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Hello, My Name is Doris

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  • 24Emmy
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    #182329

    Hello, My Name is Doris premieres at the SXSW Film Festival on Saturday.

     

    After the death of her mother, Doris, an isolated 60-year-old woman, becomes motivated by a self-help seminar to romantically pursue a younger coworker at a hip Brooklyn clothing company. As she finds ways to connect with John (going to an electronica concert, hanging out in hipster coffee shops..), her authentic retro style thrusts her into the spotlight of the local hipster social scene and she soon gets caught up in the world of chocolate bar haikus and rooftop knitting clubs. But her other relationships suffer as a result of her new found popularity and Doris has to realize that what she wants isn’t necessarily what she needs.

     

    Director: Michael Showalter

    Producer: Daniela Taplin Lundberg, Riva Marker, Daniel Crown, Michael Showalter, Jordana Mollick, Kevin Mann

    Screenwriter: Laura Terruso, Michael Showalter

    Cinematographer: Brian Burgoyne

    Editor: Robert Nassau

    Production Designer: Melanie Jones

    Additional Credits: Costume Designer: Rebecca Gregg, Music Supervisor: Andy Gowan

    Principal Cast: Sally Field, Max Greenfield, Beth Behrs, Wendi McLendon-Covey, Stephen Root, Elizabeth Reaser, Jack Antonoff, Natasha Lyonne, Tyne Daly

     

    First clip — http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EvHT-QPFqek

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    Gone_Guy
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    #182331

    That was beyond hilarious! How those two managed to get through that scene without laughing is worthy of awards recognition in itself. 

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    24Emmy
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    #182332

    That was beyond hilarious! How those two managed to get through that scene without laughing is worthy of awards recognition in itself. 

     

    Ha. Yeah. I can’t wait to see the rest. I’ve said this before, but I hope this is Sally Field’s Something’s Gotta Give. It’s a joke that she only has 3 Oscar nominations.

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    M
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    #182333

    I hope this is Sally Field’s Something’s Gotta Give. It’s a joke that she only has 3 Oscar nominations.

    She has two. Nomination count is meaningless when you have multiple awards.

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    24Emmy
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    #182334

    [quote=”24Emmy”]I hope this is Sally Field’s Something’s Gotta Give. It’s a joke that she only has 3 Oscar nominations.

    She has two. Nomination count is meaningless when you have multiple awards.[/quote]

     

    That might be your opinion, but it’s not mine. An actor is worthy of more nominations regardless of how many wins they have.

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    Berlin2002
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    #182335

    [quote=”24Emmy”]I hope this is Sally Field’s Something’s Gotta Give. It’s a joke that she only has 3 Oscar nominations.

    She has two. Nomination count is meaningless when you have multiple awards.[/quote]

    Field has 3 nominations :  ” Norma Rae “, ” Places In The Heart ” and ” Lincoln “.
    She has two wins under belt and one loss.

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    Berlin2002
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    #182336

    This looks like a hoot. I’m in. Although at first glance with her and those glasses, I thought : Sybil has a new personality.
    I’m not familiar with this one but she looks like fun.

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    24Emmy
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    #182337

    Ramin Setoodeh @RaminSetoodeh  1h1 hour ago

    Hello, My Name Is Doris‘ features the best performance from Sally Field in a decade (or more).

     

    Ramin Setoodeh @RaminSetoodeh  1h1 hour ago

    Hello, My Name is Doris‘ is Sally Field’s Diane Keaton/’Something’s Gotta Give’ moment.

     

     

     

    HenriMazza @HenriMazza 1h1 hour ago

    It would be impossible to not love HELLO, MY NAME IS DORIS. So good.

      

    Michael Mohan @michaelmohan 1h1 hour ago

    A well deserved standing ovation for Sally Field for HELLO MY NAME IS DORIS. Such a sweet, funny,…

     

    Meredith Borders @xymarla 1h1 hour ago

    Never seen a more enthusiastic or better-deserved standing O than the one the magical Sally Field just got for HELLO, MY NAME IS DORIS

     

    Ramin Setoodeh @RaminSetoodeh 1h1 hour ago

    Sally Field on reading the script for ‘Hello, My Name is Doris‘: “This blew my skirt way up.”

     

    serial menace @cullenbound2 1h1 hour ago

    Sally Field is incredible. Hello, My Name is Doris is incredible. See it.

     

    Sarah Pitre @poshdeluxe 1h1 hour ago   Austin, TX

    Just saw my favorite movie of , HELLO, MY NAME IS DORIS. Sally Field is everything. @ Paramount

     

    Alex Lowe @aelowe1 1h1 hour ago

    So many great films at but my gut hurts from laughing at ‘s Hello, My Name is Doris. Review to come.

     

    Eric D. Snider @EricDSnider 1h1 hour ago

    HELLO, MY NAME IS DORIS: national treasure Sally Field plays dotty spinster w/ crush on young co-worker. Funny, maybe kinda shallow?

     

    Allie Hanley @KaBoom_Houston 1h1 hour ago

    Hello, My Name Is Doris (2015) -I want to hug and what an endearing and tremendous performance

     

    Sarah Carlson @sarahkcarlson 60m60 minutes ago

    Standing ovation for Sally Field after screening of “Hello, My Name is Doris.” She’s fab.

     

    Alejandro Diaz @alldiazeverydia 59m59 minutes ago

    Congrats to the cast and crew of Hello, My Name is Doris! Best film I’ve seen at the fest thus far!

     

    Damon Johnson @damonjohnsonvc 56m56 minutes ago

    Huge congrats to for “Hello, My Name Is Doris“. Pretty much a given it would be hilarious… But the editing was perfection too

     

    David Rosen @bydavidrosen 41m41 minutes ago

    Hello My Name Is Doris was SO good. Sally Field ruled. nailed the ending.

     

    John Reineke @johnnyorbit 26m26 minutes ago

    Just saw “Hello, My name is Doris“. It was touching, emotionally tragic but always hilarious.

     

    Ken Robinson @RobinsonKen 17m17 minutes ago

    Wow. Sally Field was fantastic in the film Hello, My name is Doris. Touching, Funny & Smart

     

    K. Conway @KKConway 3m3 minutes ago

    Hello, My Name is Doris was superb, and Sally Field and gave fantastic performances.

     

     

    Ramin Setoodeh @RaminSetoodeh 1h1 hour ago

    Sally Field could get an Oscar nomination for the hilarious, warm and subversive ‘Hello, My Name is Doris.’

     

    Marshall Kistner @mackistner 1h1 hour ago

    Oscar buzz for lead actress Sally Field in Hello My Name Is Doris begins now. Incredible performance, awesome film

     

    Scott Weinberg @scottEweinberg  ·  2h 2 hours ago

    If you love Sally Field, you will like Hello, My Name is Doris. If you don’t love Sally Field, you can fuck off right now.

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    24Emmy
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    #182338

    SXSW Review: Sally Field Delivers a Winning Performance in ‘Hello, My Name is Doris’

     

    By Eric Kohn | Indiewire     March 14, 2015 at 8:57PM

    The actress is at her best in Michael Showalter’s comedy about a 60-year-old single woman pursuing a younger man.

    “Hello, My Name Is Doris”

    If the younger Edith Beale in “Grey Gardens” — the insular middle-aged socialite still living at home with her mother — ventured beyond her insular world and pursued romance with a younger man, she might resemble the adorable, melancholic figure played by Sally Field in “Hello, My Name is Doris.” Directed by “Wet Hot American Summer” co-writer Michael Showalter, who wrote the script with Laura Terruso, the movie follows the titular 60-year-old Staten Island residen in the wake of her mother’s dead as she explores an unlikely courtship with much younger co-worker John (Max Greenfield, “The Mindy Project”). The ensuing bittersweet tale touches on the themes of loneliness and aging that might seem at home in Alexander Payne’s universe, and while Showalter’s broad comedy approach never burrows that deep, Field’s performance is a different story.

    READ MORE: The 2015 Indiewire SXSW Bible

    A world away from her dreary turn as a tortured First Lady in “Lincoln,” Field delivers a highly convincing performance as wide-eyed introvert Doris, who abruptly falls for John after being crammed into an elevator with him, and launches into a series of outrageous fantasies. This leads to several amusing space-out sessions in which Doris imagines handsome John stripping down and throwing himself her way. The reality is more complicated: Spending most of her off-hours with her lively contemporary (Tyne Daly), Doris winds up taking the advice of her friend’s 13-year-old granddaughter and stalks John on the internet, inventing an online persona to learn more about his tastes.

    Before long, she’s pretending to enjoy his favorite rock band and stalking him around town, a feat that culminates with a seemingly innocuous encounter at a local show. While the affable John seems charmed by the older Doris’ apparent eagerness for the scene, Doris takes his enthusiasm as a sign of mutual attraction — a misperception that registers as both endearing and subtly tragic, given the extent to which Doris fails to understand the bigger picture. While not every gag about Doris’ attempt to come across as hip lands well, her overall strategy hits a lovable note.

    As Doris continues to contemplate her prospects with John, her relatives and friends grow increasingly worried about her mental stability. Showalter tracks these developments with fairly straightforward exposition. However, Field imbues the character with a remarkable degree of pathos and crowdpleasing energy, at one point jumping about her home in an awkward shot at practicing her dance moves, then later telling off her friend for discouraging her adventurous spirit. Field’s wrinkled features and petite build enhance the dissonance between Doris’ aspirations and the larger problems that she faces. Coping with hoarding tendencies while shrugging off her relatives’ desire to help her out, she’s a troubled person whose commitment to taking charge of her life is a consistently delightful proposition.

    At the same time, “Hello, My Name is Doris” doesn’t stray from acknowleding Doris’ problems, particularly once her more stable brother (Stephen Root) tries to take charge of her cluttered living situation. When Doris’ ensuing outburst injects a deeply sad monologue into the movie’s otherwise routine comedic atmosphere, it’s as though Field has singlehandedly pierced through the limitations of the material.

    That ability can only do so much for a movie weighed down by several recognizable faces in bit parts (Kumail Nanjiani, Natasha Lyonne) and a somewhat basic trajectory, but Showalter capably guides the movie to an inevitably heartfelt conclusion with the underlying emotional weight of the material intact. Working away in her cubicle with a data entry job she’s held for decades, Doris is initially trapped by her ordinary surroundings — which makes it touching to watch her advance toward escaping them. More than anything else, “Hello, My Name is Doris” effectively conveys the cruel ambivalence of an ageist society, and despite its formulaic ingredients, the movie responds to that setback with Field’s exuberant, virtuoso turn providing the ultimate critical response.

    Grade: B+

    “Hello, My Name is Doris” premiered this weekend at the SXSW Film Festival. It is currently seeking U.S. distribution.

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    24Emmy
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    #182339

    Sally Field Gets Cheers for Rare Leading Role in SXSW Romance

    Michael Buckner/Getty
    March 14, 2015 | 06:23PM PT
    Ramin Setoodeh
    Film Editor, New York   @RaminSetoodeh

    Sally Field took SXSW by storm on Saturday afternoon with “Hello, My Name is Doris,” a dramedy from director Michael Showalter that will certainly be one of the big discoveries out of this year’s festival.

    Field plays the titular character, a 60-something hoarder from Staten Island who develops a crush, which quickly escalates into an obsession, on her much younger co-worker (Max Greenfield). The movie is based on a 2011 short by the script’s co-writer Laura Terruso, called “Doris & the Intern.”

    “Certainly I’ve never read anything as unique as this character,” Field said at an audience Q&A session following the screening, where she received a standing ovation. “You get to a certain point, after being in the business for a long time, you read the same thing over and over again. There’s nothing that blows your skirt off. This blew my skirt way up.”

    Showalter infuses “Hello, My Name is Doris” with the same irreverent sensibility as 2001’s cult favorite “Wet Hot American Summer,” which he co-wrote. Field was struck by how the story played with so many different genres. “We are very dramatic sometimes and then literally off the charts screwball comedy,” Field said. “It’s very hard to mix those together and have it be the same film.”

    It’s also the first time in almost two decades that Field, who’s 68, has anchored a theatrical film. A common lament in Hollywood is how weak the roles for actresses are, but 2015 may be an exception to that rule. There are already almost enough strong performances to pack next year’s Oscars, including Sundance favorites Saoirse Ronan (“Brooklyn”), Blythe Danner (“I’ll See You in My Dreams”) and Lily Tomlin (“Grandma”), with Field now joining their company.

    To get into Doris’ skin, Field turned to a closet of vintage sweaters and skirts. “They were all painful beyond your wildest dreams,” Field said. “Everything itches and hurts.” She tried to protest a neon outfit that Doris wears to a Williamsburg concert, but her director convinced her to don it, and she conceded that he was right when she heard the roaring laughter at the premiere.

    “You guys enjoyed the kissing scenes,” Showalter teased Field and Greenfield.

    “I was embarrassed!” Field said.

    Another fan took to the microphone to scream a message to Field. “I love you! I love you! I love you!” After seeing “Hello, My Name is Doris,” which is seeking U.S. distribution, many movie-goers will be chanting the same.

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    AMG
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    #182340

    I think we potentially have our second Best Actress contender for the Oscars, based on the films seen so far. 

    Sairose Ronan vs Sally Field.  

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    24Emmy
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    #182341

    SXSW: Sally Field on Going Raunchy for ‘Hello, My Name is Doris’ and Why She’s Never Felt Like a Great Success

    By Nigel M Smith | Indiewire     March 16, 2015 at 2:55PM

    “In real life I’m a really raunchy person with a total foul mouth.”

    Daniel Bergeron    Sally Field

    In the two days since “Hello, My Dame is Doris,” the new comedy from “Wet Hot American Summer” co-writer Michael Showalter, premiered at the 2015 SXSW Film Festival, folks in Austin have been talking non-stop about Sally Field’s standout performance in the film.

    The project marks a rare opportunity to see the two-time Oscar winner give her all to a lead role. She recently anchored ABC’s critically acclaimed series “Brother & Sisters” for five years on the small screen, but on the big screen, Field has been relegated to supporting roles over the past decade, stealing scenes as Aunt May in “The Amazing Spider-Man” reboot and its sequel, and earning an Oscar nomination for her bravura performance as Mary Todd Lincoln in Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln.” In “Hello, My Name is Doris,” Field is afforded one of the best and zaniest roles of her career, and it’s a thrill to watch her run with it.

    “If the younger Edith Beale in ‘Grey Gardens’ — the insular middle-aged socialite still living at home with her mother — ventured beyond her insular world and pursued romance with a younger man, she might resemble the adorable, melancholic figure played by Sally Field in ‘Hello, My Name is Doris,'” Eric Kohn wrote in his glowing review of the film. The movie follows Doris, a 60-year-old Staten Island resident, in the wake of her mother’s death as she explores an unlikely courtship with much younger co-worker John (Max Greenfield of “New Girl”).

    Indiewire sat down with Field the day following the film’s world premiere in Austin to discuss how she shaped her performance, and the need for change in Hollywood and elsewhere when it comes to women’s rights.


    SXSW  “Hello, My Name is Doris”

    You said yesterday at the premiere that this film blew your skirt “way up.” Clearly this role was a godsend to you given the depth of the character and the quality of the project.

    Well, it’s just so unique. You read a lot of scripts and it’s just kind of the same old thing – nothing to do. I often say, “You don’t really need me.” It’s boring. When this came, it’s so weird, it’s such a weird story. [laughs] I kept saying to Michael, how are you going to make this work? I was always skeptical.

    I threw myself in it with a sense of finding a place of reality for her. It all made sense to her in her borderline personality way. But to me, the difficulty that Michael had was in putting this kind of film together. The tone of a screwball comedy, which it really is, is very physical, high comedy right next to very dramatic work. It’s hard to make those two blend together in the same film. He always said, “Trust me.” I just did and knew that my task was to root even the most outlandish physical comedy in just being real.

    So much of who Doris is, is dictated by her outlandish style. How much freedom did you have in creating her unique look?

    It was totally me. Michael said, “Go,” and did. I came up with the whole hairdo. I went looking of course on the Internet and I imitated a Brigitte Bardot hairdo, with the big ribbon in it. She did that; she had bangs and the whole thing. As far as Doris is concerned, she thinks she looks like that. She doesn’t think she looks like Bardot, but she thinks she looks just dandy. She paints her eyes on like that. She just picks looks she likes out of the magazines that she halfway finishes, and she gets her clothes from the trash and thrift shops, and she puts them together because she likes the colors. Since she’s so out of society all together, she just makes up her own fashion rules. Puts it all on at the same time and says, “I like this.” [laughs]

    Did you like it?

    No, I hated it! [Laughs] I knew it was the character. How she paints her nails all different colors. She has an artful sense about herself. She doesn’t have an inner mirror because she was always isolated.

    How did Michael react to your vision of Doris?

    Rebecca Gregg, our costume designer, she is a diamond of human being. She herself is a bit strange and it was just perfect! Except not Doris strange — just her own unique strange. We spent two days together, one full day from the crack of dawn till I couldn’t stand up any longer. She got racks and racks of clothing out of Hollywood lots – anyplace that would actually store clothes ’cause they don’t do it very much anymore. It cost next to nothing when you rent those clothes but they reek… eek! It was a task she had to pull off ’cause this movie was made for no money. 

    We just played dress up for a day, and it’s really how I started to find Doris. Of course we laughed ourselves sick half of the time. We just slowly found the character and had Michael come in on day three, and he just went, “Oh my god yes.” He never saw the hair or makeup until the day we started to shoot. I had cut out pictures of Brigitte Bardot, eyes, things I thought it should be. It was written in the script that she had her own unique style, but it didn’t say what.

    We knew the fact that she was a hoarder; she was like a hoarder on herself. Everything she owned, she would just put on.

    Do you always work this way, or did this project call for a different approach of really finding the character through the outer layers?

    Finding a character, the exterior is incredibly important. It goes hand in hand with developing the interior.  I do work that way when I get the opportunity. Sometimes you get a role that doesn’t call for much work at all. You feel like you could just show up. After 50 somewhat years of doing it, it’s not much fun as you think.

    I can’t recall the last time you had a lead role this juicy on the big screen. Can you?

    “I just never have felt I was a great success.” Sally Field

    I don’t know! I did a television show for five years, which really took me out of that marketplace. I was so exhausted I thought I was going to die after every season. But it is true, with all of us. Young or old, but most especially as you get older.

    Female actors —

    Yeah, female — not male! Not male, young or old, they keep working. It just has to do with the industry, as you know. I’m hoping that this younger generation of female actors is becoming more vocal about it. I do know that the issues having to do with women on a world level are starting to be heard more loudly – thank god. It’s something that I’ve been a part of – not in Hollywood but on a world level. It’s time. The world won’t heal until women can come to the proverbial table in an equal way because we’re out of balance. There are a lot of inequalities going on in the world that I’m happy to say this country is dealing with. Gay rights, it has to be dealt with. This is ridiculous. We need the wealth of talent and ingenious people that happen to be gay. We need them as our partners in the human race to have children, to raise them to be happy productive people. But we need that for women and we need it now on a world level.

    What did you make of Patricia Arquette’s rousing Oscar acceptance speech?

    Everyone who watched it stood up and cheered. But it’s finally being heard. People have been saying that, just now it’s going, “Oh… oh!”



    Dreamworks“Lincoln”

    During your awards campaign for “Lincoln,” you were so open about the fact that you had to fight hard for the role — a fact that no doubt shocked many, myself included. What caused you to be so open about that process?

    I would talk about the “Lincoln” thing because it was just part of the story of making the film. Just because I won awards or have been working for 50 years doesn’t mean that I should just get the role of Mary Todd – not in anyway, shape or form. I can’t stand the feeling of entitlement, not ever. I know people like Daniel [Day-Lewis] for example. He doesn’t have a feeling of entitlement, nor should anyone. No matter how anointed you might be, or how successful you might be in any area that you’re working in – anytime you sit back and go “I’ve arrived,” you’re dead – because you’re going to get struck from behind by your own arrogance. You won’t be able to move on.

    When did you come to that realization? You have the right to have an inflated sense of ego. From a very young age, you were met with great success and acclaim.

    Well, I don’t know. I just never have felt I was a great success.

    That’s crazy.

    I know… it’s crazy! But it’s true. It’s the thing that keeps me driving myself forward. I grew up in a show business family, working class – that probably has something to do with it. It’s not an easy business to survive in. 

    The scene from “Doris” we have to broach is the one where you have Max Greenfield pump up your yoga ball at your desk [watch it above]. I’m not going to lie… I got a little turned on watching it. It’s a sex scene, without the sex.

    [Laughs] It is! It’s so wild. But in real life I’m a really raunchy person with a total foul mouth. Maybe I do that so people don’t feel intimated or shy [around me]. I don’t even know what they would feel that way. So I beat them to the punch. Max is such a gem of a soul. Working with him is so easy and fun. I just had to dive in. There’s a part of me that feels slightly embarrassed – I’m in my late 60s and he’s in his early 30s. So I kind of had to just sort of dive in and there and say, “Okay whatever, it’s just skin!”

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    awardsdontmatter
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    #182342

    wait. how is Meryl not starring in this?? first “Wild Oats” goes to Lange and MacLaine, now Field scores this? what is happening with the world???

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    TomHardys
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    #182343

    wait. how is Meryl not starring in this?? first “Wild Oats” goes to Lange and MacLaine, not Field scores this? what is happening with the world???

    The world is finally realizing there are more incredibly talented 60+ years old actresses other than just Meryl Streep.

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    SupaDupa Fly
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    #182344

    wait. how is Meryl not starring in this?? first “Wild Oats” goes to Lange and MacLaine, now Field scores this? what is happening with the world???

     

    It’s about time other amazing actresses were recognized.

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