AMOUR – News/reviews

Home // Forums // Movies // AMOUR – News/reviews

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 28 total)
Created
5 years ago
Last Reply
5 years ago
27
replies
584
views
13
users
8
4
2
  • Scottferguson
    Participant
    Joined:
    Sep 26th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #69699

    Could find a previous thread for this, and since it is a serious contender for perhaps nine nominations, thought I’d start one.

    Just saw it – here is my take

    BP – Very likely nominee. It will be out early enough, it looks to be Sony Classics main shot in this category, there are many European members, and its story of an elderly couple will resonate. Very unlikely winner

    Best Actor – Solid shot at nomination for Jean-Louis Trintignant. Honorary Oscar meriting career, terrific performance. Chances for winning not great, but would be boosted by major critics’ group wins.

    Best Actress – Solid shot at nomination for Emmanuelle Riva – radiant, then painful performance, on the mark throughout. Chances for winning not great, but again major critics’ wins might change that. Might be more likely than Cotillard among the two SPC French films.

    Best Supporting Actress – Isabelle Huppert – not in it a lot, but a couple of great scenes, and she has had a great career

    Best Director – Michael Haneke, quite likely nominee, long shot winner, but if other nominees have won before and closely divided race, possible

    Best Original Screenplay – Near certain nominee, possible winnner

    Best Cinematography – Europe’s top DP these days, worked for many major directors (including Americans), previous nominee, shot Woody Allen’s last 2 films. Mainly interior works against it, but lots of Europeans in the branch, so competetive but not leading contender. No chance of winning.

    Best Film Editing – Very smartly edited, but long shot

    Best Foreign Language Film – Likely nominee, possible winner

    That in Tom’s pundit wrapup only one person lists this as a leading contender to me is a major mistake. I would be surprised if it’s not a BP nominee.                               

    Reply
    theproblemdog
    Participant
    Joined:
    Aug 30th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #69701

    Awesome! I’ve seen the trailer and I’m excited to see the film. I have it in for BP, actor, actress, director, and screenplay at the moment. When will it be released in the States?

    ReplyCopy URL
    Scottferguson
    Participant
    Joined:
    Sep 26th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #69702

    It opens in Nov around Thanksgiving in NY/LA, other big cities by Xmas, I assume a slow rollout

    ReplyCopy URL
    Riley
    Participant
    Joined:
    Oct 11th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #69703

    It will be at the Vancouver International Film Festival in a few weeks; this and The Sessions will probably be the ones that I see there.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Aunt Peg
    Member
    Joined:
    Dec 27th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #69704

    I saw this a couple of months ago and think it has a good shot at a number of nominations:

    Picture
    Actor – I think Trintignant will make the final five at the expense of one of the actors that people are currently predicting. Don’t know who it will be but doubt it will either Hawkes or Phoneix who appear to be virtual locks. Maybe I’m thinking this only because it would seem so odd for Emmanuelle Riva to receive a well deserved nomination and Trintignant not.
    Actress
    Director
    Screenplay
    Foreign Language Film – With the annoucement today of the French entry The Intouchables, Amour is now not the lock I thought it would be for a win in this category but still the most likely winner.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Scottferguson
    Participant
    Joined:
    Sep 26th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #69705

    I imagine Intouchables will make the final 9, problematic that it makes the final 5, wins only if the other films are both very heavy and quite good and it is the “fun” alternative.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Scottferguson
    Participant
    Joined:
    Sep 26th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #69706

    The GD glitches prevented me from starting posting reviews, but I’ll go now. It opens tomorrow (Weds) in NY/LA,  and trails only Zero Dark 30 as the best reviewed film of the year. The current Metacritic score is 92.

    Manohla Dargis/NYTimes

    By
    Published: December 18, 2012

    A masterpiece about life, death and everything in
    between, Michael
    Haneke
    ’s “Amour” takes a long, hard, tender look at an elderly French
    couple, Georges and Anne — played by two titans of French cinema, Jean-Louis
    Trintignant and Emmanuelle Riva — in their final days. Set in contemporary
    Paris, it begins with the couple’s front door being breached by a group of
    firemen. One moves through the rooms, delicately raising a hand to his nose
    before throwing open several large windows. He may be trying to erase the smell
    that probably brought the firemen there in the first place and which has
    transformed this light, graceful, enviable apartment into a crypt.

    More About This Movie

    Related


    Michael
    Haneke Directs ‘Amour’

    By LARRY ROHTER

    Michael Haneke’s new film, “Amour,” winner of the Palme d’Or at
    Cannes, stars Jean-Louis Trintignant and Emmanuelle Riva as a loving aging
    couple facing infirmity.

    Did I mention this is a love story? It is, as well as a
    mystery of a type that, like some classic films noir and detective stories,
    reveals its secrets by rewinding to a past moment and then moving forward in
    time to return to the present. It opens with Georges and Anne, former music
    teachers, watching a concert by one of her prized students, the noted young
    pianist Alexandre Tharaud (as himself). Afterward they greet him
    backstage — Mr. Tharaud slices through a swarm of admirers to kiss her — and
    return home, an interlude set to his performance of Schubert’s
    Impromptu (Op. 90, No. 1), a type of music that’s called a character piece and
    is meant to convey a mood or idea.

    The music helps set an air of soothing, restrained
    elegance as does Mr. Haneke’s meticulous compositions, his impeccable, steady
    framing and harmoniously arranged people and objects. Everything seems just so,
    just right, creating a sense of order that carries through until the couple
    reach their apartment and discover that the lock on their front door is broken.
    Someone apparently has tried to break in, a would-be intrusion that sends a
    shudder through the movie and down your spine. That’s because it echoes the
    first image of the firemen bursting into the apartment and because you never
    know what shocks, what brutality, Mr. Haneke — whose films include “The
    White Ribbon”
    and “Caché” as
    well as the Austrian version of “Funny Games” and its American redo — will let
    loose.

    There is a jolt of violence in “Amour,” never fear (or
    do!). Nothing, though, seems amiss the next morning while Georges and Anne eat
    breakfast in a corner of their kitchen, talking amid the clatter of dishes and
    cutlery. He notices that the salt shaker is empty and rises to refill it, and he
    continues to chatter unaware that Anne has frozen in her chair, as if turned to
    stone. Perplexed, he waves a hand in front of her seemingly unseeing eyes. After
    a few beats, he dresses, presumably to get a doctor, but, as abruptly, Anne
    seems to return to normal. She scolds him gently — she doesn’t remember what
    just happened — and then she pours the tea and misses her cup.

    By the time you next see them together, Anne in a
    wheelchair. She has had an operation for a carotid artery obstruction and while
    the procedure has a high success rate, she has drawn a fatal short straw. “It’s
    all terribly exciting,” a visibly unexcited, deadpan Georges explains to their
    daughter, Eva (a fantastic Isabelle
    Huppert
    ). Wildly self-centered, Eva asks about the operation only after she
    natters on about her work (she’s a musician), her husband and children. She may
    be embarrassed or unsettled by her mother’s illness, but when Eva asks what she
    can do, her words sound hollow. “We’ve always coped, your mother and I,” Georges
    says, maybe to reassure himself as much as a daughter who can feel like a
    stranger.

    A grace note of the movie is that the distance between
    Eva and her parents, an alienation that adds an edge into her voice when she
    talks to Georges and he to her, is never explained. Mr. Haneke doesn’t put his
    characters on the couch, offering up personalities that can be easily scanned
    and compartmentalized. As a consequence, his characters can be difficult to get
    a handle on, opaque, which might be frustrating if there wasn’t so much meaning
    packed into their everyday conversations and gestures, including what they leave
    unsaid. Early on, for instance, Anne teases Georges — at least she seems to be
    teasing — by calling him a monster. She doesn’t explain herself and neither does
    Mr. Haneke, which allows her meaning to reverberate, to grow steadily louder
    until it booms.

    After Anne returns home, she gradually goes from bad to
    worse. Georges tries to care for her by himself, but, in time, is forced to hire
    nurses. The inevitable is, well, inevitable. But in this movie it is also
    consistently surprising because of the clarity of Mr. Haneke’s vision. There is
    a great deal that is difficult to watch here, the indignities of a debilitating
    illness included, and the equally harsh pain of witnessing a great love, a
    longtime companion, slowly fade away. The moving, subtly brilliant performances
    of Ms. Riva (best known for “Hiroshima Mon Amour”) and Mr. Trintignant (“A Man
    and a Woman”) are a particular gift in this respect. The two are, after all, at
    once forever young, immortalized in their films, and as familiar to us as our
    grandparents.

    The representation of pain can be rightly difficult to
    watch, yet all too often also meaningless. But “Amour,” despite its agonizing
    subject, holds you willingly throughout. A key to understanding why comes at the
    beginning, when you see Georges and Anne at the concert, tucked in the audience
    that’s facing forward as if it were looking at the camera or, disconcertingly,
    us. It’s hard to see them, but they’re there, somewhat center and to the left,
    waiting and then clapping. It’s curious, this impression that the characters
    you’re watching are in turn watching and even applauding you. The moment can be
    characterized as an instance of Brechtian estrangement, which is meant to break
    the effects of illusion and awaken an attitude of criticism in the audience.
    More simply, the theater audience directly mirrors the movie audience, eroding
    the nominal distance between them.

    This erosion of distance actually strengthens the
    film’s emotional power. Viewers acquainted with Mr. Haneke’s work may find
    “Amour” too cold, cruel even, and its depiction of suffering a punishing,
    familiar gesture from a director who’s long been interested in transforming
    spectators from simple consumers into critical thinkers. There are certainly
    arguments to be made about whether movie-watching is ever simple or noncritical.
    Yet there’s another point to be made here, namely that all the violence in
    “Amour” is crucial to Mr. Haneke’s rigorous, liberatingly unsentimental
    worldview, one that gazes on death with the same benevolent equanimity as life.
    All of which is to say: bring hankies. This is a film that will make you weep
    not only because life ends but also because it blooms.    

         

    ReplyCopy URL
    Jake
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jul 2nd, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #69707

    I liked the film. Didn’t love it but really liked it (maybe I will love it when I’ll be older and more experienced). I can appreciate it even more as the portrayal of central characters wasn’t very far from my own grandparents and their illnesses. IDK about the ending, I’d like to discuss it in some thread when I won’t have to be afraid of spoiling the film for anyone. And for the record Trintignant was my MVP. I know that Riva had easier as the competition among female roles is much less heated but he was even better.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Scottferguson
    Participant
    Joined:
    Sep 26th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #69708

    The issue I am hearing increasingly is that Academy members over 70 are very unsettled by the film and feel very uncomfortable about it, which clearly could have an impact on its Oscar future. The resistance is far stronger than I anticipated, but then I’m not exactly that age group yet.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Daniel Montgomery
    Participant
    Joined:
    May 14th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #69709

    My review:

    Part of my problem with those previous films is that [Michael Haneke] is merciless in his technique but also generally heartless in his storytelling. What makes his latest film, Amour, as outstanding as it is is that he is once again merciless, but this time he is also full of compassion. Because he pulls no punches, it’s an emotionally grueling film to watch, but it is also deeply rewarding.

    MY COMPLETE REVIEW 

    ReplyCopy URL
    Baby Clyde
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 8th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #69710

    I adored it.

    My favourite film of the year by far.

    Riva is AMAZING!!!

    ReplyCopy URL
    Scottferguson
    Participant
    Joined:
    Sep 26th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #69711

    I sort of have a 7-way tie for first, Amour is one of them; and Riva is my favorite performance overall

    ReplyCopy URL
    Daniel Montgomery
    Participant
    Joined:
    May 14th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #69712

    I sort of have a 7-way tie for first, Amour is one of them; and Riva is my favorite performance overall

    I’ve been slow to watch films this year, so I’ve probably seen far fewer than you have, but I wish I’d seen six other films as good as this one. This is in my #1 slot. “Zero Dark Thirty” and “The Deep Blue Sea” are close behind.

    What are your other six? 

    ReplyCopy URL
    Scottferguson
    Participant
    Joined:
    Sep 26th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #69713

    as of now (have Tabu and Looper yet to see among conceivable entries), in rough order as of now – ZD20, Kid With a Bike, Amour, Flight, The Master, Once Upon a time in Anatolia, Holy Motors, Barbara, Deep Blue Sea, Killer Joe

    Don’t think I could make myself much more eclectic or schizoid   

    ReplyCopy URL
    Baby Clyde
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 8th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #69714

    I sort of have a 7-way tie for first, Amour is one of them; and Riva is my favorite performance overall

    To be fair I’ve hardly seen any of the contenders so far this year. I’m in London so the big hitters are only just opening.

    Seen Rust and Bone, Argo, Silver Linings Playbook, The Master, Skyfall. Got 2 weeks off now to start catching up

    ReplyCopy URL
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 28 total)
Reply To: AMOUR – News/reviews

You can use BBCodes to format your content.
Your account can't use Advanced BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.

Similar Topics
Andrew D - Sep 19, 2017
Movies
Hunter-ish - Sep 19, 2017
Movies