Best Picture Actor 1982

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  • RobertPius
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    #194735

    Do you think Gandhi and Kingsley deserved it? 

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    babypook
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    #194737

    I think so, given that year. I dont believe it deserved Art Direction, which could have gone to a worthier effort, Blade Runner. Quest for Fire rightfully won Makeup. And the iconic  Music and Sound awards belongs to E.T.

    The nominees for Visual Effects were stellar that year, and no begrudging the win for E.T once again.

    And since Kingsley is virtually a one-man show in a terrific cast, he is a worthy winner.

    As for Director, superficially at least, Wolfgang Peterson is a foreigner directing a foreign language film. Although, it had the gravitas. E.T. is a sci fi and family friendly. Tootsie is a comedy and The Verdict, although a ‘threat’ as a courtroom drama, was more a showcase for the late great Paul Newman. Very glad James Mason scored the nomination in Supporting btw. My only beef is that they ignored Lindsay Crouse for a brief but show-stopping turn as THE witness.

    So yes. I think the film and Kingsley did. Far from my personal favorite film for the ages however. But the film needed to be made, and with dignity.

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    OnTheAisle
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    #194738

    Thirty years provides reasonable hindsight to question the Academy’s decision.

    I think Best Picture is a no brainer. Gandhi is the best choice. It still is compelling storytelling. Missing and The Verdict are small, quite films that rely on great acting and generating a feeling of indignation. Both achieve their goals but do not have the scope and wonder of the top award. E.T. the Extra Terrestrial was a phenomenon in its day; however, it hasn’t aged well. Spielberg has done much better work. Tootsie is the best runner up. Every performace is spot on. It addresses gender equality in a quite effective way that still resonates. However, it is a comedy and the Academy nominates but doesn’t honor comedy.

    I think the more difficult choice is in Best Actor. Every nominee deserved to win.

    Kingsley is Gandhi. He gives a masterful performance that anchors the entire film, even in its weakest moment. When Candice Bergen wanders in looking like she has just come from a magazine cover shoot and calls herself Margaret Bourke-White, we believe it because Kingsley does.

    Jack Lemmon deserved to win his Oscar for a better performance than in Save the Tiger. He is heartbreaking in Missing. He lets us witness a man’s lifelong values and beliefs be challenged and changed as he slowly learns of the political machinations of the US government that have personal tragic results for him.

    Peter O’Toole never received the Best Actor Oscar he served. As Alan Swann, he is charming, hilarious and touching. He brings great pathos to a screwball comedy in the scene where he parks on a residential street and hides in the back of his chauffeur driven luxury car to watch his daughter ride her bike, too insecure and shamed to greet her.

    Paul Newman deserved to win his Oscar for a better performance than in The Color of Money. Here he brilliantly underplays the life of alcoholic attorney Frank Galvin who takes a medical malpractice case and surprises himself by rediscovering a purpose. Newman avoids grandstanding and allows the change in Galvin to build slowly and quite believably. This character study is one of his best performances.

    Dustin Hoffman deserved to win his second Oscar for a better performance than in Rain Man. He has so much iconic work, but I treasure Tootsie. There have been many movies about acting. Hoffman shows us the craft and the magic. And his final speech to Julie as he justifies his deception is moving, thrilling and insightful. A lesser actor would have played it for laughs. Hoffman and in turn the audience are deeply connected to the reality of Dorothy and her impact on Michael.

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    babypook
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    #194739

    Thirty years provides reasonable hindsight to question the Academy’s decision.

    I think Best Picture is a no brainer. Gandhi is the best choice. It still is compelling storytelling. Missing and The Verdict are small, quite films that rely on great acting and generating a feeling of indignation. Both achieve their goals but do not have the scope and wonder of the top award. E.T. the Extra Terrestrial was a phenomenon in its day; however, it hasn’t aged well. Spielberg has done much better work. Tootsie is the best runner up. Every performace is spot on. It addresses gender equality in a quite effective way that still resonates. However, it is a comedy and the Academy nominates but doesn’t honor comedy.

    I think the more difficult choice is in Best Actor. Every nominee deserved to win.

    Kingsley is Gandhi. He gives a masterful performance that anchors the entire film, even in its weakest moment. When Candice Bergen wanders in looking like she has just come from a magazine cover shoot and calls herself Margaret Bourke-White, we believe it because Kingsley does.

    Jack Lemmon deserved to win his Oscar for a better performance than in Save the TigerHe is heartbreaking in Missing. He lets us witness a man’s lifelong values and beliefs be challenged and changed as he slowly learns of the political machinations of the US government that have personal tragic results for him.

    Peter O’Toole never received the Best Actor Oscar he served. As Alan Swann, he is charming, hilarious and touching. He brings great pathos to a screwball comedy in the scene where he parks on a residential street and hides in the back of his chauffeur driven luxury car to watch his daughter rise his bike, too insecure and shamed to greet her.

    Paul Newman deserved to win his Oscar for a better performance than in The Color of Money. Here he brilliantly underplays the life of alcoholic attorney Frank Galvin who takes a medical malpractice case and surprises himself by rediscovering a purpose. Newman avoids grandstanding and allows the change in Galvin to build slowly and quite believably. This character study is one of his best performances.

    Dustin Hoffman deserved to win his second Oscar for a better performance than in Rain Man. He has so much iconic work, but I treasure Tootsie. There have been many movies about acting. Hoffman shows us the craft and the magic. And his final speech to Julie as he justifies his deception is moving, thrilling and insightful. A lesser actor would have played it for laughs. Hoffman and in turn the audience are deeply connected to the reality of Dorothy and her impact on Michael.

    At least they gave the Oscar to the politically conscience Costa-Gavras. Missing has scenes which reminded me of a modern day Gone With the Wind, when Scarlett steps out of that makeshift hospital and sees the devastation before her. Very very chilling.

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    drenja
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    #194740

    I would go with “Tootsie” for Best Picture since its one of the funniest movies ever made and they really dont give enough credit to comedies. As for best actor, id go with Paul Newman, who in my opinion deserved to win few Oscars but ironicly neither for the movie he actualy won for. It would be close for me between him and Hoffman.

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    ETPhoneHome
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    #194741

    Kingsley absolutely deserved it. One of the greatest performances of all time. As for picture, well, I obviously have a soft spot for a certain homesick alien movie that was ROBBED of the award it deserved. I honestly think it’s Speilberg’s career best movie, and has certainly stood the test of time as a classic, while Gandhi is mostly just remembered for that performance.

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    Eddy Q
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    #194742

    Gandhi deserved 1 out of its 8 Oscars – Best Actor for Ben Kingsley.

    The rest are mostly instances of voters too lazy to look harder and longer at the nominees and resorting to block voting.

    Best Picture should’ve been E.T.

    Best Director, Cinematography and Editing all should’ve gone to Das Boot (and one of the sound awards would’ve been nice too).

    I can tolerate Gandhi’s screenplay win, but it really should’ve been Tootsie.

    Production Design (or Art Direction as it was called then) clearly should have gone to Blade Runner. This was a travesty.

    The costume Oscar belonged to Victor/Victoria. Or even better, Blade Runner again had it been nominated.

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    DominicCobb
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    #194743

    Another vote for Kingsley and ET for Picture.

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    John
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    #194744

    Regarding Best Actor in a Leading Role:

    • Kingsley deserved Best Actor that year
    • Peter O’Toole should have gotten it for The Lion in Winter and his never receiving one is tragic
    • Jack Lemmon should have gotten it for Some Like it Hot or The Apartment before Save the Tiger came along
    • Dustin Hoffman has had stronger roles, starting with The Graduate and continuing with Lenny (even though he didn’t like the film), Kramer vs. Kramer and Rain Man. That’s not to diminish his excellence in Tootsie. Even in his lesser films like Marathon Man and Papillon we get to see his craft as an actor. He’s his own hard act to follow.
    • Paul Newman was excellent in The Verdict but also had stronger roles, starting with Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and continuing with The Hustler, Cool Hand Luke, and The Color of Money. His understated role in The Verdict was still superb though. Like Hoffman, he’s his own hard act to follow.

    Regarding some of the other films and awards:

    • The real power in Sydney Lumet’s The Verdict was in its restraint that kept it understated . . . which was reflected in Paul Newman’s portrayal of the alcoholic attorney . . . as contrasted with the more colorful Cool Hand Luke. We get to see Lumet’s craft in telling a story exceptionally well without having to create a flashy spectacle, which I think was his real forte. He had so many fine films: Serpico, The Pawnbroker, Murder on the Orient Express, Dog Day Afternoon, and The Network. Among his lesser films, Child’s Play (not the Chuckie horror movie), Deathtrap and The Offence show his skill with small casts and limited sets that could make a stage play type story into a movie with ease without making it feel like a filmed stage performance.
    • Steven Spielberg was still young in 1982 with his most powerful films yet to come that overshadow E.T. including Empire of the Sun, Schindler’s List, Amistad, Saving Private Ryan, and . . . [many more]
    • E.T. deserved the visual effects which were so well executed. Attention to detail with production design and visual effects are among Spielberg’s strengths.
    • Wolfgang Petersons’ Das Boot was an excellent film adaptation of a dense and epic length novel. The screenplay captures the essence of serving on and commanding a WWII Diesel submarine from the novel with all its stresses and challenges without getting bogged down.
    • Alan J. Pakula’s adaptation of Sophie’s Choice was another superb film adaptation of a complex novel; Meryl Streep’s performance as Sophie makes the film.
    • Costa-Gavras well deserved the Best Adapted Screenplay award. Missing is reminiscent of State of Siege, which also took a lot of flak. He was eventually vindicated after Congressional hearings revealed the truth about what had been going on in Central and South America. His politically oriented films have been so well researched that they’re almost documentary dramatizations, and he has matched that with his style of cinematography. ZThe Confession, and State of Siege are all as powerful, if not more so as Missing.

    John

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