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Dream Movie Adaptations of Novels

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  • TomHardys
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    #146247

    I don’t know if this thread has been created before in the past (and if that’s the case I apologize in advance) but I’m really really curious about this particular subject: which novels would you love to see adapted to a movie? And directed by whom and which would be the perfect cast?

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    babypook
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    #146249

    Well, seeing how you’re asking for our own dream adaptations, it’s time to make another Richard 3 film, and not your usual Tudor-type Shakespearean/ThomasMoore versions either.

    They’ve just found his body. There’s an audience for it. It’s time imo.

    Which novel? Why, The Sunne in Splendour.

    But hey, that’s me.

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    Jake
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    #146250

    I’m all for another Agatha Christie vehicle but making another remake of “Murder on the Orient Express” is pointless since Sidney Lumet did so stellar job with it in 1974. I’d rather have another “And Then There Were None” with all A-stars cast and original ending. I know there were several film versions of this story but all were lacking something. The Russian one from late 1980s was the best. 

    I would also love to see film version of “Crime and Punishment” by Fyodor Dostoevsky. I don’t care whether it would be English or Russian as long as it would remain faithful to the setting and time period. Russian version done at least decently should be unstoppable for Best Foreign Language Film Oscar.

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    babypook
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    #146251

    Hey, I want Andrew Garfield in Lead. Direct? Tom Hooper…kidding, kidding. Someone with an ‘edge’ who doesnt need a colouring book next to him/her while they direct. I’ll say Tony Gilroy or David Fincher. Who plays Anne? M Wasikowska. His mom? Janet McTeer.His brother Edward? Gotta be someone hotter than hell.

    Lol. Ok; I’ll stop now.

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    Icky
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    #146252

    A re-do of the initially buthered The Hours.

    I still think Anna Karenina could make a great film.

    Lite in August, one of those impossible to film novels where an adaptation would surely disappoint, but it’s my favorite novel, so I want it.

    No one has done anything special with Hemmingway. 

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    Tyler The Awesome Guy
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    #146253

    There’s this great novel by S.E. Hinton called “Hawkes’ Harbor” that I read when I was younger and I absolutely loved. If someone like Scorsese could adapt it into a movie, I would totally see it.

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    Entertain-me
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    #146254

    Upton Sinclair’s “The Jungle”
    J.D. Salinger’s “The Catcher in the Rye” 
    Sinclair Lewis’ “Babbitt”
    Michael Chabon’s “The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay”

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    nkb325
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    #146255

    I’m all for another Agatha Christie vehicle but making another remake of “Murder on the Orient Express” is pointless since Sidney Lumet did so stellar job with it in 1974. I’d rather have another “And Then There Were None” with all A-stars cast and original ending. I know there were several film versions of this story but all were lacking something. The Russian one from late 1980s was the best. 

    I would also love to see film version of “Crime and Punishment” by Fyodor Dostoevsky. I don’t care whether it would be English or Russian as long as it would remain faithful to the setting and time period. Russian version done at least decently should be unstoppable for Best Foreign Language Film Oscar.

    YES! Christie is probably my favorite author and I’m just waiting for an all-star adaptation to come out, although who knows if it will. And I agree, it should definitely use the original ending.

    Another one of my favorites of hers is Crooked House. As soon as I finished reading I got the sense that I could totally see it as a movie, only to find out that it is being made into one, by Julian Fellowes…
    Romeo and Juliet and The Tourist both got bad to horrible reviews, Downton Abbey had a good first season and ok second season, but has gone to complete shit, and despite the oscar win I though Gosford Park was vastly overrated (stings even more it beat memento). It was like a cheap knockoff of a Christie novel, using all the tropes that she invented but without any of stakes, intrigue, deception, and even self-awareness that Christie always did so well. I really hope he doesn’t ruin this one. 

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    Gabriel
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    #146256

    Steppenwolf by Hermann Hesse. It was adapted into a film in 1974 by director Fred Haines, and starred Max von Sydow.in the lead role. But wasn’t that good, imo. The novel is really trippy/psychedelic with lots of Lynchian elements, and so I feel like it’s dying for a new adaptation by….wait for it….David Lynch.

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    babypook
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    #146257

    Do you think it would help if the audience took some acid? I know it helped me.

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    Scottferguson
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    #146258

    It’s a fairly basic axiom of cinema that great novels do not great movies make. Most great movies that come from novels have as their source lesser ones – Vertigo, The Searchers, Dr Stangelove, The Godfather to just scratch the surface. The greater the novel, the greater the conflict with the novelist’s vision. There are exceptions (Frank Borzage’s A Farewell to Arms for one, maybe The Grapes of Wraths), but usually this conflict defeats a movie.

    Babbitt was done by Warners in 1934 with Guy Kibbee. Crime and Punishment multiple times, the best of which is from the USSR in 1969, directed by Lev Kulezhnakov. The great Josef von Sternberg made an odd version for Paramount in 1935.

    This story sort of exemplifies the difference between novels and film. The great director Howard Hawks was golfing buddies with Ernest Hemingway. Hawks bet Hemingway that he could make a great movie out of his worst novel. Hemingway suggested one title – and Hawks made it into the masterpiece To Have and Have Not (with the script by William Faulkner no less).

    Faulkner himself is close to unfilmable. It’s been tried a few times, mostly to inglorious failure, although his less Intruder in the Dust turned out fine.

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    Logan
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    #146259

    It’s been a while since I saw or read To Kill a Mockingbird, but I think the film version turned out rather well.

    Don’t know if Rosemary’s Baby was a great book.

    Agnieszka Holland did wonders with The Secret Garden. 

    —and since 50 Shades is coming out, I’d take Gus Van Sant’s spin on some “Phil Andros” novels.
     

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    ETPhoneHome
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    #146260

    A good adaptation of a Gabriel Garcia Marquez book is overdue. My favourite would be the lesser known Chronicle of a Death Foretold, but One Hundred Years of Solitude would be good too. They recently did one for Love in the Time of Cholera, and it was fairly well-received.

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    vinny
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    #146261

    King Lear:

    Lear: Patrick Stewart
    Goneril: Catherine Zeta Jones
    Regan: Natalie Portman
    Cordelia: Amanda Seyfried
    Duke of Albany: Jude Law
    Duke of Cornwall: Leonardo DiCaprio
    Gloster: not sure who but it’s gotta be someone big. 

    All the rest could be newbies.            

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    Cheshire
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    #146262

    David Fincher directed “The Girl who Played with Fire” & “The Girl who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest”

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