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RIP Maya Angelou

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  • babypook
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    Maya Angelou Dead at 86

    Maya Angelou: 1928-2014

     

    AP

     

     

    Maya Angelou, one of America’s most celebrated poets, novelists and civil-rights activists has passed away. Angelou, who served on two Presidential committees and was awarded numerous awards, was 86 years old….

     

     

    Maya Angelou: 1928-2014

     

     

     

     

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    Maya Angelou: 1928-2014

     

    Maya Angelou, one of America’s most celebrated poets, novelists and civil-rights activists has passed away. Angelou, who served on two Presidential committees and was awarded numerous awards, was 86 years old. (May 28)

     

     

     

      May 28, 2014 | 07:07AM PT

       

      Maya Angelou, the renowned poet, author and civil rights activist, has died at the age of 86, Variety has confirmed.

      Winston-Salem Mayor Allen Joines told the local Fox affiliate that Angelou was found unresponsive by her caretaker on Wednesday morning. The Winston-Salem Journal reports that a hearse with a police escort pulled away from Angelou’s home around 9 a.m. local time.

      “She lived a life as a teacher, activist, artist and human being. She was a warrior for equality, tolerance and peace,” Angelou’s family said in a statement. “The family is extremely appreciative of the time we had with her and we know that she is looking down upon us with love.”

      Angelou was best known for her coming-of-age autobiography “I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings.” The 1969 book provided an unflinching look at racism, teenage pregnancy and sexual abuse and was nominated for a National Book Award. It has become a staple in high school classrooms.

      Greater prominence arrived after the author was tapped to read her poem “On the Pulse of Morning” at the 1993 inauguration of President Bill Clinton. She was only the second person in history to be asked to read an original poem at the gathering, a distinction she shared with Robert Frost.

      The poem helped capture the energy and hope personified by the youthful leader, closing with the words, “Here on the pulse of this new day, you may have the grace to look up and out and into your sister’s eyes, into your brother’s face, your country and say simply, very simply, with hope, good morning.”

      Angelou’s recitation of her poem earned her a Grammy Award, one of three she would win for her spoken word performances.

      In a career that spanned five decades, she would write seven autobiographies, three books of essays, poems, plays and film scripts.

      In 2011, she was awarded with the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama.

      Hers was a peripatetic career that would see her directing films, acting on Broadway, singing calypso, dancing with Martha Graham and Alvin Ailey, and working alongside friends and Civil Rights icons such as James Baldwin, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr.

      Born in St. Louis in 1928, Angelou was ferried between her grandmother’s house in Arkansas and her mother’s home in Missouri. Segregation and neglect were among the defining traits of a difficult childhood that ended with Angelou becoming a single mother at 17.

      Twice married, to Greek electrician Tosh Angelos in 1951 and to carpenter Paul du Feu in 1973, Angelou had one son, Guy, one grandson, and two great-grandchildren

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      babypook
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      #454366

      Maya Angelou Dies at 86

      Culture | By on May 28, 2014 @ 6:41 am

      Getty

      The poet, author, and civil rights icon was found unresponsive in her home

      Maya Angelou, a towering icon of literature and the civil rights movement, has died at the age of 86.

      The poet was found in her Winston Salem home early Wednesday.

      Best known for her memoir “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” Angelou wrote seven autobiographies and many books of poetry; worked on civil rights issues with leaders ranging from Martin Luther King, Jr. and John F. Kennedy to Barack Obama; and even became the first African-American woman to write a produced screenplay, “Georgia, Georgia” in 1972.

      Angelou was honored with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2011.

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      babypook
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      #454367

      21 Beautiful Maya Angelou Quotes to Live by

      Media | By on May 28, 2014 @ 7:56 am
       

      Getty Images

      Whether you’re worried about life, love or your career, Angelou’s inspirational wisdom has got you covered

      Maya Angelou — a renowned poet, author, playwright, teacher, civil rights activist, speaker, actress and filmmaker — died on Tuesday, but left behind a lifetime of advice for the living.

      Throughout her 86 years on this planet, during which she rose above sexual abuse, poverty and prostitution to become a Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient, she shared her wisdom through almost every medium available, including seven autobiographies, three Grammy-winning spoken word albums, countless speeches and poems.

      In honor of Angelou’s death, celebrate her life and remember her words, which can often inspire as much as they enlighten.

      Here are 21 of her quotes to live by:

      1. “Courage is the most important of all the virtues because without courage, you can’t practice any other virtue consistently.”

      2. “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

      3. “There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you.”

      4. “When I look back, I am so impressed again with the life-giving power of literature. If I were a young person today, trying to gain a sense of myself in the world, I would do that again by reading, just as I did when I was young.”

      5. “If you don’t like something, change it. If you can’t change it, change your attitude. Don’t complain.”

      6. “You can only become truly accomplished at something you love. Don’t make money your goal. Instead pursue the things you love doing and then do them so well that people can’t take their eyes off of you.”

      7. “I’ve learned that making a ‘living’ is not the same thing as ‘making a life’.”

      8. “You can’t use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have.”

      9. “Never make someone a priority when all you are to them is an option.”

      10. “If I am not good to myself, how can I expect anyone else to be good to me?”

      11. “You may not control all the events that happen to you, but you can decide not to be reduced by them.” 

      12. “No matter what happens, or how bad it seems today, life does go on, and it will be better tomorrow.”

      13. “Most people don’t grow up. Most people age. They find parking spaces, honor their credit cards, get married, have children, and call that maturity. What that is, is aging.”

      14. “Love recognizes no barriers. It jumps hurdles, leaps fences, penetrates walls to arrive at its destination full of hope.”

      15. “First best is falling in love. Second best is being in love. Least best is falling out of love. But any of it is better than never having been in love.”

      16. “I’ve learned that regardless of your relationship with your parents, you’ll miss them when they’re gone from your life.”

      17. “We spend precious hours fearing the inevitable. It would be wise to use that time adoring our families, cherishing our friends and living our lives.”

      18. “We need much less than we think we need.”

      19. “I don’t trust anyone who doesn’t laugh.”

      20. “Hate, it has caused a lot of problems in the world, but has not solved one yet.”

      21. “I’ve learned that I still have a lot to learn.”

       

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      #454368

      I love Maya Angelou for no other reason than making reading a pleasurable act when it’s usually not for someone like me.

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      babypook
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      I absolutely adored her. She lived a life extraordinary.

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      24Emmy
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      From her masterpiece:

      The caged bird sings
      with a fearful trill
      of things unknown
      but longed for still
      and his tune is heard
      on the distant hill
      for the caged bird
      sings of freedom.

      RIP!

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      Atypical
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      This loss is particularly heartbreaking and staggering. Her works have meant a great deal to me over the years. Tragic news. RIP.

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      Gucci
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      #454372

      R.I.P. Maya Angelou. 

      Her work was both influential and inspirational.

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      At memorial service, a celebration of Maya Angelou’s voice

      by Susanna Capelouto, CNN
      updated 2:55 PM EDT, Sat June 7, 2014

      STORY HIGHLIGHTS

      • Memorial service celebrates life and work of Maya Angelou
      • Michelle Obama: “She celebrated black women’s beauty like no one had ever dared to”
      • Oprah Winfrey: “The loss I feel I cannot describe”
      • Bill Clinton: “God loaned her his voice”

       

      (CNN) — Poetry, performance, and prayer celebrated the voice of literary giant Maya Angelou at a memorial service held Saturday at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

      “She taught us that we are each wonderfully made, intricately woven and put on this earth for a purpose,” first lady Michelle Obama said during her tribute to the celebrated poet and actress.

      Angelou, 86, died at her Winston-Salem home on May 28. Angelou had been “frail” and suffering from heart problems, her literary agent said. Angelou taught American studies for years at Wake Forest.

      Obama did not meet Angelou until 2008, while on the campaign trail, but she said Angelou’s poem ‘Phenomenal Woman’ had a profound impact on her life.

      “I was struck by how she celebrated black women’s beauty like no one had ever dared to,” Obama said in the service held at Wait Chapel.

      “She also graced us with an anthem for all women, a call to all of us to embrace our God-given beauty. How desperately black girls needed that message,” the first lady said, remembering that as a young girl her first doll was a white Malibu Barbie.

      She said that Angelou reminded everyone that ” We must each find our own voice, decide our own value and then announce it to the world with all the pride and joy that is our birthright as members of the human race.”

      “Spiritual queen mother” 

      Oprah Winfrey remembered her friend as the greatest woman she has ever known.

      “The loss I feel I cannot describe,” Winfrey said, holding back tears. “It’s like something I’ve never felt before. She was my spiritual queen mother and everything that that word implies. She taught me the poetry of courage and respect.”

      Winfrey recalled meeting Angelou in the late 1970s, when she worked as a news reporter.

      “She looked at me and said, ‘Who are you girl?'” Winfrey said.

      “I will miss her.”

      “She had the voice of God”

      “I Loved Maya,” said former President Bill Clinton during his reflection. He said the two last met in April in Austin during a celebration of of the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act.

      Clinton recalled that he hugged Angelou and said, ” I cannot believe that you have gotten yourself here.” He said she responded, “Just because I’m wheelchair-bound doesn’t mean I don’t get around.”

      Clinton became aware of Angelou while in college by reading her book. “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” her lasting contribution to literature that bore witness to the brutality of a Jim Crow South.

      He said Angelou was always paying attention and used her voice to call attention to the things that really mattered.

      “God loaned her his voice. She had the voice of God and he decided he wanted it back from her,” Clinton told the audience.

      Music and more

      Actress Cicely Tyson reflected on a friendship that began in 1960, when both were in a play called “The Blacks,” which ran for three years.

       “Every emotion known to man was exhibited by Maya. She held nothing (back). She spoke her mind no matter what the situation,” Tyson remembered.

      The memorial service also featured singer Lee Ann Womack performing “I Hope You Dance,” considered Angelou’s favorite song.

      At the conclusion of the service Saturday, Angelou’s voice once more was heard in a recording of the 1996 Ashford & Simpson song “Been Found.”

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