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Alternate Oscars: 1962

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  • darthvader12
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    #220371

    Best Picture: Lawrence of Arabia
    Best Director: David Lean (Lawrence of Arabia)
    Best Actor: Gregory Peck (To Kill a Mockingbird)
    Best Actress: Anne Bancroft (The Miracle Worker)
    Best Supporting Actor: Omar Sharif (Lawrence of Arabia)
    Best Supporting Actress: Patty Duke (The Miracle Worker)
    Best Original Screenplay: Through a Glass Darkly
    Best Adapted Screenplay: To Kill a Mockingbird
    Best Foreign Language Film: Divorce, Italian Style
    Best Documentary Feature: Black Fox
    Best Documentary Short: Dylan Thomas
    Best Live Action Short: Heureux Anniversaire
    Best Animated Short: The Hole
    Best Original Score: Lawrence of Arabia
    Best Adaptation or Treatment Score: The Music Man
    Best Original Song: “Days of Wine and Roses” (Days of Wine and Roses)
    Best Sound Recording: Lawrence of Arabia
    Best Art Direction – Black and White: To Kill a Mockingbird
    Best Art Direction – Color: Lawrence of Arabia
    Best Cinematography – Black and White: To Kill a Mockingbird
    Best Cinematography – Color: Lawrence of Arabia
    Best Costume Design – Black and White: What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?
    Best Costume Design – Color: The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm
    Best Film Editing: Lawrence of Arabia
    Best Visual Effects: The Longest Day

    • This topic was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by  darthvader12.
    • This topic was modified 1 year, 4 months ago by  darthvader12.
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    Andrew Carden
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    #220373

    “To Kill a Mockingbird,” David Lean, Gregory Peck, Lee Remick, Victor Buono, Mary Badham

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    OnTheAisle
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    #220374

    For me, the intriguing question is if Katharine Hepburn had won Best Actress in 1962 for her brilliant portrayal of Mary Cavan Tyrone in Long Day’s Journey Into Night (isn’t that last shot phenomenal?), would Anne Bancroft as Mrs. Robinson in The Graduate have prevailed as Best Actress in 1968 over Hepburn’s much maligned win in Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner?

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    babypook
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    #220375

    For me, the intriguing question is if Katharine Hepburn had won Best Actress in 1962 for her brilliant portrayal of Mary Cavan Tyrone in Long Day’s Journey Into Night (isn’t that last shot phenomenal?), would Anne Bancroft as Mrs. Robinson in The Graduate have prevailed as Best Actress in 1968 over Hepburn’s much maligned win in Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner?

    Hard to say. Hepburn and Tracy were a force of nature, both on and off the screen.

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    Andrew Carden
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    #220376

    For me, the intriguing question is if Katharine Hepburn had won Best Actress in 1962 for her brilliant portrayal of Mary Cavan Tyrone in Long Day’s Journey Into Night (isn’t that last shot phenomenal?), would Anne Bancroft as Mrs. Robinson in The Graduate have prevailed as Best Actress in 1968 over Hepburn’s much maligned win in Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner?

    Not sure. Wasn’t Edith Evans actually considered the front-runner in that category, for “The Whisperers”? Dunaway and (Audrey) Hepburn surely had no chance.

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    OnTheAisle
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    #220377

    [quote=”OnTheAisle”]

    For me, the intriguing question is if Katharine Hepburn had won Best Actress in 1962 for her brilliant portrayal of Mary Cavan Tyrone in Long Day’s Journey Into Night (isn’t that last shot phenomenal?), would Anne Bancroft as Mrs. Robinson in The Graduate have prevailed as Best Actress in 1968 over Hepburn’s much maligned win in Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner?

    Not sure. Wasn’t Edith Evans actually considered the front-runner in that category, for “The Whisperers”? Dunaway and (Audrey) Hepburn surely had no chance.
    [/quote]

    You are correct in that three time Oscar nominee Dame Edith Evans won the precursors.

    However, in hindsight, it is clear that a number of factors led to Katharine Hepburn’s win.

    1. The Whisperers failed to receive any other nominations than Evans as Mrs. Ross.
    2. The Whisperers was in black and white. In 1967, the Academy combined technical categories for color and black and white films. The message was clear. Black and white was being shown the door. Though Elizabeth Taylor won Best Actress in 1966 in a black and white film, no one has since.
    3. As in 1978, when all the top prizes were given to films about the Vietnam War, the top prizes in 1967 all went to films about civil rights. The nomination of Best Supporting Actress Beah Richards prevented a #OscarsSoWhite brouhaha, but the failure to recognize Sidney Poitier, star of two of the Best Picture nominees, was definitely noticeable. Hepburn’s role as a liberal San Francisco mother in outspoken vocal support of her daughter’s interracial marriage was helpful in winning.
    4. Spencer Tracy died shortly after filming Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner. It was widely known in Hollywood circles that Hepburn nursed the critically ill Tracy through the production. There was a definite desire to recognize the veteran Hollywood pair. Awarding the Oscar to Tracy posthumously would have resulted in Mrs. Tracy accepting the award. That would not have produced the desired celebration of the famed couple.
    5. Finally, Hepburn had not won an Oscar in over three decades and now had a record ten nominations. She was overdue.

    Had Katharine Hepburn won in 1962, the 1968 Best Actress prize might have been more competitive.

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    keithw
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    #220378

    I am guessing you meant no one won Best Actress for a black and white film since Elizabeth Taylor…….Tatum O’Neal, Ben Johnson, and Cloris Leachman all won Oscars in the 1970’s for supporting performances in their black and  white films.

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    OnTheAisle
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    #220379

    I am guessing you meant no one won Best Actress for a black and white film since Elizabeth Taylor…….Tatum O’Neal, Ben Johnson, and Cloris Leachman all won Oscars in the 1970’s for supporting performances in their black and  white films.

    Correct. So did the lead actor in The Artist.

    I think the point is that with The Last Picture Show and Paper Moon, director Peter Bogdonavich battled the studio to use black and white to evoke a time period. It was part of his vision for the film.

    The days of black and white as a budgetary constraint were done. More and more color TVs were in homes. The movies had to change to maintain relevance.

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    KyleBailey
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    #220380

    I recently saw Days of Wine and Roses on TCM and was blown away. I’ve seen a lot of Jack Lemmon’s work now and I have to say that was his best performance. The scene of him in the greenhouse (I think?) is just devastating. I would have given both him and Lee Remick the acting awards. I would have also given it Best Picture in a perfect world. I would give Omar Supporting Actor but realistically I would give Brock Peters it for To Kill a Mockingbird. Supporting the same way with Collin Wilcox for Supporting Actress for To Kill a Mockingbird 

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    Andrew Carden
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    #220381

    Indeed, what a travesty Lemmon won for dreck like “Save the Tiger” instead of “Days of Wine and Roses” (even though I support Peck here).

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    OnTheAisle
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    #220382

    I recently saw Days of Wine and Roses on TCM and was blown away. I’ve seen a lot of Jack Lemmon’s work now and I have to say that was his best performance. The scene of him in the greenhouse (I think?) is just devastating. I would have given both him and Lee Remick the acting awards. I would have also given it Best Picture in a perfect world.

    I adore Jack Lemmon. No doubt that the greenhouse scene in Days of Wine and Roses is the finest piece of acting he ever did. Yet, for me, the ending of the film is too melodramatic.

    I prefer Lemmon in Some Like It Hot, The Apartment, and Missing. His Oscar for the overblown Save the Tiger is a disappointment. Hopefully, not too many present viewers watch that misfire and then miss Lemmon’s best performances.

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    KyleBailey
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    #220383

    I defend Save the Tiger. I thought he was fantastic in that as well. But Days of Wine and Roses and Some Like it Hot top his list for me. 

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    OnTheAisle
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    #220384

    I don’t think I would choose to watch Save the Tiger again.

    In his acceptance for his Best Actor Oscar, Lemmon acknowledged that he expected to win for Some Like It Hot. He said, “Well, I tell you, I had a speech prepared…in 1959. I’ve forgotten it.”

    Lemmon lost the Golden Globe for Save the Tiger and won no critics prizes. Most of these went to fellow Oscar nominees Al Pacino in Serpico and Marlon Brando in Last Tango in Paris.

    When the overdue Lemmon was named the Oscar winner in 1973 for Save the Tiger, the Academy had endured two Best Actors winners (Geroge C. Scott for Patton and Marlon Brando for The Godfather) in the previous three years who declined the honor. There was a strong sentiment in Hollywood that someone be chosen who actually wanted to win.

    Lemmon didn’t disappoint. He closed his acceptance speech, “In recent years especially there has been a great deal of criticism about this award. And probably a great deal of that criticism is very justified. I would just like to say that whether it’s justified or not, I think it is one hell of an honor and I am thrilled. And I thank you all very, very much.”

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    Filmatelist
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    #220385

    [quote=”keithw”]

    I am guessing you meant no one won Best Actress for a black and white film since Elizabeth Taylor…….Tatum O’Neal, Ben Johnson, and Cloris Leachman all won Oscars in the 1970’s for supporting performances in their black and  white films.

    Correct. So did the lead actor in The Artist.

     

    [/quote]

    And Martin Landau in ED WOOD.  

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    Filmatelist
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    #220386

    My favorite French film of all time (and one of my top ever) is CLEO FROM 5 TO 7, which was released in the US in 1962, so that would’ve definitely gotten my Picture award, as well as director for Agnes Varda–which would’ve been the first female winner in that category.

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