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1974 Oscars

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  • RobertPius
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    #160044

    Anybody want to discuss? I was reading a book about 70s films and this year sticks out to me. Almost all 10 of the lead acting nominees were pretty brilliant and deserving. (I’ve never seen Claudine BTW so that one is questionable.)

    How predictable was this year? Did anybody come close to beating Godfather? Ellen Burstyn discussed this year on Goldderby. Chris said she was the favorite? True?  Did Faye Dunaway stand a chance? She kind of haunts me (because of the film’s end.)  

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    KT
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    #160046

    Great year.  This was the year of Coppola.  An astounding number of nominations for an individual (BP x2, BD, Best Original, Best Adapted), directing two incredible films: The Conversation and of course Godfather Part II.

    Gene Hackman not being nominated for his lead performance in The Conversation is a crime.  It also missed on music score, which it deserved.  It was Coppola’s first Palme d’Or winner, an extremely deserving and intimate film.  Very disturbing and still relevant today.

    Of course, Chinatown is amazing and would have won had it not faced such stiff competition.  Coppola wasn’t awarded for the first Godfather for directing, so they went all-in for him this time.  Dunaway didn’t have a huge role in Chinatown, so I’m not sure if she was competitive for the win.  Nicholson had to be close to Art Carney…same for Pacino.

    I think Godfather II is just masterful.  Brilliantly edited together.  The duality of the central characters is as powerful as the larger thematic scope of the stories, especially considering the ending.  De Niro just owns the screen.

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    Halo_Insider
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    #160047

    While I haven’t seen the film, Gena Rowlands did win the Golden Globe for A Woman Under the Influence, so I wonder if she would’ve been Burstyn’s greatest competition. 

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    Baby Clyde
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    #160048

    Gena Rowlands gives one of the greatest performances ever put on screen.

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    Allen Lim
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    #160049

    Gena Rowlands was the favorite to win. You can actually see the shock of the other nominees when Burstyn was announced.

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    Marcus Snowden (The Artist Formerly Known as msnowden1)
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    #160050

    Gena Rowlands was the favorite to win. You can actually see the shock of the other nominees when Burstyn was announced.

    Rowlands should have won. Her performance in A Woman Under the Influence was one of the best performances in cinema history.

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    seabel
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    #160051

    The robbery in Best Actor still hurts.

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    ETPhoneHome
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    #160052

    ^There were 4 nominees that would have been deserving winners for Best Actor. And Art Carney was there too.

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    manakamana
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    #160053

    I actually think Art Carney gives a lovely performance that year that sounds out amongst the more inspired of the category, but would probably rank him fourth among the nominees. I would have replaced Finney with Hackman, and ranking them as such: Hoffman, Pacino, Hackman, Nicholson, Carney. The big upset here was obviously over Nicholson, who was in the probably Best Picture runner-up and had won the Golden Globe, NSFC and NY (LA didn’t exist yet). I would have rather he won here than for his work the year after (which should have gone to Al Pacino). 

    I’m personally in the minority that finds A Woman Under the Influence to be one of Rowlands/Cassavetes less compelling collaborations, but I think with the latter’s surprise Best Director nomination people did presume her to be the frontrunner. Perinne would be my personal choice, but in spite of Scorsese’s lack of understanding of his female protagonist I think Burstyn’s win was a just one. All the nominees were rather good, though. But give me Brigitte Mira for Ali: Fear Eats the Soul over all of them any day of the week.

    Robert De Niro’s win remains today one of the finest ever rewarded in that category. Bergman’s win is the weakest of the four, imo; it doesn’t measure up to Cortese or Kahn. 

    Any of the Best Picture candidates between GFII, Chinatown and The Conversation would have been fantastic. My vote would have gone to the other Copolla film, but they’re all pretty much as great as American films can be.  

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    seabel
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    #160054

    How do you compare Cartney to Pacino?

    You… just… can… not… 

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    babypook
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    #160055

    I agree mostly with ibbster. I dont begrudge Carney’s win at all. He’s hearbreaking, without being well, heartbreaking. For me the two who gave the most memorable perfs are Pacino, and Hoffman. From a cold perspective, I’d give it to Pacino, but my heart is with Carney. I guess you’ll have to sue me.

    De Niro is a bit of a category cheat, but he’s so damned good, it’s forgiveable. Everyone is terrific in Supporting, although I’m surprised they didnt go with the wonderful Astaire, but I suppose one win of this type was enough for them. He’s fifth for me, with Bridges in a tie with De Niro.

    I’m ok with Burstyn’s Alice win, but Perrine is sublime and I would have personally gone with her. Those performances are so different and their characters miles apart, so it’s such a subjective call, as always.

    Bergman’s win isnt so suprising in retrospect, since imo that category is a coin-toss. So, let’s go with the Icon shall we?  She wouldnt have been my choice, and a comedic win for Kahn would have been subversive for the staid academy, and delightful.

    This was one of those times where Editing and Best Picture split. Now wouldnt that have been something, for “crafty” crowd-pleasing The Towering Inferno to have triumphed over the masterful Godfather 2.  Five such different, “edgy” Oscar BP noms.

     

     

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    Filmatelist
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    #160056

    Rowlands is brilliant but I think her loss can be attributed to the film being truly exhausting–and perhaps a little too frayed-nerve and improv-feeling for more conservative members of the Academy, who would be far more comfortable with Scorsese’s more straight-forward approach and Bustyn’s forceful characterization.

    Similarly, old school Academy members who weren’t the most open to harder themes and more graphic content had a very obvious film to embrace in the Best Actor category: Carney’s.  It’s a sweet, understated performance, and he’s in every moment.  But the movie feels so slight now compared to its competition.  I guess you could make a similar argument to Bergman’s win.  Under the circumstances, it’s a minor miracle that the three Godfather nominees in Supporting Actor didn’t lose to Astaire’s first nomination (every previous triple nod in an Oscar category had all lost).

    Of course, in Best Picture, there was no real soft-centered, safe & conservative choice–just four rough-edged, remarkable films and one ridiculous one.  I suspect the first Coppola won Picture by the tightest of margins, so some who didn’t vote for it the first time might’ve done so this round out of some hindsight respect (though clearly, it’s quite a deserving choice, though not mine) and with his one-two punch, Coppola would not be denied (though Hackman and Cazale were both deserving of nods).

    Of course, the most ridiculous win was Earthquake‘s for Sound over Murch’s audio masterpiece.  That disaster movies won a combined 5 Oscars that year was a tribute to how impressed Academy members continued to be by the sheer bells & whistles of scale and preposterous production overkill.

    Plus, this was the year of perhaps the greatest Honorary Oscar duo in a single year: Jean Renoir & Howard Hawks.

     
     

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    Ryan Earle
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    #160057

    This year Rowland’s was the favorite to win with people thinking if anyone was going to upset it’d be Dunaway if she was swept in to a film win sweep. Perrine was seen as “not happening” because she was originally campaigned as supporting, she won numerous supporting critics awards, then switched to lead when saw there weren’t that many great lead female roles this year. Also, she was a newcomer. Carroll had zero chance of winning. Her production company campaigned and showed “Claudine” on the Z channel in the hopes of her or Jones pulling out a possible nomination.

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    Baby Clyde
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    #160058

    Bergman’s win is ridiculous. She’s perfectly fine but doesn’t remotely stand out in that ensemble. If anyone was going to get a nom it should have been Bacall who is at least memorable (I not award worthy).

    Cortese gives an acting masterclass and should have won in a landslide, which even Ingrid acknowledged in her speech.
     

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    Halo_Insider
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    #160059

    Agreed with Filmatelist on Supporting Actor. De Niro makes for a great win, but Cazale as Fredo has some of the greatest impact in Godfather II, especially when he’s opining about his lack of respect. Shame he never earned an Oscar nod. 

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