Director/Picture split

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  • RobertPius
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    #141804

    Is this the first time it has been a predicted event? Most times it seemed to happen when a director got left out like last year or with Driving Miss Daisy or a surprise like with Polanski.

    What about 1972 was the split a surprise? Was Fosse as director or The Godfater as Picture the surprise? 

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    Anthony
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    #141806

    I think there were years where it was seen as a possibility. One that comes to mind is 2004 when you had The Aviator and Million Dollar Baby. Some thought that maybe the surge of overdue love for Martin Scorsese could propel him to a win but the Million Dollar Baby could win Picture….or the opposite scenario. My opinion at the time was that if Eastwood won Director then it would also win Best Picture, which ended up happening.

    As we all know, Scorsese finally won two years later but I felt he did a better job with The Aviator (not a common opinion) and wish he had won Picture/Director for that instead….but speaking of his actual win, that was another year where there was a possible chance for a split because Little Miss Sunshine became a darkhorse with its PGA win but then its directors were snubbed. You could say it was an outside chance that a split could’ve occurred there.

    With the year of Braveheart, I think some felt Sense & Sensibility, Apollo 13, or even Babe could pull off Best Picture despite the former two famously being snubbed in Director, with Howard winning the DGA for Apollo 13 despite it. I was too young to follow the race at that time so I can’t really comment in detail on it.

    As for 1972, all articles I have read said that Fosse winning wasn’t expected (even though I actually thought he was very deserving of the win).

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    endaugust
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    #141807

    1972 was an interesting case.

    The Godfather funnily enough was not a frontrunner in the early awards round.  It didn’t win any of the top critics groups awards – National Board of Review gave it to Cabaret (as well as to its director); New York gave it to Cries and Whisper (as well as to its director) and National Society of Film Critics to The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeousie (as well to as its director).  LA Film Critics weren’t around then.  The Godfather was released early in the year (March) and maybe by the time the awards season came around, critics were tired of it, maybe backlashes?

    The Godfather did end up winning the Globes and the Guild awards.  It and Cabaret went head to head when Oscar nominations were announced, both got 10 noms each.

    On Oscar night it went 0-7 to Cabaret the whole night until the Adapted Screenplay.  Fosse won BD (it was considered as a mild surprise b/c Coppola won the DGA and the momentum had swung to the Godfather’s way toward the end of the awards season).

    And as we all know, Cabaret’s streak ended at #8.  And Godfather won 2 more, including BP.  Cabaret won 8/10 but lost the bigger prizes to Godfather.

    While the night went unconventionally, it wasn’t considered shocking, given how the precursors went. 

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    Benedick
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    #141808

    Before my time, but I think a split must have been expected in 1967, when Mike Nichols won the NYFC, Globe and the DGA for Directing The Graduate, but In the Heat of the Night won the NYFC and Globe for Best Picture. 

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    endaugust
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    #141809

    1967 was also eerily similar to this year’s.

    Nichols was a shoo-in for BD, yet his film wasn’t the frontrunner to win BP.  The film with a racial theme was.  It’s also interesting to note that ITHOTN was directed by a non-American as well, the Canadian Norman Jewison.

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