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Broadway to Hollywood

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  • seabel
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    Nov 21st, 2012
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    #152574

    The Tony Awards Nominations were announced today. I was reading the nominations list and couldn’t help myself but think that some (a lot) of them are going to be made into movies in the very close future… Which ones? Who will star?

    My eyes are focused on three plays.

    THE COAST OF UTOPIA
    I could see Sean Penn starring in this.

    RED
    Alfred Molina reprising his role.

    THE ASSEMBLED PARTIES
    Julianne Moore and Jane Fonda, please.

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    nkb325
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    #152576

    I’ve only seen Red, and I may be a little bias because I didn’t really enjoy the play, but I don’t think it would play very well on film. It’s only two characters, taking place entirely in one room, doing a lot of screaming and philosophising at each other. I understand things would be changed of course, but I just think it’s too, “theatre-y” I guess is the word I’m looking for. It’s just so minimal in its characters and its setting and even what they actually talk about that i don’t think people would watch it for two hours in a theatre

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    Logan
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    #152577

    That Bryan Cranston show is potentially going to go to cable or film.

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    Anonymous
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    Jan 1st, 1970
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    #152578

    well for RED, eddie redmayne to also reprise his role, he won  a tony for it

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    CAROL-CHANNING
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    #152579

    I’ve only seen Red, and I may be a little bias because I didn’t really enjoy the play, but I don’t think it would play very well on film. It’s only two characters, taking place entirely in one room, doing a lot of screaming and philosophising at each other. I understand things would be changed of course, but I just think it’s too, “theatre-y” I guess is the word I’m looking for. It’s just so minimal in its characters and its setting and even what they actually talk about that i don’t think people would watch it for two hours in a theatre

    I’m probably alone in saying this, but I actually really like it when a movie feels a little “theatre-y” on occassion.  I think minimal characters in a minimal setting is refreshing and unique to see on screen and allows for a lot of creativity.  I think I just sort of love that fine line between reality and non-reality.  The plays were written a certain way for a reason, and I feel like they lose a lot of drama when things like setting and characters get adjusted to fit with what people are used to seeing on film.  I would have LOVED to have seen August: Osage County take place in and around the house for the entirety of the movie like it does in the play.  I didn’t like Carnage, but that’s because I just don’t like the play (interesting premise, blah execution).  I enjoyed how Polanski handled it, though.  The only stage to screen adaptation of a non-musical play I can think of in which the story benefited from the addition of settings and characters is Steel Magnolias, in which a magnificent play was adapted into and even better movie.

    Musicals are a slightly different story, but I do tend to enjoy movie musicals that are criticized for being “stage-y.”  1776 immediately pops into my head as an example.

    I think what I love about adaptations of plays/musicals is seeing how directors for the screen can creatively draw inspiration from the staging of a theatre piece and translate that same vision into a different medium.  It’s exciting when it’s successful.    

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    Vincent Yeoh (aka Vinny)
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    #152580

    I have no problems with a film being stagey if the material is strong and the performances as well.
    The Ealing production of The Importance of Being Earnest remains one of my favorite films, and it is faithful to the stage version.
    The movie version of Joseph Papp’s Pirates of Penzance was filmed as staged.
    Many of Sondheims’ Broadway works have also been filmed as staged.
    And i love them all.
     

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