Home Forums Movies 1993: Who Came In Second?

1993: Who Came In Second?

CREATE A NEW TOPIC
CREATE A NEW POLL
Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
Created
8 months ago
Last Reply
8 months ago
7
replies
1211
views
7
users
jez89
1
Andrew Carden
1
Macca
1
  • Joe Burns
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jan 26th, 2014
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202054072

    Hey you all! Let’s take a look back at the Oscars in 1993, which went relatively predictably besides one upset, which I will get to later!

    Best Picture: The Piano- There was some empty buzz at the time that it could upset Schindler’s List in either BP or BD, but I feel like SL won in a landslide. It must be said though that The Piano is an amazing, fascinating film that probably wouldn’t even get nominated in these days. I feel like it had a respectable amount of votes. In The Name Of The Father was third, Remains Of The Day fourth, and The Fugitive fifth.

    Best Director: Campion, although I feel like this was even more of a landslide then Best Picture. The Academy knew Speilberg was overdue, still felt guilty about snubbing him for The Color Purple, and his achievement was undeniable. I’m guessing Sheridan was third, Ivory was fourth, and Altman was fifth(They clearly didn’t like Short Cuts).

    Best Actor: Hanks was obviously a strong favorite and won by a very large sizeable majority I’d imagine, although Neeson, Day-Lewis, and Hopkins must have gotten some modest vote totals. Fishburne really had no chance.

    Best Supporting Actor: Fiennes, who was most likely close, but lost out probably because the Academy may have been too frightened of his portrayal to honor him for it ( Hannibal Lecter, Anton Chigurh, Dr. King Schultz, and even the Joker fit the “easy to love a villian” bill much more then a vicious sadistic SS Nazi Guard like the character of Amon Goeth), he was very new to Hollywood at the time, and they knew Schindler would be honored in other places. Jones was much more overdue, had a recent nomination for JFK under his belt, and also was the Academy’s only real way to honor The Fugitive. I’m guessing Postlethwaite was third(according to Tom’s book, one pundit predicted him at the time), Dicaprio was fourth, and Malkovich was fifth.

    Best Actress: Hunter, in a very strong victory, although Basset may have picked up some votes along the way. I’m guessing Thompson was third, Channing was fourth, and Winger was fifth.

    Best Supporting Actress: Now we’ve arrived at the upset! Pundits at the time were split on whether Ryder or Perez would prevail: I personally would have bet on Ryder. But Kenneth Turan’s wildcard prediction that Paquin would win turned put to be true! The Academy clearly did not really care for for The Age Of Innocence and much less Fearless, paving the way for Paquin’s excellent performance to pull through. I feel like voters all assumed either Ryder or Perez would win and “voted their hearts”, not realizing that everyone else was doing the same thing(This is also one of the reasons that Christie lost to Cotillard fourteen years later in the Lead Actress race). Thompson was fourth and Hunter was ironically dead last, given she was dead first in the Lead Actress race.

    Best Original Screenplay: No clue. The Piano hopefully won in a landslide. I’ll say Philadelphia since it won two Oscars, but it’s script is so mediocre that I have a hard time believing that it did. Please help me out and chime in your thoughts below!

    Best Adapted Screenplay: A locked up category for Schindler’s Steve Zaillian, even with all the highbrow competition. I’m guessing In The Name Of The Father came in second, The Remains Of The Day came in fourth, and Shadowlands came in last(Oh boy, what an awful film!).

    So, that’s it! What are your thoughts? If you followed the season back then, who did you think would/should win? Do you feel like this was a strong or weak year in the Academy’s history book?

    Reply
    jez89
    Participant
    Joined:
    Aug 4th, 2014
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202054333

    I don’t know enough about the year in question, but I wondered about your comment that Hanks was a runaway winner. Hopkins and Day-Lewis had recently won but I thought Neeson was well in with a chance, particularly starring in a runaway Best Picture winner. In Supporting Actor, Fiennes really should have won although TLJ was very good in The Fugitive, and as you say, the only real place to award that film. I preferred Thompson in Remains of the Day over Howard’s End, but there was no way she was winning two consecutively, both for Merchant Ivory period pieces. Hunter was much too strong, particularly with the double nomination. I have not seen Fearless so cannot assess Perez, but by all accounts Ryder was a strong favourite to win, and was presumably second to Paquin.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Andrew Carden
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jan 16th, 2016
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202054343

    I suspect The Piano, Jane Campion (with Robert Altman perhaps not far behind), Liam Neeson, Angela Bassett, Ralph Fiennes and Winona Ryder (with Rosie Perez closely trailing).

    OSCAR FLASHBACK: 20 Years of Streep – 1983 (Silkwood)

    ReplyCopy URL
    Macca
    Participant
    Joined:
    Dec 22nd, 2015
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202054369

    I think you nailed it.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Filmatelist
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 3rd, 2016
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202056564

    A few thoughts on the OP

    (They clearly didn’t like Short Cuts).

    There’s really no evidence of this, since it never had any kind of chance in most of the categories–certainly none of the tech/craft ones, and the ensemble acting was excellent but never really coalesced around a single person (Julianne Moore, Jennifer Jason Leigh & Madeline Stowe all figured in the pre-cursors). That left Director and Screenplay, both of which had to compete with the Best Picture candidates. In short, it’s not so much they disliked it as it wasn’t (like most Altman films) typical Oscar fare.

    Hunter was ironically dead last, given she was dead first in the Lead Actress race.

    Not ironically; rather, inevitably. Nobody was going to vote for Hunter in supporting when they knew she was likely to win in lead. These choices aren’t made independent of each other, so it’s completely expected that her total would probably be the least for Supporting.

    Best Original Screenplay: No clue. The Piano hopefully won in a landslide. I’ll say Philadelphia since it won two Oscars, but it’s script is so mediocre that I have a hard time believing that it did.

    I suspect you’re right about PHILADELPHIA because of the cause, not the quality. Of course, the conspicuous omission here is GROUNDHOG DAY, which placed second w/the NY Critics (after SCHINDLER) and won the BAFTA but was snubbed by the Academy. If I had to guess among those that were left, I’d speculate SLEEPLESS (Nora Ephron was widely admired), DAVE and LINE OF FIRE last.

    ReplyCopy URL
    BenitoDelicias
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 3rd, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202056603

    Picture: Pretty obvious it was The Piano. Then Father, Remains and Fugitive last.

    Director: can’t be anyone other than Campio. With Altman, Sheridan and Ivory next in that order.

    Actor: I suppose Hanks won in a landslide. Then Neeson. Can’t imagine Hopkins, Fishburne or Day Lewis figuring in this race.

    Actress: another landslide with Hunter. Then Bassett obviously and the other three with very little to no chance at all.

    Sup Actor: Jones was in a popular movie, nominated for BP, overdue actor with a recent JFK nod. Clear winner. Then Fiennes. I guess Postlethwaite, Malkovich, DiCaprio next in that order.

    Sup Actress: this one’s tough. I guess Thompson winning the previous year and having two nods this year was enough of a reward. Hunter becomes th easy default 5th place. Easy. Paquin wins, Ryder is the obvious second, Perez third then the double nominees.

    Screeplays: common, such easy categories to predict and asume these winners won in more landslides for this year. Philadelphia and In the Name of the Father seem like the only options for second place.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Eduardo Galhardo
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 14th, 2015
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202060309

    Best Picture: The Piano

    Best Director: Jane Campion, The Piano

    Best Actor: Liam Neeson, Schindler’s List

    Best Supporting Actor: Ralph Fiennes, Schindler’s List (should have won)

    Best Actress: Angela Basset, What’s Love Got to Do with It

    Best Supporting Actress: Winona Ryder, The Age of Innocence

    Best Original Screenplay: Philadelphia

    Best Adapted Screenplay: In the Name of the Father

    ReplyCopy URL
    Eddy Q
    Participant
    Joined:
    Oct 13th, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202065479

    These are all quite easy guesses in many ways. Mine are the same as Eduardo’s above.

    ReplyCopy URL
Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
Reply To: 1993: Who Came In Second?

You can use BBCodes to format your content.
Your account can't use Advanced BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.

Similar Topics
Owl-Alw... - Dec 12, 2017
Movies
LBC1 - Dec 12, 2017
Movies