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Critics’ 2012 10 best lists

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  • Scottferguson
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    #77527

    Major ones starting to come in –

    Owen Gleiberman
    1. Lincoln
    2. Amour
    3. Silver Linings Playbook
    4. Room 237
    5. Zero Dark Thirty
    6. Perks of Being a Wallflower
    7. Killing Them Softly
    8. Argo
    9. Flight
    10. Bernie

    Lisa Schwarzbaum
    1. Zero Dark Thirty
    2. Lincoln
    3. The Master
    4. Amour
    5. Argo
    6. The Gatekeepers
    7. Beasts of the Southern Wild
    8. Skyfall
    9. The Loneliest Planet
    10. How to Survive a Plague

      

    From TIME

    01. Amour
    02. Beasts of the Southern Wild
    03. Life of Pi
    04. Anna Karenina
    05. The Dark Knight Rises
    06. Zero Dark Thirty
    07. Dark Horse
    08. Dragon
    09. Frankenweenie
    10. Invisible War

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    Renaton
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    #77529

    Wow, the Time list is sorta all over the place, huh? I don’t like Gleiberman, but his and Lisa’s both look very interesting. The inclusion of “Perks…” (a film I watched, but thought nothing much of it) and “Killing Me Softly” (which I can see why he included, but seems to be suffering a huge backlash on the States) stand out a bit, but every critic has their own idiosyncrasies and this is what’s interesting about year end lists. And it looks much more interesting than the ones he usually does.

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    allabout oscars
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    #77530

    10 best from film critic of a small Long Island newsletter that I read monthly….always interesting choices…this publication includes film critics, students and independent film makers from Long Island……..

    1. Argo
    2. The intouchables
    3. Anna KARENINA
    4. Lincoln
    5. Amour
    6. The master
    7. SKYFALL
    8. Perks of being a wallflower
    9. Beasts of the southern wild
    10. Flight

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    Scottferguson
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    #77531

    Key thing so far – no mention of Les Mis, which my guess will end up with a Metacritic score in the 70s (just a guess), far below what most BP nominees and nearly all winners get

    None for Django either – one critic I talked to who saw it said it showed a total lack of any new ideas from QT, just a rehash of things he’s done better in the past 

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    allabout oscars
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    #77532

    I think DJANGO will be a total bomb…and les mis will still be big enough for major Oscar nods. I am predicting zero nods for DJANGO…

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    Scottferguson
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    #77533

    Django is going to be solid commercially. QT has a fan base, it will be a major draw as well from black audiences (who make up 15-20% of ticket buyers in the US), early indications are OK reviews. It might not be as big as IB or do less than Weinstein and Sony hope (the are co-producers, Sony has the film outside US/C), but no way it is a total bomb.

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    Renaton
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    #77534

    Yeah, I don’t think “Django” will win and/or be a huge hit. i do think it can do soem damage to other contenders and be a suprise nominee in some categories. I still think a BP nomination is very much possible, especially if it does well with audiences. And one of the actors might get in, and there’s always techs. It will not be a total bomb because, like SF said, he has a loyal audience. I know a lot of people hate Tarantino around here, but he’ll likely do well enough that won’t hurt him in anyway. 

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    babypook
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    #77535

    I think DJANGO will be a total bomb…and les mis will still be big enough for major Oscar nods. I am predicting zero nods for DJANGO…

    Lol! I’ll try to keep my fingers crossed fer ya aaos.

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    allabout oscars
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    #77536

    Sorry..but i dislike TARANTINO more than most film makers..
    I was the minority by despising PULP FICTION
    I hated the KILL BILLS
    and I mildly got thru  INGLORIOUS BASTERDS.
    Ill go kicking and screaming to DJANGO..the cast is
    so unappealing except for WALTZ, who i enjoy…
    FOXX DI CAPRIO, SL JACKSON, IMO 3 of the most over rated actors
    in the business…

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    Anonymous
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    #77537

    http://www.awardsdaily.com/blog/2012/12/06/the-master-tops-peter-travers-top-ten/

    Peter Travers(Rolling Stone) Top Ten:
     1. The Master
     2. Zero Dark Thirty
     3. Beasts of the Southern Wild
     4. Lincoln
     5. Argo
     6. Silver Linings Playbook
     7. Les Miserables
     8. Life of Pi
     9. Moonrise Kingdom
     10. The Dark Knight Rises

     

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    Scottferguson
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    #77538

    Is that a ten best list or predicting the BP nominees?

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    Renaton
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    #77539

    Peter Travers doesn’t watch foreign films or documentaries?

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    Scottferguson
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    #77540

    Well, Les Mis is British

    Peter Travers is known as the biggest quote/ad chaser in the business. He is betting on being on the maximum number of Oscar ads.  

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    Logan
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    #77541

    His list from 2010

    2010:

    1. The Social Network
    2. Inception
    3. The King’s Speech**
    4. True Grit
    5. The Kids Are All Right
    6. 127 Hours
    7. Black Swan
    8. The Fighter
    9. Winter’s Bone
    10. Toy Story 3

    Each was a BP nominee. He’s gross.

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    Logan
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    #77542

    Ann Hornaday (Washington Post) top 10 http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/movies/ann-hornadays-10-best-films-of-2012/2012/12/06/e1457a68-3faf-11e2-bca3-aadc9b7e29c5_story.html :

     

    1. “Zero Dark Thirty” Kathryn Bigelow’s
    taut thriller about the hunt for Osama bin Laden exemplifies the Oscar-winning
    director at the top of her game, working with a script by Mark Boal that not
    only allows viewers to make sense of the complicated intelligence, military and
    foreign policy issues that have animated the past decade, but also creates a
    brand-new cinematic genre: the reported film.

    2. “Lincoln” Steven Spielberg and Tony
    Kushner’s historical drama about the 16th president leaves behind fusty,
    great-man portraiture, instead engaging in a lively game of political cat and
    mouse that bears uncanny contemporary echoes and leaves viewers feeling as if
    they’ve just spent two hours with the shrewd, funny, melancholy — and yes, great
    — man himself.

    3. “The Waiting Room” Peter Nicks’s
    magnificent documentary spends a day in the life of an over-crowded and
    under-resourced hospital emergency room in Oakland, Calif., where a staff of
    compassionate professionals provide care to a startlingly diverse population of
    patients. This subtle, compassionate tableau lifts the veil on a world often
    described in terms of squalor and despair, finding the inherent dignity and
    perseverance therein.

    4. “Monsieur Lazhar” Philippe
    Falardeau’s affecting drama about an Algerian immigrant teaching in a Montreal
    elementary school could have gone wrong in so many sappy, sentimental or maudlin
    ways. Thanks to Falardeau’s clear-eyed direction and a quietly galvanizing
    performance by Mohamed Fellag in the title role, it goes straight and simply for
    the heart, and its aim is unerringly true. Pint-sized co-stars Sophie Nelisse
    and Emilien Neron joined Pierce Gagnon (“Looper”), Jared Gilman and Kara Hayward
    (“Moonrise Kingdom”), and “The Impossible’s” Tom Holland,
    Oaklee Pendergast and Samuel Johnson as young actors delivering performances of
    astonishing maturity.

    5. “Middle of Nowhere” Ava DuVernay’s finely
    calibrated drama about a woman navigating life while her husband is in prison
    featured a breakout performance by lead actress Emayatzy Corinealdi; its
    unforced, restrained tone was enhanced by the expressive cinematography of
    Howard University alumnus Bradford Young, who also shot two 2012 10-best
    runners-up, “Restless City” and “Pariah.”

    6. “This Is Not a Film” Jafar Panahi’s essay film
    about living under house arrest in Iran uses Brechtian staging, blurred lines
    between documentary and drama, and an iPhone to explore the notion of physical
    and political boundaries, the aesthetic and technological contours of cinema,
    and the enduring power of self-expression.

    7. “Argo” Ben Affleck’s absorbing,
    thoroughly entertaining thriller about a little-known chapter of the Iran
    hostage crisis strikes a tricky tonal balance between history lesson,
    adventure-action and showbiz satire. Along with such runners-up as “The Grey,” “Looper” and “Magic Mike,” it proved that genre pictures don’t have to
    be disposable but can channel genuine thoughtfulness, ingenuity and
    old-fashioned chops.

    8. “Margaret” Kenneth Lonergan’s epic
    coming-of-age tale, about a Manhattan teenager sent into an ethical tailspin
    after being involved in a tragic bus accident, took years to arrive on the
    screen. What turned out to be a sprawling, passionate, stubbornly digressive
    masterwork was worth the wait.

    9. “Anna Karenina” Director Joe Wright took
    a big chance when he staged the adaptation of a beloved literary classic as
    light opera, largely within the confines of a tiny theater. The conceit worked,
    with the inherent theatricality of Tolstoy’s story and imperial St. Petersburg
    society coming to the fore, as well as the novel’s alternately rigorous and
    poetic moral sensibility. “Anna” joined such similarly risky fare as “Cloud
    Atlas” and “Holy Motors” in suggesting that cinematic ambition,
    audacity and vision aren’t dead yet.

    10. “Amour” Michael Haneke’s technically
    flawless, emotionally devastating drama about an elderly couple facing illness
    and death was part of an encouraging trend this year in surprisingly honest
    depictions of aging, from the frank sexuality of the admittedly uneven “Hope Springs” to Dustin Hoffman’s directorial debut,
    “Quartet.” On behalf of grown-ups everywhere, to an industry otherwise obsessed
    with youth: Thanks for caring. More, please!

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