GRAVITY – Thread 2

Home // Forums // Movies // GRAVITY – Thread 2

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 326 total)
Created
4 years ago
Last Reply
4 years ago
325
replies
5555
views
62
users
68
46
35
  • Scottferguson
    Participant
    Joined:
    Sep 26th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #114396

    I can’t wait to hear reactions from the many people who have yet to see this, whatever they – great, good or not so good. It’s terrific to see this film generate so much response.

    Reply
    KennerLeaguer
    Participant
    Joined:
    Dec 26th, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #114398

    Saw it at a 10 PM show on Thursday night before its widespread release on Friday. I loved it. I don’t agree with James Cameron that it is the best space film (2001 still wins), but it is definitely the best space movie I’ve seen in ages. For whatever that’s worth. A couple of scenes involving Sandra talking to herself to pump herself up came across as a bit hokey and the script itself was a litlle too bare bones. That’s why I give it a 9 out of 10 instead of a perfect score.

    One thing to point out that may make me rethink if I’m giving it too high a score: I want to see the movie again with a large crowd but I’m not sure if I ever want to see it on DVD/blu ray/netflix streaming/computer/etc. This film is a spectacle that should be seen on 3D IMAX. But the story/script might not be good enough to make me want to see it downgraded on a smaller screen when it eventualy hit the store shelves.

    ReplyCopy URL
    TWC
    Member
    Joined:
    Sep 27th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #114399

    Gravity is a technical marvel.  I saw it in 3D Imax last night, and I’m not sure I’ve ever had that kind of movie experience before.  The way it’s filmed, you feel like you’re there in space.  In fact, people in the theatre were feeling sick, because you actually feel like you’re spnning when Dr. Ryan Stone is drifiting after being detached. When Clooney tells Bullock to sip instead of gulp oxygen when her tank is quickly emptying, the audience does the same.

    This movie is a lock for some if not all of the technical awards. Not sure how anything else can beat it there. It’s going to be a trendsetting film in that regard. 

    I loved both Bullock and Clooney in this.  It’s the only Sandra performance where I forgot that she was “Sandra Bullock”.  She was great, and really carried the bulk of the film.  Clooney was great in his smaller part as well. 

    See this in 3D, I’m not sure it has the same effect otherwise.  It’s a total experience.  

    ReplyCopy URL
    Stardust
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 13th, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #114400

    Gravity is a technical marvel.  I saw it in 3D Imax last night, and I’m not sure I’ve ever had that kind of movie experience before. The way it’s filmed, you feel like you’re there in space. This movie is a lock for some if not all of the technical awards. Not sure how anything else can beat it there.”

    Ditto.

     

    I saw this again in IMAX and the experience did not diminish one bit. I agree that this might not hold up as well watching it on the small screen, which is unfortunate; I hope everyone (including Academy members) experiences it on the big screen, preferably in IMAX. God that last scene, (SPOILER) when she lies down and grabs the Earth, the dirt, and then slowly rises up is magnificent. Bullock delightful. Still marveling at the tehcnical wonder. 

    ReplyCopy URL
    AviChristiaans
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jul 26th, 2013
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #114401

    Regarding the limitations this film will have with Academy members not viewing it in 3D/IMAX:

    There have been two major private screenings for Academy Members the past two weeks.

    http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/goldstandard/la-et-mn-gravity-academy-oscars-20131006,0,1705710.story

    Academy members find themselves in ‘Gravity’s’ pull, too

    Neighborhood theaters weren’t the only places turning away moviegoers looking to see “Gravity” this weekend.

    Academy members packed the roughly 1,000-seat Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills on Saturday night to see Alfonso Cuaron’s spectacular space survival story, forcing staff to rebuff those late-comers arriving near the movie’s start time.

    The evening’s turnaway crowd was all the more impressive given that those attending came for just the movie. Most academy showings feature a post-screening Q&A with the filmmakers and actors, and the discussions often help fill the seats. (Academy members can sometimes seem as starstruck as the tourists shuffling along Hollywood Boulevard.) On Saturday, the film was the event, and judging from the applause when the credits rolled, voters found much to appreciate.

    Taken together with the film’s imposing weekend box-office numbers (the biggest October debut ever, $55.6 million) and the critical raves greeting its opening, “Gravity” seems poised to be a major player in this year’s Oscar race. The visual effects award is probably being engraved as you read this. Nominations for sound mixing and sound editing would seem assured and five-time Oscar nominee Emmanuel Lubezki should have a strong chance to finally win the Academy Award for cinematography, a trophy he should have already won at least a couple of times for his phenomenal work.

    Meanwhile, Sandra Bullock has received better reviews for her turn as the film’s isolated astronaut, a virtual one-woman show, than she did for “The Blind Side,” the movie that won her the lead actress Oscar four years ago. It’s a role that serves both her intellect and energy and, given the mental and physical demands of the shoot (long periods of isolation in a 9-foot-by-9-foot light box or hanging from 20 foot ceilings), Bullock’s work here offers plenty of different ways to appeal to voters.

    The buzz surrounding the movie won’t hurt her cause, either. People in the industry are passionate about “Gravity. Tweets like this one from filmmaker (and geek god) Edgar Wright illustrate how a certain segment of Hollywood is bowing before Cuaron’s ground-breaking, 3-D movie. (James Cameron calls it the “best space film ever made.”) The overflow crowd at this weekend’s academy screening demonstrates that members not only want to see the movie, but they want to see it now

    and on the big screen, not a DVD screener. That’s a good sign, both for the film and filmmaking itself

     

    ReplyCopy URL
    AviChristiaans
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jul 26th, 2013
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #114402

    The way forward for Warner Bros now is to get as many Academy Members as possible into private screenings of Gravity, in 3D/IMAX theaters.

    With 2 screenings in New York and Los Angeles already, Warner Bros needs to capatilise on rolling out as many screenings as possible, that way when DVD screeners get underway later this year, Gravity won’t have to rely on them.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Stardust
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 13th, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #114403

    Emmanuel Lubezki should have a strong chance to finally win the Academy Award for cinematography, a trophy he should have already won at least a couple of times for his phenomenal work.”

    No kidding..

     

     

    “The overflow crowd at this weekend’s academy screening demonstrates that members not only want to see the movie, but they want to see it now and on the big screen, not a DVD screener. That’s a good sign, both for the film and filmmaking itself.

     

    Happy to hear that. 

    ReplyCopy URL
    AviChristiaans
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jul 26th, 2013
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #114404

    Can ‘Gravity’ Splashdown on Stage at the Oscars?

    http://www.thewrap.com/can-gravity-splashdown-stage-oscars/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=can-gravity-splashdown-stage-oscars

    Academy voters filled a huge theater for the Alfonso Cuaron movie’s official AMPAS screening, and left little doubt that it’ll be a multiple nominee

    Can “Gravity” boldly go where no space movie has gone before, to the stage of the Academy Awards?

    One Saturday screening of Alfonso Cuaron’s groundbreaking adventure suggested that it’ll definitely get a lot of tickets to the ball, but was less conclusive as to whether the film can emerge as the night’s big winner.

    The 1,000 Academy members (and guests) who jammed the huge Samuel Goldwyn Theater for the film’s official AMPAS screening on Saturday night might have paled next to the millions who paid to see the film in multiplexes around the country, but they were a crucial audience for a film that has a chance to buck the Academy’s long-standing reluctance to fully embrace sci-fi and special effects films.

     

    After all, Stanley Kubrick’s visionary “2001: A Space Odyssey” was not nominated for Best Picture, and its only Oscar was for special visual effects. (“Oliver!” was named Best Picture that year.)

    In subsequent years, “Star Wars” was beaten by “Annie Hall,” “The Right Stuff” by “Terms of Endearment,” “Apollo 13” by “Braveheart,” “Avatar” by “The Hurt Locker.” No “Star Trek” movie has ever been nominated for picture, director, acting or writing.

    And even though a good number of us thought Cuaron’s previous movie, the down-to-earth but futuristic drama “Children of Men,” was the best film of 2006, it was shut out of the Oscar picture, director and acting races, and didn’t win any of the three categories for which it was nominated.

    So history suggests that “Gravity” faces long odds – although as Guy Lodge wrote in a recent HitFix panel that discussed whether the film could win the top Oscar, the conventional wisdom was that no horror film could win until “The Silence of the Lambs” won, and no fantasy could win until “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King” won.

    Lodge also pointed out that “Gravity” isn’t really sci-fi at all, not in the way that “2001” or “Avatar” were – it’s a human survival drama set in a recognizable present, and the fact that it takes place in outer space only makes the technical achievement that much more spectacular.

    So the history of space movies at the Oscars is perhaps less important than the competition “Gravity” is going up against this year – competition that this year includes the wrenching drama “12 Years a Slave,” which could overcome being tough to watch by virtue of the fact that it’s a landmark exploration of an important subject.

    Also in the race: John Lee Hancock’s “Saving Mr. Banks,” a story about Hollywood (as were the last two Best Picture winners, “Argo” and “The Artist”) that has reportedly left most early viewers in tears, and David O. Russell’s “American Hustle,” which has released some eye-catching posters and had a couple of very quiet research screenings near Los Angeles in the last couple of weeks.

    The AMPAS screening of “12 Years a Slave” doesn’t take place for another week, and “Saving Mr. Banks” and “American Hustle” have yet to be scheduled. So for now, Academy members were more eager to see “Gravity” than anything else this awards season – although the Goldwyn seats more than 1,000 people, it was completely filled, and some members were turned away.

    According to voters who frequent the screenings, this is the first time the theater has been over capacity this year, putting “Gravity” in a class with last year’s screenings of “Argo” and “Lincoln,” at which members were turned away. (Last weekend’s screening of “Captain Phillips” was packed, but nobody was turned away.)

    Applause at the end of the film was resounding, but one member said it fell short of being as “thunderous” as it was for “Argo,” “Lincoln” and “Les Miserables” last year.

    One caveat: Since the Academy began holding post-screening Q&As with the cast and crew of the films they screen, the amount of applause has been skewed by the presence of talent. Unlike, say, Sunday’s screening of “All Is Lost,” which featured a post-screening Q&A with star Robert Redford and director J.C. Chandor, and unlike those three screenings from last year, the “Gravity” screening did not include a Q&A, which meant its reaction wasn’t artificially boosted by members trying to be nice to the talent in attendance.

    The consensus from those in attendance is that the film is a lock in the Best Visual Effects category, that Sandra Bullock is a formidable Best Actress contender and that the film will be a Best Picture nominee.

    You can certain add a number of other categories – directing, film editing, production design, sound editing and mixing – which ought to make the film one of the year’s most-nominated features.

    As for whether it can pick up the momentum to actually beat “12 Years a Slave” and the other contenders, that’s a trickier question, and one that isn’t answered by one Academy screening, a bunch of rave reviews and a great first-weekend gross.

    I have it ranked second on my list of likeliest winners, behind “12 Years,” and I didn’t change the order after seeing the film a second time and hearing about its Academy screening.

    But it’s still early. Cuaron’s movie had an impressive launch and just might have the right stuff to go all the way – but it’s safe to say that “Gravity” faces lots of chances to end up lost in space before its splashdown at the Dolby Theatre on March 2.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Tye-Grr
    Member
    Joined:
    Nov 5th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #114405

    Gravity is a technical marvel.  I saw it in 3D Imax last night, and I’m not sure I’ve ever had that kind of movie experience before. The way it’s filmed, you feel like you’re there in space. This movie is a lock for some if not all of the technical awards. Not sure how anything else can beat it there.”

    Ditto.

     

    I saw this again in IMAX and the experience did not diminish one bit. I agree that this might not hold up as well watching it on the small screen, which is unfortunate; I hope everyone (including Academy members) experiences it on the big screen, preferably in IMAX. God that last scene, (SPOILER) when she lies down and grabs the Earth, the dirt, and then slowly rises up is magnificent. Bullock delightful. Still marveling at the tehcnical wonder. 

    I completely agree on that scene. It’s such a powerful moment. It brought the whole (SPOILERS) rebirth theme to a satisfying conclusion, after she curls up in the ISS in the fetal position. From that point on, it really was about the rebirth of her character as a human being, finding the will to live, to survive. When she swims to the shore and slowly stands to walk again, it hit me in the gut. (END SPOILERS) I’m finally seeing it again later this week. I can’t wait. 

    ReplyCopy URL
    Viv
    Participant
    Joined:
    May 9th, 2013
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #114406

    Gravity’s likely going to walk away with lots of noms and no wins except in the tech categories. Meh. I have it making about $225 million at the box office. It’s not going to pass Inception (which had a bigger opening weekend and a better drop from Sunday to Monday) and it’s only doing pretty good, not great in the foreign market. It’s also going to lose most of it’s 3D and IMax screens fairly soon. 

    I actually wouldn’t be surprised if Saving Mr. Banks somehow ended up being 12 Years a Slave biggest competitor as we get closer to the Oscars. The screenplay is excellent and there’s nothing that Hollywood loves more than movies about Hollywood and we’re rapidly approaching the 50th Anniversary of Mary Poppins. 

    ReplyCopy URL
    Scottferguson
    Participant
    Joined:
    Sep 26th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #114407

    I haven’t seen Monday’s #s yet, but Inception played in the summer when weekdays are much better than in the middle of October. Its first Monday was about 13% of the weekend. I’ll make an assessment of what Gravity’s numbers suggest (and compare it to other fall, not summer weekends) when I see the figure later.

    And the comparison between Inception and Gravity for Oscars omits of course that critical response does have a factor with the Oscars, and Gravity’s reviews are vastly better, and has a chance of winning best film and best director from NY/LA/NSFC based on them, which Inception didn’t. That’s part of the X factor that could help its chances. Also, being a fall picture, and grossing well and having potential momentum because of that is also a difference.

    Viv and I don’t disagree that Gravity is not the favorite for any of the top 8 Oscars, although I think actress and director are competitive and best picture is not impossible. But I don’t think Inception is a good comparison, and Gravity is much better positioned than that film was.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Viv
    Participant
    Joined:
    May 9th, 2013
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #114408

    I was only comparing it in terms of the Box Office, not Oscar potential and Gravity is going to lose IMax screens to Captain Phillips this weekend, then 3D and IMax screens to both Captain Phillips and Enders Game, and then almost all of their 3D screens to Thor and Enders Game and have to share IMax screens. When 80% of your gross comes from 3D screenings and you’re going to lose a lot of those in less than a month, it might not have legs quite as long as people were expecting. Also yes, Inception came out in the summer, but it also didn’t have the bonus of inflated 3D ticket prices so I still think the films are about even. 

    ReplyCopy URL
    AviChristiaans
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jul 26th, 2013
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #114409

    Warner Bros has booked the majority(if not all) of the 3D/IMAX theaters for the whole of October, so no, it will not be losing any of that soon. Only from November onwards.

    Internationally, Gravity was released to a select few countries, and it will roll out to more countries in the coming weeks. Unlike Inception that rolled out worldwide the week of it’s release. So obviously Inception had a bigger worldwide opening, apart from the fact that it was also released during Summer.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Tye-Grr
    Member
    Joined:
    Nov 5th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #114410

    I was only comparing it in terms of the Box Office, not Oscar potential and Gravity is going to lose IMax screens to Captain Phillips this weekend, then 3D and IMax screens to both Captain Phillips and Enders Game, and then almost all of their 3D screens to Thor and Enders Game and have to share IMax screens. When 80% of your gross comes from 3D screenings and you’re going to lose a lot of those in less than a month, it might not have legs quite as long as people were expecting. Also yes, Inception came out in the summer, but it also didn’t have the bonus of inflated 3D ticket prices so I still think the films are about even. 

    These are good points.

    I wonder actually if ‘Captain Phillips’ may best ‘Gravity’ this weekend? Interest in this film seems to be very high, higher than I first gave it credit for. I know I’ll be seeing it. 

    Regardless though, I’m sure ‘Gravity’ will be a success. I honestly don’t think it’ll effect it’s chances with Oscar too much. If they like something more, they like something more; it likely has little or nothing to do with it’s box office.  

    ReplyCopy URL
    Viv
    Participant
    Joined:
    May 9th, 2013
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #114411

    AviChristiaans,
    1. You do see that I said less than a month right? You do know that October ends in less than a month right (today is the 8th)? Ok. Them booking 3D screens for October has nothing to do with what I said. Enders game comes out November 1st and Thor comes out November 8th. It has already given up some IMax screens to Captain Phillips and will continue to do so. It will give up A LOT of 3D screens to Enders Game and Thor when they come out. 

    2. Inception did not roll out worldwide the week of it’s release.  It had a limited opening it’s first week and then expanded the next week. It did GREAT even in that limited opening. What you said is incorrect. Here is the correct information:

    http://boxofficemojo.com/news/?id=2866&p=s.htm
    After a limited opening last weekend, Inception expanded in to 38 territories and led the way overseas. Thanks to huge openings in the United Kingdom and Spain, Toy Story 3 also had an impressive weekend. Last week’s winner Shrek Forever After came in third place, whileThe Twilight Saga: Eclipse continued to rapidly lose audience share. 

    ReplyCopy URL
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 326 total)
Reply To: GRAVITY – Thread 2

You can use BBCodes to format your content.
Your account can't use Advanced BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.

Similar Topics
SN - Aug 20, 2017
Movies
Freeman... - Aug 20, 2017
Movies