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Horror Cinema at the Oscars

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  • Andrew Carden
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    #1201930960

    As a film buff who was raised on horror – and whose parents somehow had no qualms about renting R-rated slasher films for him as a young lad (in addition to milder mainstays like Attack of the Killer Tomatoes and Killer Klowns from Outer Space) – I have long been enamored with this genre.

    My father got me into the classics – the Universal monster movies and Hammer horror flicks (which, let it be known, also sported some of the most drop-dead gorgeous women to ever grace the big screen) – while my mom was all about the ’70s horror, plus Freddy Krueger, Chucky, Leprechaun and so on.

    The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences of course did not opt to recognize any of the films of those horror franchise legends. Looking back, however, there are a number of surprises and eyebrow-raisers in terms of what horror pictures the Academy did nominate.

    Awards buffs like us know the critically acclaimed likes of The Exorcist and Jaws were embraced but less known are some of the super-obscure horror flicks that were recognized. For instance, while the Academy ignored The Invisible Man, they gave tech nods to two spin-offs – The Invisible Man Returns and The Invisible Woman.

    Horror pictures like Psycho, What Ever Happened to Baby Jane, Rosemary’s Baby and Aliens were modestly embraced, while the likes of The Haunting, Halloween and The Shining received nada. Then, of course, you have greats like Fredric March, Ruth Gordon, Kathy Bates, Anthony Hopkins and Jodie Foster (arguably Natalie Portman too) who were able to transcend the genre to score acting victories.

    Over at my blog this month – just in time for Halloween – I’m looking back at every single horror film nominated for an Oscar, including the well-known, Oscar-winning contenders, the nominated short subjects of the genre and the real duds that made it into Oscar night with a single nomination. I’m also discussing the horror films that struck out with the Academy, despite precursor attention, and the unimpeachable classics that failed to make any awards dent at all.

    This morning, I posted my first entry, on the first three decades of horror at the Oscars.

    What are your favorite horror films and performances recognized by the Oscars? And what/who do you consider most egregiously snubbed by the Academy in this genre?

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    KyleBailey
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    Nov 15th, 2013
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    #1201931022

    I think they rewarded the two greatest horror/thrillers of all time, Silence of the Lambs and Misery. They also snubbed the greats like Psycho and Nightmare on Elm Street though. Would have also loved a nom for John Carpenter for Halloween. Not amazing but definitely amazing direction on his part

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    babypook
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    Nov 4th, 2010
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    #1201931032

    So many greats; hard to begin somewhere. I’m a fan of the comedic to the super-serious horror films out there.

    I’ll mention Robert Eggers, a rather ‘egg-headed’ director thus far. I’d love to see how his resume expands.
    So far, he’s one scary dude.

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    Andrew Carden
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    #1201931042

    I wasn’t quite head-over-heels for The Witch but I would concede Eggers is undoubtedly a gifted and immensely promising filmmaker.

    OSCAR FLASHBACK: HORROR at the Oscars! Chapter I (1928-1959)

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    Alex Meyer
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    #1201931057

    The Witch is my favorite film of the year so far, which says a lot for me because horror is one of my least favorite genres.

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    Jacob Skinner
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    #1201931059

    The Bride of Frankenstein was nominated for an Oscar, for Sound. It wasn’t much, but it was still more than a whole slew of other worthy genre pictures received during that era.

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    Anonymous
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    Jan 1st, 1970
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    #1201931079

    I don’t know about you, but Vera Farmiga kicks ass in every Conjuring movie.

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    Sab227
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    Dec 29th, 2012
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    #1201931228

    I don’t know about you, but Vera Farmiga kicks ass in every Conjuring movie.

    I completely agree she was oscar worthy in both films

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    Andrew Carden
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    #1201931333

    Jacob, thank you for the correction on Bride of Frankenstein! For some reason, I’d always been under the impression it was shut out entirely.

    OSCAR FLASHBACK: HORROR at the Oscars! Chapter I (1928-1959)

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    Andrew Carden
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    #1201933794

    NEW POST is now up, looking at how horror fared at the Oscars from 1960 to 1979…

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