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Best Actor: 1959

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  • darthvader12
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    #1201746766

    These are my Best Actor nominees for 1959. Feel free to vote for your pick.

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    Andrew Carden
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    #1201746783

    Laurence Harvey

    The Heston win was a complete travesty.

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    manakamana
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    #1201746792

    Jack Lemmon of those nominees. My winner is Victor Sjöström in Wild Strawberries.

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    babypook
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    #1201746794

    I went with the great, Laurence Harvey, who could have been cited for Darling, The Manchurian Candidate, and Of Human Bondage, just to name three.

    Such a terrific, compelling actor.

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    tjd
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    #1201746802

    Of those, I’d have to go with Lemmon. My own personal top five though:

    Tony Curtis, Some Like It Hot
    Charlton Heston, Ben-Hur
    Martin LaSalle, Pickpocket
    Jean-Pierre Léaud, The 400 Blows
    Jack Lemmon, Some Like It Hot 

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    Anonymous
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    #1201746837

    Charlton Heston was always a better stage actor than film actor. He concentrated on Shakespeare and historical dramas on stage. His bombast that hindered his screen presence was quite effective in live theater.

    As Ben-Hur (a role reportedly declined by many including Rock Hudson, Marlon Brando, Kirk Douglas, Paul Newman, and Burt Lancaster), director William Wyler carefully constructed Heston’s performance. Ben-Hur has a life long relationship with Messala (Stephen Boyd). Wyler directed Boyd to play the role with silently longing for his friend but never tell Heston what he was doing. The homoerotic overtones are evident and Ben-Hur’s indifference is compelling.

    The Oscar should have gone to Jack Lemmon for his hilarious work in Some Like It Hot, considered to be one of the great screen comedies. Lemmon himself thought he should have won the award and said so in 1973 when he finally did win a Best Actor Oscar, more for being overdue than exceptional work in Save The Tiger. His speech began, “Well, I tell you, I had a speech prepared…in 1959. I’ve forgotten it.”

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    babypook
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    #1201746844

    Charlton Heston was always a better stage actor than film actor. He concentrated on Shakespeare and historical dramas on stage. His bombast that hindered his screen presence was quite effective in live theater.

    As Ben-Hur (a role reportedly declined by many including Rock Hudson, Marlon Brando, Kirk Douglas, Paul Newman, and Burt Lancaster), director William Wyler carefully constructed Heston’s performance. Ben-Hur has a life long relationship with Messala (Stephen Boyd). Wyler directed Boyd to play the role with silently longing for his friend but never tell Heston what he was doing. The homoerotic overtones are evident and Ben-Hur’s indifference is compelling.

    The Oscar should have gone to Jack Lemmon for his hilarious work in Some Like It Hot, considered to be one of the great screen comedies. Lemmon himself thought he should have won the award and said so in 1973 when he finally did win a Best Actor Oscar, more for being overdue than exceptional work in Save The Tiger. His speech began, “Well, I tell you, I had a speech prepared…in 1959. I’ve forgotten it.”

    Well, they’re still constipated when it comes to comedic perfs so imagine how stuffed up they were back then……

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    ziggy
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    #1201746875

    One of the best lead actor line-ups of all time if you ask me – and of course the only nominee who wasn’t downright legendary won.

    I would go with Lemmon though. He is so on point in Some Like It Hot it isn’t even real, though the film is a joint effort through and through, and the three leads elevate each other to a ridiculously supreme level of comedy acting (as do all the supporting actors down to the minorest appearance – to think of all the ensemble awards this film would deserve to sweep today), whereas Grant and Stewart are more solely the leaders of their films.

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