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1980 Best Supporting Actor race

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  • RobertPius
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    #182149

    Anyone remember this one? I know it was Hutton vs. Pesci and the controversy about Hutton being a lead. BUT who else was in the running for a nomination? 

    I ask because I just saw The Great Santini and had mixed feelings about Michael O’Keefe. At times he was great but at other times not so much. I’m curious who else was up for that 5th slot?

    At the Golden Globes it was Stuart Wilson in The Ninth Configuration which I’ve never even heard of.

    Anyone remember 

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    BTN
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    #182151

    Levon helm as Loretta Lynn’s father in coal miners daughter. Such natural acting.

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    OnTheAisle
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    #182152

    BTN is correct, the omission of musician turned actor Levon Helm was a surprise. Unfortunately, the press made a bigger deal about Helm’s physical resemblance to Loretta Lynn’s father Melvin Webb than his spare and moving portrayal.

    The other noted omissions were two supporting actors of Australian import Breaker Morant, which was nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay. Though the film was a box office disappointment, both supporting actors Jack Thompson (winner at Cannes) as the defense attorney who is given a terrific speech at the end of the film and Bryan Browne (Australian Film Institute recipient) as the hotheaded lieutenant charged with war crimes caused a stir. Most likely, the vote split between the two.

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    babypook
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    #182153

    Donald Sutherland is Lead, but he missed a nomination for a very worthy perf in Ordinary People.

    Anthony Hopkins, Elephant Man

    Heinz Bennent, The Last Metro

    Ps to OnTheAisle: Edward Woodward, and his co-stars Bryan Brown and Jack Thompson were soooo worthy of their citations. What a great film and cast.

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    ETPhoneHome
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    #182154

    If Hutton was out and Sutherland in, then this lineup would be far better. Hutton would never have won lead against DeNiro, but would have merited a nomination instead of Lemmon.

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    Gone_Guy
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    #182155

    I’ve always felt Timothy Hutton should have gone Lead, while Donald Sutherland should have gone Supporting (the latter winning). I also think Mary Tyler Moore could have easily been considered Supporting. 

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    babypook
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    #182156

    ^

    He was (arguably) the Lead for sure. But he wouldnt have won. Nobody was going to overthrow De Niro. I wouldnt have a problem leaving O’Toole, Lemmon, or Duvall off the ballot to make room for him. Ditto for Sutherland in Lead.

    In supporting Sutherland would have been in tough with Pesci and Robards, but he deserved to be there. Hirsch can go in favour of Donald.

    Moore would have been a contender in Supporting, but again, she’s got strong competition from those nominated. I think Steenburgen wins again.

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    Gone_Guy
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    #182157

    ^

    He was (arguably) the Lead for sure. But he wouldnt have won. Nobody was going to overthrow De Niro. I wouldnt have a problem leaving O’Toole, Lemmon, or Duvall off the ballot to make room for him. Ditto for Sutherland in Lead.

    In supporting Sutherland would have been in tough with Pesci and Robards, but he deserved to be there. Hirsch can go in favour of Donald.

    Moore would have been a contender in Supporting, but again, she’s got strong competition from those nominated. I think Steenburgen wins again.

    It’s all really interesting. I completely agree that no one would touch De Niro. In weighing the performances…

    Lead Actor: De Niro > Hutton  
    Lead Actress: Spacek > Moore
    Supp. Actor: Sutherland > Pesci > Robards
    Supp. Actress: Moore = Steenburgen (I don’t know…!!! It’s tough)

    And yeah, Hutton won, but I’ve always wondered if he wonders, “That’s a nice shiny Oscar on my mantle… Even though I was the lead.” Same thing with Geena Davis and her win. 

    I’m also in agreement that Sutherland should have been in over Judd Hirsch (although I’m guessing Sutherland went Lead). Judd Hursch is fine, but his nomination is a total coattail nom a la Joan Cusack/Working Girl, Dan Aykroyd/Driving Miss Daisy, Jennifer Tilly/Bullets Over Broadway, Jacki Weaver/Silver Linings Playbook.  

    I’m really curious…

    Had Donald Sutherland gone Supporting, would he have won over costar Timothy Hutton? And would Judd Hirsch still be in, giving us three Supporting performances all from Ordinary People?

    Had Mary Tyler Moore gone Supporting, would it have been her or Mary Steenburgen?

    Moore must have been *thisclose* to taking down Spacek. I personally rank Spacek above Moore, but had the former won for Carrie, I bet it would have pushed Moore to the win. Coal Miner’s Daughter had seven nominations, including Picture and Adapted Screenplay, but only won Lead Actress/Spacek. Ordinary People had six nominations, but won four of them, all major: Picture, Director, Adapted Screenplay, Supporting Actor/Hutton. And don’t for a second count out Gena Rowlands in Gloria. I’m sure she ranked third in the end behind Spacek and Moore, but it’s a brilliant performance and would have made a worthy winner.

    But that begs the question… If Moore had won over Spacek, plus with Dunaway winning four years prior, would Spacek had won on any of her next rounds? She’s 1/6, all in Lead Actress:

    – 1976: Carrie (lost to Faye Dunaway/Network)
    *1980: Coal Miner’s Daughter
    – 1982: Missing (lost to Meryl Streep/Sophie’s Choice)
    – 1984: The River (lost to Sally Field/Places in the Heart)
    – 1986: Crimes of the Heart (lost to Marlee Matlin/Children of a Lesser God)
    – 2001: In the Bedroom (lost to Halle Berry/Monster’s Ball)   

    No way would she have won over Streep for 1982. That was Streep versus Lange all the way. I don’t think she would have won over Matlin for 1986. I’m sure that was always going to be either Matlin or Sigourney Weaver for Aliens. I’m not sure of 1984, as I have not seen The River. Would it have been a win-worthy performance for Spacek before giving Field Oscar no. 2?

    I am really curious if having five losses under her belt would have pushed her to the win over Halle Berry in 2001. That was a super tight race. Spacek had the Globe, Critics Choice, Indie Spirit, LAFCA, and NYCC. Berry had the SAG and NBR. I honestly think Spacek gave the better performance, but I felt Berry had been robbed of a nom for Losing Isaiah. Plus she had her still career-best performance in Introducing Dorothy Dandridge, so I’m fine with her win. Spacek would have also had a due-factor, actually an overdue-factor, on her side and that could have changed the race.    

    It’s all speculatory and fun to think about. Honestly, the idea of Sissy Spacek being in the same club with Thelma Ritter, Deborah Kerr, and the it-is-still-not-too-late Glenn Close is heartbreaking.  

    She doesn’t do much these days, and I believe the last I saw of her was her guest stint on Big Love. I am absolutely beyond thrilled to see her and Kyle Chandler on Bloodline. It’s foolish to call anything or anyone a lock at those pesky Primetime Emmys, but the moment I heard she was a series regular on a Netflix drama from the creators of Damages, I said two words: “Lock. Emmy.” It’s seriously a done deal. [Even though she is 0/3 at the Primetime Emmys.]

    I haven’t seen Timothy Hutton and Felicity Huffman in American Crime yet, but I want to. I’m going to binge it when it’s over. Huffman is in an extremely competitve category, but Hutton could get in on name alone. As much television as he’s done over the years, it’ll be nice to see him finally branded an Emmy nominee.

    Lastly, speaking of Oridinary People stars and the Emmys, I’m glad at least one major ceremony has recognized Donald Sutherland: Emmy and Globe wins for 1995’s Citizen X. Great performance. He will be 80 years old this July and I hold out hope he will get an awards season trajectory similar to Christopher Plummer’s for Beginners. Even if it’s a career win over the performance, I will be fine with that. If anything, I’ll just say, “This is actually for Ordinary People. They just were 35-45 years late getting it to him.”   

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    TomHardys
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    #182158

    Ahhhhh, Ordinary People. One of my faves. Timothy Hutton’s performance was so so good and so so impactful that I’m happy he got an Oscar regardless of the category. It was an egregious category fraud but one that I fully support because otherwise Hutton’ beautiful majestic work would go “unrewarded”. I still think Mary Tyler Moore should’ve won for one of the most complex characters/performances that I’ve ever had the pleasure to watch on screen. Beautiful film all around.

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    CAROL-CHANNING
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    #182159

    Ahhhhh, Ordinary People. One of my faves. Timothy Hutton’s performance was so so good and so so impactful that I’m happy he got an Oscar regardless of the category. It was an egregious category fraud but one that I fully support because otherwise Hutton’ beautiful majestic work would go “unrewarded”. I still think Mary Tyler Moore should’ve won for one of the most complex characters/performances that I’ve ever had the pleasure to watch on screen. Beautiful film all around.

    Ordinary People is one of my favorites, too.  Hutton’s performance is incredible, and he’s definitely in my top 3 for favorite Best Supporting Actor wins.  That being said, he is, in no way, supporting.  I just wish there was some way Donald Sutherland (who not only gives the film’s best performance, imo, but is also one of my favorite male screen performances of all-time) could have been rewarded, too… 

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    RobertPius
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    #182160

    “No way would she have won over Streep for 1982. That was Streep versus Lange all the way. I don’t think she would have won over Matlin for 1986. I’m sure that was always going to be either Matlin or Sigourney Weaver for Aliens. I’m not sure of 1984, as I have not seen The River. Would it have been a win-worthy performance for Spacek before giving Field Oscar no. 2?” 

    That’s a tough one to call. The River isn’t much of a performance really. She doesn’t get nearly as much screen time as Field and Lange. Spacek is fine in it but it really pales in comparison to the other two. I guess she could have got a sympathy vote had she lost all the other times but it would have been considered a makeup award and nothing more. I actually think she stood more of a chance in 86. She won the NYFC for Crimes of the Heart and was really quite funny in it. The real crime to me is that she wasn’t nominated for 3 Women in 77.  I don’t know how on earth she got beat out by Leslie Browne in The Turning Point. I frankly think she could have given Redgrave a run for her money for the win. 3 Women is an amazing performance. 

     

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    babypook
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    #182161

    [quote=”babypook”]

    ^

    He was (arguably) the Lead for sure. But he wouldnt have won. Nobody was going to overthrow De Niro. I wouldnt have a problem leaving O’Toole, Lemmon, or Duvall off the ballot to make room for him. Ditto for Sutherland in Lead.

    In supporting Sutherland would have been in tough with Pesci and Robards, but he deserved to be there. Hirsch can go in favour of Donald.

    Moore would have been a contender in Supporting, but again, she’s got strong competition from those nominated. I think Steenburgen wins again.

    It’s all really interesting. I completely agree that no one would touch De Niro. In weighing the performances…

    Lead Actor: De Niro > Hutton  
    Lead Actress: Spacek > Moore
    Supp. Actor: Sutherland > Pesci > Robards
    Supp. Actress: Moore = Steenburgen (I don’t know…!!! It’s tough)

    And yeah, Hutton won, but I’ve always wondered if he wonders, “That’s a nice shiny Oscar on my mantle… Even though I was the lead.” Same thing with Geena Davis and her win. 

    I’m also in agreement that Sutherland should have been in over Judd Hirsch (although I’m guessing Sutherland went Lead). Judd Hursch is fine, but his nomination is a total coattail nom a la Joan Cusack/Working Girl, Dan Aykroyd/Driving Miss Daisy, Jennifer Tilly/Bullets Over Broadway, Jacki Weaver/Silver Linings Playbook.  

    I’m really curious…

    Had Donald Sutherland gone Supporting, would he have won over costar Timothy Hutton? And would Judd Hirsch still be in, giving us three Supporting performances all from Ordinary People?

    Had Mary Tyler Moore gone Supporting, would it have been her or Mary Steenburgen?

    Moore must have been *thisclose* to taking down Spacek. I personally rank Spacek above Moore, but had the former won for Carrie, I bet it would have pushed Moore to the win. Coal Miner’s Daughter had seven nominations, including Picture and Adapted Screenplay, but only won Lead Actress/Spacek. Ordinary People had six nominations, but won four of them, all major: Picture, Director, Adapted Screenplay, Supporting Actor/Hutton. And don’t for a second count out Gena Rowlands in Gloria. I’m sure she ranked third in the end behind Spacek and Moore, but it’s a brilliant performance and would have made a worthy winner.

    But that begs the question… If Moore had won over Spacek, plus with Dunaway winning four years prior, would Spacek had won on any of her next rounds? She’s 1/6, all in Lead Actress:

    – 1976: Carrie (lost to Faye Dunaway/Network)
    *1980: Coal Miner’s Daughter
    – 1982: Missing (lost to Meryl Streep/Sophie’s Choice)
    – 1984: The River (lost to Sally Field/Places in the Heart)
    – 1986: Crimes of the Heart (lost to Marlee Matlin/Children of a Lesser God)
    – 2001: In the Bedroom (lost to Halle Berry/Monster’s Ball)   

    No way would she have won over Streep for 1982. That was Streep versus Lange all the way. I don’t think she would have won over Matlin for 1986. I’m sure that was always going to be either Matlin or Sigourney Weaver for Aliens. I’m not sure of 1984, as I have not seen The River. Would it have been a win-worthy performance for Spacek before giving Field Oscar no. 2?

    I am really curious if having five losses under her belt would have pushed her to the win over Halle Berry in 2001. That was a super tight race. Spacek had the Globe, Critics Choice, Indie Spirit, LAFCA, and NYCC. Berry had the SAG and NBR. I honestly think Spacek gave the better performance, but I felt Berry had been robbed of a nom for Losing Isaiah. Plus she had her still career-best performance in Introducing Dorothy Dandridge, so I’m fine with her win. Spacek would have also had a due-factor, actually an overdue-factor, on her side and that could have changed the race.    

    It’s all speculatory and fun to think about. Honestly, the idea of Sissy Spacek being in the same club with Thelma Ritter, Deborah Kerr, and the it-is-still-not-too-late Glenn Close is heartbreaking.  

    She doesn’t do much these days, and I believe the last I saw of her was her guest stint on Big Love. I am absolutely beyond thrilled to see her and Kyle Chandler on Bloodline. It’s foolish to call anything or anyone a lock at those pesky Primetime Emmys, but the moment I heard she was a series regular on a Netflix drama from the creators of Damages, I said two words: “Lock. Emmy.” It’s seriously a done deal. [Even though she is 0/3 at the Primetime Emmys.]

    I haven’t seen Timothy Hutton and Felicity Huffman in American Crime yet, but I want to. I’m going to binge it when it’s over. Huffman is in an extremely competitve category, but Hutton could get in on name alone. As much television as he’s done over the years, it’ll be nice to see him finally branded an Emmy nominee.

    Lastly, speaking of Oridinary People stars and the Emmys, I’m glad at least one major ceremony has recognized Donald Sutherland: Emmy and Globe wins for 1995’s Citizen X. Great performance. He will be 80 years old this July and I hold out hope he will get an awards season trajectory similar to Christopher Plummer’s for Beginners. Even if it’s a career win over the performance, I will be fine with that. If anything, I’ll just say, “This is actually for Ordinary People. They just were 35-45 years late getting it to him.”   

    [/quote]

    I thought The River was a memorable film, and similar to Lange’s Country, plucky agrarians fighting strikes, the weather, and local politics. Both are good, but for me, Spacek is more memorable. That was back when we all thought Mel Gibson was calm and sane. They’re relatively ‘quiet’ films. Not overly Oscary. My personal winner was Judy Davis, but I suppose giving both Ashcroft and she an Oscar was too much to ask.

    That was the year of Field’s “You like me, you really like me” acceptance speech. Very spontaneous, and sweet.

    I’m really glad you mention Citizen X. That television film has haunted me since I watched it.  All of the principal actors are fabulous; Stephen Rea, Max von Sydow, Imelda Staunton, Jeffrey DeMunn, and Donald Sutherland are as good as any of the nominated actors the year it came out. Donald more than deserved accolades for that controlled, and patient performance. There’s a noticable bias of “Russians are not as smart and hampered by politics vs Americans are smarter and could have helped so long ago”, but the execution is so excellent. 

    I remember Chikatilo. I remember seeing him raving like an animal in an actual cage during his trial. That tends to burn into one’s psyche.  

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    RobertPius
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    #182162

    I doubt Sutherland or MTM would have consented to go supporting. I think back then big stars stayed in the lead categories. Remember how Michael Caine seemed sort of insulted by his supporting wins?

    Levon Helm is a great suggestion. Hard to believe he got left out for Coal Miner’s Daughter. (Beverly D’Angelo too come to think of it.)

    Also, you could also make a good case that Michael O’Keefe is really the lead of The Great Santini. I guess back then they just put the younger lesser known people in supporting(Tatum O’Neal for instance.) 

     

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    Halo_Insider
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    #182163

    I doubt Sutherland or MTM would have consented to go supporting. I think back then big stars stayed in the lead categories. Remember how Michael Caine seemed sort of insulted by his supporting wins?

    Levon Helm is a great suggestion. Hard to believe he got left out for Coal Miner’s Daughter. (Beverly D’Angelo too come to think of it.)

    Also, you could also make a good case that Michael O’Keefe is really the lead of The Great Santini. I guess back then they just put the younger lesser known people in supporting(Tatum O’Neal for instance.) 

     

    Heh, they do that now! *cough* Hailee Steinfeld *cough*

    It honestly shocks me that Keisha Castle-Hughes was able to pull off the Lead nomination for Whale Rider.

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    Madson Melo
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    #182164

    Spacek is my winner for 84′, it’s a subtle performance, but it’s a great one.

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