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Best Directorial efforts in cinema history

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  • Bill Buchanan
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    #79421

    What were, in your opinion, the best directorial efforts in history. Is there any one movie where the camera placement was not only perfect, it also CONTRIBUTED to telling the story?
    A couple of obvious ones:
    Coppolla for Apocalypse Now
    Hitchcock for Psycho

    And a couple more recent ones:
    PTA for Magnolia
    Nolan for Inception
    Aranofsky for Black Swan
    Spielberg for Schindler’s List (or Saving Private Ryan, which is more revolutionary, I guess…)
    Cuarón for Children of Men

    You can pick any director. You can go Fellini or Joss Whedon (LOL!). You can go Scorsese, Hitchcock, Hawks, Bergman, ANYONE.

    What were the Best Directorial efforts in cinema History?

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    Scottferguson
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    #79423

    To me, that’s just another way of asking what are the best films in history – they’re one and same, at least when we are talking about good movies.

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    Marcus Snowden (The Artist Formerly Known as msnowden1)
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    #79424

    Don’t laugh, but I think Brian de Palma’s direction in Scarface was GREAT!

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    Anonymous
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    #79425

    In my opinion, the best achievements in direction ever:
    Sergio Leone- Good, the Bad, the Ugly
    Stanley Kubrick- 2001: A Space Odyssey
    Martin Scorsese- Raging Bull

    Other Suggestions:
    Francis Ford Coppola- Apoclapyse Now
    David Lean- Lawrence of Arabia
    Alfred Hitchcock- Veritgo
    Ingmar Bergman- Persona
    Paul Thomas Anderson- There Will Be Blood
      
           

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    Trent
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    #79426

    Alfred Hitchcock’s direction of Psycho was sublime.

    Quentin Tarantino’s extremely stylized direction of Pulp Fiction was superb.

    Basically anything from Paul Thomas Anderson’s filmography fits here.

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    Halo_Insider
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    #79427

    Just to list off a whole bunch:

    Frank Capra – It’s A Wonderful Life
     Martin Scorsese – Raging Bull, Taxi Driver, and Goodfellas
    Orson Welles – Citizen Kane
    Francis Ford Coppola – The Godfather (1 and 2), The Conversation   
    John Ford – The Grapes of Wrath and The Searchers
    John Huston – The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (PTA says this was something he was watching while writing There Will Be Blood)
    Elia Kazan – A Streetcar Named Desire and On the Waterfront
    David Lean – Lawrence of Arabia
    Stanley Kubrick – Dr. Strangelove and A Clockwork Orange
    Roman Polanski – Chinatown and The Pianist
    Steven Spielberg – Jaws and ET
    Ridley Scott – Blade Runner
    Milos Forman – Amadeus and One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
    Sergio Leone – Once Upon a Time in America
    Akira Kurosawa – Seven Samurai, Ran, and Rashomon
    David Lynch – Blue Velvet and Mulholland Drive
    Robert Zemeckis – Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
    Spike Lee – Do the Right Thing
    Clint Eastwood – Unforgiven
                    

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    Riley
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    #79428

    To me, that’s just another way of asking what are the best films in history – they’re one and same, at least when we are talking about good movies.

    You do not believe that great directing can be held back at all by a subpar story?

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    Anonymous
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    #79429

    Mike nichols- The Graduate

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    Anonymous
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    #79430

    So many people easily confuse direction with just getting a nice looking movie. NO!

      It’s how you use the camera to tell the story, discover the hidden depths, close-ups, framing, etc. This is why I truly believe PTA is the best filmmaker today and one of the best all-time.

    For example, take the shot in The Master when Freddie meets Dodd for the first time. It’s framed at the door, the interior of the room, which Dodd is in has blackwallpaper, the outiside of the room is white, a symbol of good/evil. Freddie is in the middle. 

    Malick, for example, is the opposite, just simply captures fantastic images. Still a wonderful director, but uses the camera in a different way.
       

       

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    Pieman1994
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    #79431

    It’s not really that at all. That’s more cinematography. Direction has to do with the choices made in making a film. They tell the actors what to do, decide if the sets look good enough, bring out their interpretation of the script, pick the final cut of a film, etc. 

    And best direction and best film are not the same thing. Someone can make really good choices that transcend an otherwise bland story, as thedemondog said, but that doesn’t make their film the best. A director brings the film together, but someone can have lesser direction and still have a better film.  

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    Malick
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    #79432

    Oscar related since 2000:

    Ang Lee – Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon
    Terrence Malick – The Tree of Life
    The Coen Brothers – No Country For Old Men
    Roman Polanski – The Pianist
    Martin Scorsese – Hugo
    Guillermo del Toro – Pan Labyrinth
    David Cronenberg – A History of Violence
    Todd Haynes – Far From Heaven
    Alfonso Cuarón – Y Tu Mamá También
    Todd Field – In The Bedroom
    Pedro Almodóvar – Talk to Her
    Fernando Meirelles – City of God

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    Stardust
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    #79433

    Agreed with professor^
    Some of my picks for direction (shaping the film, vision, feel, etc, making welcome and/or impressive technical/creative choices that reinforce, challenge, adorn, intensify, change perception or sensation, etc etc) —

    Kubrick with Clockwork Orange
    Hitchcock with Rear Window, Vertigo, & Psycho
    Scorsese with Goodfellas & Taxi Driver
    Polanski with Chinatown and The Pianist
    Tarantino with Pulp fiction
    Malick with The Tree of Life
    Nichols with Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf
    Billy Wilder with Sunset Boulevard
    Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner
    Coen Bros with Fargo & No Country For Old Men
    Paul Thomas Anderson with Magnolia, There Will Be Blood, and The Master
    Milos Forman with One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
    Leone with Good Bad & Ugly
    Spielberg with Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Saving Private Ryan
    Aronofsky with Requiem for a Dream
    Fincher with Fight Club, & Benjamin Button (largely for its “art direction”)
    Elia Kazan with Streetcar & On the Waterfront
    George Stevens with A Place in the Sun and Giant

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    Carbon Based Lifeform
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    #79434

    Sometimes, when I am good and stoned, I like think 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY might be the best movie ever.

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    babypook
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    #79435

    Well, I dont have to smoke anything to feel that way.

    Sam Raimi does some amazing things with no money, sound, and use of the camera in his Evil Dead films……

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