    Tuesday night.

    This year’s shortlist features two authors from the UK,
    two from the US, and one each from Jamaica and Nigeria.

    The shortlist of authors and titles is as follows:

    •   Marlon James (Jamaica), A Brief History of Seven Killings
    •   Tom McCarthy (UK), Satin Island
    •   
      Chigozie Obioma (Nigeria), The Fishermen
    •   
      Sunjeev Sahota (UK), The Year of the Runaways
    •   
      Anne Tyler (US), A Spool of Blue Thread
    •    Hanya Yanagihara (US), A Little Life


    Victory for either Yanagihara or Tyler would see the Man
    Booker have its first American winner.

    Marlon James is the first Jamaican-born author to be
    shortlisted for the prize. William Hill said his novel, which explores the
    attempted assassination of Bob Marley in the late 1970s, had moved up from
    fifth favourite to second favourite.

    This year’s judges are Michael Wood (chair), Ellah
    Wakatama Allfrey, John Burnside, Sam Leith, and Frances Osborne. They
    considered 156 books for this year’s prize.

    McCarthy is the only shortlisted author to have been
    nominated before, having been shortlisted for C in 2010.

    At 28 years old, Obioma is the youngest nominee, the same
    age as 2013 winner Eleanor Catton.

    The shortlisted authors each receive £2,500 and a
    specially bound edition of their book. The winner will receive a further cheque
    for £50,000.

    Australian author Richard Flanagan won last year’s prize
    for his wartime novel The Narrow Road to
    the Deep North
    .

    Coverage from this year’s ceremony, where the prize will
    be presented by the Duchess of Cornwall. will be on the BBC News Channel from
    2130 BST.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-34510236

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    Atypical
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    #453530

    BBC Breaking News
    Verified account

    @BBCBreaking

    5m5 minutes ago

    Jamaican author Marlon James wins UK’s Man Booker Prize for his novel A Brief History of Seven Killings

    ReplyCopy URL
    OnTheAisle
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    Sep 19th, 2011
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    #453531

    Jamaican author Marlon James wins UK’s Man Booker Prize for his novel A Brief History of Seven Killings

    I am surprised. The sheer length of this novel, the use of dialect, the
    large number of characters are all off putting. Of course, the author is extraordinarily talented with a stunning imagination.

    Still I was expecting The Fishermen

    ReplyCopy URL
    Atypical
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    #453532

    Finalists for the National Book Award

    Jocelyn McClurg, USA TODAY 8:38 a.m. EDT October 14, 2015

    The 2015 finalists for the National Book Award in
    fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature were announced
    Wednesday morning. The nominees are:

    FICTION:

    Refund by
    Karen E. Bender (Counterpoint Press)

    The Turner House by
    Angela Flournoy (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

    Fates and Furies by
    Lauren Groff (Riverhead)

    Fortune Smiles by
    Adam Johnson (Random House)

    A Little Life by
    Hanya Yanagihara (Doubleday)

    NONFICTION:

    Between the World and Me by
    Ta-Nehisi Coates (Spiegel & Grau)

    Hold Still by Sally Mann
     (Little, Brown)

    The Soul of an Octopus by
    Sy Montgomery (Atria)

    If the Oceans Were Ink: An Unlikely
    Friendship and a Journey to the Heart of the Quran
    by Carla
    Power (Henry Holt)

    Ordinary Light by
    Tracy K. Smith (Knopf)

    POETRY:

    Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude by
    Ross Gay (University of Pittsburgh Press)

    How to Be Drawn by
    Terrance Hayes (Penguin)

    Voyage of the Sable Venus by
    Robin Coste Lewis (Knopf)

    Bright Dead Things by
    Ada Limón (Milkweed)

    Elegy for a Broken Machine by
    Patrick Phillips (Knopf)

    YOUNG PEOPLE’S LITERATURE:

    The Thing About Jellyfish by
    Ali Benjamin (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers)

    Bone Gap by Laura Ruby
    (Balzer + Bray)

    Most Dangerous: Daniel Ellsberg and the
    Secret History of the Vietnam War
    by Steve Sheinkin (Roaring
    Brook Press)

    Challenger Deep by
    Neal Shusterman (HarperCollins Children’s Books)

    Nimona by Noelle Stevenson
    (HarperTeen/HarperCollins Children’s Books)

    The finalists were culled from an original long list of
    10 books in each category. Winners will be announced Nov. 18 at a ceremony
    in New York City.

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/books/2015/10/14/national-book-award-finalists-2015/73889682/

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    David Buchanan
    Keymaster
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    Nov 5th, 2010
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    #453533

    [quote=”Atypical”]

    Jamaican author Marlon James wins UK’s Man Booker Prize for his novel A Brief History of Seven Killings

    I am surprised. The sheer length of this novel, the use of dialect, the
    large number of characters are all off putting. Of course, the author is extraordinarily talented with a stunning imagination.

    [/quote]

    I am thrilled for Marlon James! This is tremendous recognition for Caribbean literature as a whole, and the novel tackles a pivotal, tumultuous period of Jamaica’s history. Coincidentally, I have the opportunity to meet Marlon tomorrow at a reading for a different author’s work, and I’m excited to speak with him about Brief History.

    Formerly known in the forums as PianoMann.

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    K-Hole
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    Jan 1st, 2014
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    #453534

    Career of Evil, by Robert Galbraith

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    Atypical
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    Dec 1st, 2011
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    #453535

    2015 National Book Award Winners (in bold type)

    FICTION

    Refund by
    Karen E. Bender (Counterpoint Press)

    The Turner House by
    Angela Flournoy (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

    Fates and Furies by
    Lauren Groff (Riverhead)

    Fortune Smiles by
    Adam Johnson (Random House)

    A Little Life by
    Hanya Yanagihara (Doubleday)

    NONFICTION

    Between the World and Me by
    Ta-Nehisi Coates (Spiegel & Grau)

    Hold Still by Sally Mann
     (Little, Brown)

    The Soul of an Octopus by
    Sy Montgomery (Atria)

    If the Oceans Were Ink: An Unlikely
    Friendship and a Journey to the Heart of the Quran
    by Carla
    Power (Henry Holt)

    Ordinary Light by
    Tracy K. Smith (Knopf)

    POETRY

    Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude by
    Ross Gay (University of Pittsburgh Press)

    How to Be Drawn by
    Terrance Hayes (Penguin)

    Voyage of the Sable Venus by
    Robin Coste Lewis (Knopf)

    Bright Dead Things by
    Ada Limón (Milkweed)

    Elegy for a Broken Machine by
    Patrick Phillips (Knopf)

    YOUNG PEOPLE’S LITERATURE

    The Thing About Jellyfish by
    Ali Benjamin (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers)

    Bone Gap by Laura Ruby
    (Balzer + Bray)

    Most Dangerous: Daniel Ellsberg and the
    Secret History of the Vietnam War
    by Steve Sheinkin (Roaring
    Brook Press)

    Challenger Deep by
    Neal Shusterman (HarperCollins Children’s Books)

    Nimona by Noelle Stevenson
    (HarperTeen/HarperCollins Children’s Books)

    ReplyCopy URL
    clay bryce
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    Jan 5th, 2015
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    #453536

    After scrolling through this thread, I feel so uneducated and a bit like a rube, if you will.  My taste in books doesn’t seem to be what we call down south “high-brow” at all. 

    Of course, having said that, the book I’m currently reading is a real page-turner and quite inspiring.  Seriously.

    Workin’ It by RuPaul.  Seriously.   

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    K-Hole
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    Jan 1st, 2014
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    #453537

    Slade House by David Mitchell
    Trippy and hallucinatory mind-blower–a real page-turner that would make a great horror movie in the right hands. 

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    K-Hole
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    #601467

    No Night is Too Long by Barbara Vine (pseudonym of Ruth Rendell)

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    M H
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    Nov 7th, 2010
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    #601544

    “Doc” by Mary Doria Russell. Highly recommended. 

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    Atypical
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    Dec 1st, 2011
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    #601707

    Starting “Home” by Toni Morrison. Excited!

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    Atypical
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    #1201746810

    Pulitzer Prize announcement on Monday afternoon (100th year!). Any thoughts on the frontrunners for the Fiction prize?

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    OnTheAisle
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    Sep 19th, 2011
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    #1201746876

    My best guesses

    Novel: The Sellout by Paul Beatty

    Play: Hamilton by Lin-Manuel Miranda

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    Atypical
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    #1201746895

    ^^^ Yes! “The Sellout” is the frontrunner. Some other major contenders: “A Manual for Cleaning Women: Selected Stories” by Lucia Berlin (the committee LOVES short story collections), “Fortune Smiles” by Adam Johnson (former winner), and “Honeydew” by Edith Pearlman (another story story collection; so many options to choose from really).

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