Best Picture Winners that are about Women

Home // Forums // Movies // Best Picture Winners that are about Women

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
Created
2 years ago
Last Reply
2 years ago
18
replies
744
views
11
users
5
3
2
  • ScandalWife
    Participant
    Joined:
    Sep 6th, 2014
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #193289

    Today, I read an article about how 13 Best Pixture Winners are about women. When I counted the list of Best Picture Winners, I got 25. What did I do wrong? I counted films like “Out of Africa” and “Shakespeare in Love” , so are those films not in the official 13. Also, does anyone know what the 13 they talking about are? Thank you.

    http://www.ew.com/article/2015/08/28/oscar-race-female-roles

    Reply
    CAROL-CHANNING
    Member
    Joined:
    Sep 30th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #193291

    If you count movies where both the main protagonist AND the second largest role are both women, you only have three I believe:

    Chicago
    Terms of Endearment
    All About Eve

    …are there any others? 

    ReplyCopy URL
    ScandalWife
    Participant
    Joined:
    Sep 6th, 2014
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #193292

    I bet those were 3 on the list. But what are the other 10? I mean Gone with the Wind has to be one right?

    ReplyCopy URL
    AMG
    Participant
    Joined:
    Sep 20th, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #193293

    Titanic? It’s all from Roses perspective.
    Million Dollar Baby.
    Driving Miss Daisy?

    Maybe it’s just female focussed films, rather than women as lead, but a leading man still present.

    ReplyCopy URL
    ScandalWife
    Participant
    Joined:
    Sep 6th, 2014
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #193294

    See the problem I am having here. Does a film Driving Miss. Daisy count or not since it’s has a male lead. Also, I have not seen Crash in years so does that movie count. I remember at least 3 big female roles in the film.

    ReplyCopy URL
    mse
    Member
    Joined:
    Oct 1st, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #193295

    Unfortunately there are very few movies where there’s a clear female lead, and with movies like Titanic, it’s still debatable whether or not they should be considered co-led by both the male and female lead, or if the female lead really has that much more of a prominent role. I usually categorize movies that focus on a romance to have male/female co-leads, unless one of them has a strong, separate character arc that the movie focuses on. (I’m thinking more along the lines of Gone with the Wind than Titanic here.)

    I tried to make my own list, but I actually ended up with less than 13 titles at first, until I started adding a few that I didn’t necessarily agree with. I might have missed a few titles as well, since I’ve yet to have seen all the classics, and there might be some inconsistency regarding the parameters I used for each movie.

    It Happened One Night
    Rebecca
    Mrs. Miniver
    Gone with the Wind
    All About Eve
    The Sound of Music
    Terms of Endearment
    Out of Africa
    Driving Miss Daisy
    The Silence of the Lambs
    Titanic
    Chicago
    Million Dollar Baby

    ReplyCopy URL
    Tyler The Awesome Guy
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 19th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #193296

    Inside Out when it wins Best Picture.

    ReplyCopy URL
    nkb325
    Participant
    Joined:
    Feb 6th, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #193297

    See the problem I am having here. Does a film Driving Miss. Daisy count or not since it’s has a male lead. Also, I have not seen Crash in years so does that movie count. I remember at least 3 big female roles in the film.

    Ensemble moves definitely create an issue. There was Sandra Bullock and Thandie Newton with major roles and the Jennifer Esposito in a smaller one. Bullock and Newton’s roles where probably as significant as any of the male roles short of mayve Howard or Cheadle. So are they all co-leads? I mean I believe the cast was all campaigned as supporting? Maybe if there were an equal number of each but the two women were definitely outnumbered by the men, so I’d say it doesn’t count.

    And with the romance movies, yes they are often co-leads but I feel it’s just kind of unavoidable that one is going to get more focus. Yes, when you think about it Kate Winslet and Leo DiCaprio probably had about the same amount of screentime, but Rose as a character had a decent more. The entire story is framed as being told through her perspective, so I would consider Titanic centered on a female role.

    Whereas something like Shakespeare in Love, which is a love story and they are certainly co-leads, was told more from Shakespeare’s perspective, so personally I don’t know if I’d count that as fully woman-centered

    ReplyCopy URL
    Evergreen
    Participant
    Joined:
    Dec 20th, 2013
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #193298

    Suffragette when it wins Best Motion Picture at the Dolby Theater on February 28th 2016.

    ReplyCopy URL
    ScandalWife
    Participant
    Joined:
    Sep 6th, 2014
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #193299

    I just wished the article listed the 13 films.

    ReplyCopy URL
    John
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jun 3rd, 2015
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #193300

    I went through the list of Best Picture winners and this is what I found that clearly had leading women that weren’t jointly sharing the main protagonist role with a leading man:

    • Rebecca
    • Gone with the Wind
    • Mrs. Miniver
    • All About Eve
    • Gigi
    • My Fair Lady
    • The Sound of Music
    • Terms of Endearment
    • Chicago
    • Million Dollar Baby

    Films in which the the leading actress and actor act jointly as protagonists:

    • It Happened One Night (the synergy of Gable and Colber makes this story work)
    • Annie Hall
    • Driving Miss Daisy
    • Titanic
    • Shakespeare in Love

    John

    ReplyCopy URL
    Jake
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jul 2nd, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #193301

    “Crash” has no lead, like “Modern Family” at the Emmys.

    To make it easier, we have to count all Best Actress nominees that appeared in Best Picture winners:

    1928/29. Bessie Love, “The Broadway Melody”
    1931. Irene Dunne, “Cimarron”
    1932/33. Diana Wynyard, “Cavalcade”
    1934. Claudette Colbert, “It Happened One Night” (won)
    1936. Luise Rainer, “The Great Ziegfeld” (won)
    1939. Vivien Leigh, “Gone with the Wind” (won)
    1940. Joan Fontaine, “Rebecca”
    1942. Greer Garson, “Mrs. Miniver”
    1950. Anne Baxter & Bette Davis, “All About Eve”
    1953. Deborah Kerr, “From Here to Eternity”
    1960. Shirley MacLaine, “The Apartment”
    1965. Julie Andrews, “The Sound of Music”
    1975. Louise Fletcher, “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (won)
    1976. Talia Shire, “Rocky”
    1977. Diane Keaton, “Annie Hall” (won)
    1980. Mary Tyler Moore, “Ordinary People”
    1983. Shirley MacLaine & Debra Winger, “Terms of Endearment” (the former won)
    1985. Meryl Streep, “Out of Africa”
    1989. Jessica Tandy, “Driving Miss Daisy” (won)
    1991. Jodie Foster, “The Silence of the Lambs” (won)
    1996. Kristin Scott Thomas, “The English Patient”
    1997. Kate Winslet, “Titanic”
    1998. Gwyneth Paltrow, “Shakespeare in Love” (won)
    1999. Annette Bening, “American Beauty”
    2002. Renee Zellweger, “Chicago”
    2004. Hilary Swank, “Million Dollar Baby” (won)

    That’s 26 films but you can also add 2 to make it 28 – “My Fair Lady” and “Gigi”. “Grand Hotel” can be up for discussions since Greta Garbo certainly wasn’t supporting anyone there but it’s an ensemble with Barrymores having more screentime (or so I remember).

    This number is not very impressive, given that there were 87 ceremonies. But even then several examples feature women as borderline co-leads at best – I think “From Here to Eternity”, “The Apartment”, “One Flew…”,  “Rocky”, “Annie Hall”, “Ordinary People”, “The English Patient”, “Shakespeare…” and “American Beauty” are more about their males than females (haven’t seen pre-World War II winners).

    On the other hand “Gone with the Wind”, “Rebecca”, “Mrs. Miniver”, “Out of Africa”, “Driving Miss Daisy”, “The Silence of the Lambs”, “Titanic” and “Million Dollar Baby” are more centered on their female characters than male.

    “All About Eve”, “Terms of Endearment” and “Chicago” seem to be the one to have no male leads (perhaps you can count Richard Gere as leading for “Chicago” but for me he was supporting, there’s no way it was his character’s story than Velma’s). 

    So there you have your 13 from the article (without seeing those pre-1939):
    1. “Gone with the Wind”
    2. “Rebecca”
    3. “Mrs. Miniver”
    4. “All About Eve”
    5. “Gigi”
    6. “My Fair Lady”
    7. “Terms of Endearment”
    8. “Out of Africa”
    9. “Driving Miss Daisy”
    10. “The Silence of the Lambs”
    11. “Titanic”
    12. “Chicago”
    13. “Million Dollar Baby” 

    ReplyCopy URL
    KyleBailey
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 15th, 2013
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #193302

    I think it is crazy that The Artist doesn’t get remembered in this group. I have no idea why Bejo was in Supporting. She is as much a leading role as Jean Dujardin and both have equal spotlight in the story. 

    ReplyCopy URL
    John
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jun 3rd, 2015
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #193303

    I think it is crazy that The Artist doesn’t get remembered in this group. I have no idea why Bejo was in Supporting. She is as much a leading role as Jean Dujardin and both have equal spotlight in the story. 

    I believe this was started regarding movies about women, not for “shared spotlight” – a category in which The Artist would arguably fall. It’s about the careers of George Valentin and Peppy Miller inextricably intertwined with the fall of Valentin coinciding with the rise of Miller. An argument claiming that it’s a movie about Peppy Miller and her meteoric career rise doesn’t hold up; it’s about both of their careers together.

    Note that I have some objections with Titanic and Silence of the Lambs classed as films about “women” (i.e. the leading actresses’ characters), and Out of Africa wasn’t on my list, but it should have been.

    John

    ReplyCopy URL
    Noé
    Participant
    Joined:
    Feb 20th, 2014
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #193304

    Inside Out when it wins Best Picture.

    That’s what I was mumbling!

     

    ReplyCopy URL
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
Reply To: Best Picture Winners that are about Women

You can use BBCodes to format your content.
Your account can't use Advanced BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.

Similar Topics
Spenser... - Aug 16, 2017
Movies
Tegan - Aug 16, 2017
Movies