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2005 Supp. Actor – Looking Back: Was Clooney Locked?

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  • Jaqen H’ghar
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    #199020

    2005 Supporting Actor
    – Oscar: George Clooney, Syriana
    – SAG: Paul Giamatti, Cinderella Man
    – BAFTA: Jake Gyllenhaal, Brokeback Mountain
    – Golden Globe: Clooney
    – Critics Choice: Giamatti
    – LAFC: William Hurt, A History of Violence
    – NYCC: Hurt
    – NSFC: Ed Harris, A History of Violence
    – NBR: Gyllenhaal
    – Indie Spirit: Matt Dillon, Crash

    I had no idea how wide open Supporting Actor was that year. It’s easy to see how Gyllenhaal won at BAFTA (because Clooney was double-nominated and split the votes). Hurt won LAFC and NYCC yet didn’t even get nominated for SAG, BAFTA, Globe, or Critics Choice. Dillon was the only Oscar nominee to get nominated for the Indie Spirit Award, which he won.

    Giamatti was fresh off of two snubs for American Splendor and especially Sideways. But Clooney had made a splash as writer/director/producer with Good Night, and Good Luck. All Clooney had won was a St. Louis Critics Award and the Globe. Did Russell Crowe cost Paul Giamatti the Oscar? Rather, did Crowe’s publicity stunt (phone-to-the-face) cost all around buzz for Cinderella Man? Or was it always going to go to Clooney?

    Furthermore, how would Clooney’s Oscar history have looked had he lost for Syriana? Personally, I think he would have still lost for Michael Clayton (to Day-Lewis) and Up in the Air (to Bridges), but I could have totally seen him winning for The Descendants (over Dujardin). And he would have gotten a second Oscar the next year as producer for Argo.

    This is all what-ifs and hypotheticals. But it’s rare to see the top 10 voting bodies above split amongst so many contenders anymore.   

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    jf123
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    #199022

    From what I remember, Giamatti was considered to be the frontrunner during the early part of the season, then when Clooney won the Globe (he even said that he thought Giamatti would win) things started to go in his direction.

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    RobertPius
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    #199023

    I remember Clooney as a lock. The director nomination that he was definitly going to lose kind of assued it. Plus Cinderella Man wasn’t that popular a filmwith the Academy.

    I agree that if Clooney hadn’t one that his first Oscar would be for The Descendents.  

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    christy-m
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    #199024

    I also felt that the Academy wanted to reward Clooney for something that night, and since he clearly wasn’t going to win director or screenplay for “Good Night and Good Luck”, they gave him the supporting actor Oscar in stead.
    Though I do remember that the commentator on the channel were I was watching the Oscars on was really surprised that Giamatti lost, so I guess not everybody considered Clooney to be a lock. 

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    Milk Money
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    #199025

    Yeah, Clooney would have definitely won for The Decendants had he not won in 2005. And that award was a something of a consolation prize after such a banner year.

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    Atypical
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    #199026

    Clooney has “Good Night, and Good Luck” to thank for his meh “Syriana” consolation win. In a normal year, I’d guess that Giamatti could have coasted on his “Sideways” snub all the way to a makeup win for “Cinderella Man.” The Academy wasn’t “ready” to award Gyllenhaal yet. Dillon was lucky to get the nomination honor. Hurt was considered the “surprise” nominee, and a win for him would have been very cool but the most unlikely. Clooney couldn’t have wished for a better and more divided field in this particular year.

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    Madson Melo
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    #199027

    Clooney vs. Giamatti

    Clooney was considered as a make up for all the nominations that he also had for GNGL, but Giamatti was already a veteran with a SAG win and a snub the year before that was much talked.

    Gyllenhaal was a solid third but never really gained traction as much as Ledger did, both Dillon and Hurt never had a chance.

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    OnTheAisle
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    #199028

    George Clooney began his acceptance speech, “Wow. Wow. So I am not winning Director.” The Best Supporting Actor Oscar as a consolation prize was no secret.

    I disagree, though, with other posters. I strongly suspect that second place in the balloting went to Matt Dillon for Crash.

    Crash won Best Picture and Dillion was its sole acting nominee. Only five of the Best Picture winners in the past two decades did not have a supporting acting nomination. Of the fifteen that did, seven had nominees who won.

    Dillon was then celebrating a quarter of a century as an actor. He had successfully evolved from child star to adult heartthrob. He moved from studio pictures to independent projects with ease. He most recently had been working in high profile, hit comedies. Crash was a return to the dramatic form. Oscar loves a success story.

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    babypook
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    #199029

    George Clooney began his acceptance speech, “Wow. Wow. So I am not winning Director.” The Best Supporting Actor Oscar as a consolation prize was no secret.

    I disagree, though, with other posters. I strongly suspect that second place in the balloting went to Matt Dillon for Crash.

    Crash won Best Picture and Dillion was its sole acting nominee. Only five of the Best Picture winners in the past two decades did not have a supporting acting nomination. Of the fifteen that did, seven had nominees who won.

    Dillon was then celebrating a quarter of a century as an actor. He had successfully evolved from child star to adult heartthrob. He moved from studio pictures to independent projects with ease. He most recently had been working in high profile, hit comedies. Crash was a return to the dramatic form. Oscar loves a success story.

    This, entirely. Dillon at first appeared to be the consolation nominee for BP contender, but not so fast. (Personally, I was rooting hard for someone else….)

    Clooney gained quite a bit of weight for the role, in a somewhat mess of a film which appealed to the ‘elite’ and the ‘brainiacs’ to a large degree.

    The weight gain can be everything sometimes. At least he didnt mess with his eyebrows…

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    Anonymous
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    #199030

    Jake Gyllenhaal should have won.

    Clooney is a joke. Comparing to Gyllenhaal, he’s the Antichrist of actors.

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