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If Glenda Jackson was never born……….

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  • RobertPius
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    #1202402897

    How would it affect Oscar history? (nothing against the woman but her two wins always stick out as an Oscar oddity.)

    I’m guessing Carrie Snodgress would have won in 1970.

    1973 is confusing. Such an odd year. Almost anyone could have won. I’m guessing Burstyn would have taken it. (Streisand was already getting flack for being “difficult”, Woodward had angered people when Paul Newman didn’t get nominated for directing “Rachel, Rachel” and she spoke out against the academy and Neil Simon said in his bio that Marsha Mason didn’t expect to win. They thought Burstyn or Streisand would win because those were the bigger money making films.)

    So if Burstyn won in 73 then she wouldn’t have won in 74. Faye Dunaway says in her bio that the Chinatown team thought they stood a chance at winning stuff so she could have got it (or Gena Rowlands? or was that film too offbeat for the Academy.)

    So if Dunaway took 74 then Liv Ullman gets 76? (Dunaway says in her book that Ullman was considered the person who might beat her) or could Spacek have taken it and then Mary Tyler Moore could have won in 1980? Domino effect!!

    Just musing!!!

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    keithw
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    #1202403103

    I think Ali MacGraw likely came in second for “Love Story” in 1970. If Glenda Jackson didn’t win for “A Touch of Class”, then I think Stresiand likely would have. When Ellen Burstyn won for “Alice”, I think Gena Rowlands was the runner-up for “A Woman Under the Influence”.

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    BenitoDelicias
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    #1202403175

    There’s still a possibility that some of those women could have repeated. Specially Dunaway. We’re talking about Glenda Jackson who won in 70 and 73, so why not Dunaway?

    I agree that Snodgress wins in 1970.

    Burstyn wins in 1973. Although if she was as strong, she would’ve won over Jackson. So who knows. Who would’ve been the 5th nominee? Weird year.

    1974 either Dunaway wins or Gena Rowlands. I think in this case they have very clear options.

    1976 Dunaway repeats if she would’ve won in 1974. She had strong performances and very strong films to back her up. Both could’ve won Picture and Director and history would be fine, specially in 76.

    1980 Spaceck still wins. She wouldn’t have lost with this role had she won in 1976, which wouldn’t have happened with that film anyway.

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    OnTheAisle
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    #1202403204

    The more intriguing question is who would director Ken Russell have cast in Women in Love as Gudrun Brangwen. Vanessa Redgrave, a leading British actress who would soon appear in The Devils seems a reasonable choice. The part is strong and Redgrave is a skilled actress. She probably would have won.

    I don’t see Melvin Frank casting Vanessa Redgrave in A Touch of Class. The part requires an Englishwoman. Either Sarah Miles or Maggie Smith were box office draws then. The film would still be a Best Picture nominee. Maggie Smith would easily have won again. Sarah Miles probably would not.

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    Andrew Carden
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    #1202403216

    Sans Jackson, I suspect MacGraw (UGH) prevails in ’70 and Streisand takes it in ’73. Had Burstyn won, Rowlands wins in ’74. Had Burstyn won and then Dunaway triumphed, I think Dunaway actually repeats in ’76. Had Spacek somehow won in ’76, I suspect she still repeats in ’80.

    For the finest in film reviews and awards analysis, please visit me at The Awards Connection!

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    Atypical
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    #1202403483

    Much of this depends on if the sixth-place finisher could amass enough support to either knock off a new winner or siphon off votes from someone else. I also think McGraw would have been a populist choice if Jackson wasn’t around. I adore “Women in Love” as one of the most bizarre lead actress wins ever, so I think Jackson’s 1st Oscar win was completely earned. I haven’t seen “A Touch of Class” to know how earned that was or what the competition was like for Jackson.

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    keithw
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    #1202403534

    I agree about MacGraw being runner-up to Jackson’s first win. “Love Story” was a huge hit and was nominated for several Oscars including Best Picture. Alexander didn’t have that much screen time and I don’t think Snodgress (the only nomination for her movie I believe) or Miles had much of a chance. Jackson’s second Oscar was won in what I consider the best Best Actress line up ever. Each of the 5 was a truly deserving winner……Jackson just happened to get the most votes in what would be once of the closest five way races ever I think!

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    Macca
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    #1202403545

    Here’s what I think it would have looked like if there was no Jackson.

    1970

    Jane Alexander (The Great White Hope)
    Ali MacGraw (Love Story)
    Sarah Miles (Ryan’s Daughter)
    Carrie Snodgrass (Diary of a Mad Housewife)
    Barbra Streisand (The Owl and the Pussycat)

    1973

    Ellen Burstyn (The Exorcist)
    Julie Christie (Don’t Look Now)
    Marsha Mason (Cinderella Liberty)
    Barbra Streisand (The Way We Were)
    Joanne Woodward (Summer Wishes, Winter Dreams)

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    Eddy Q
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    #1202403587

    The more intriguing question is who would director Ken Russell have cast in Women in Love as Gudrun Brangwen. Vanessa Redgrave, a leading British actress who would soon appear in The Devils seems a reasonable choice. The part is strong and Redgrave is a skilled actress. She probably would have won.

    Apparently Redgrave was offered the part of Ursula. She turned it down because she found the role less interesting than Gudrun. But it would’ve been fascinating to have a film with both Jackson and Redgrave in it that has a higher critical reputation than Mary, Queen of Scots.

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    Eddy Q
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    #1202403589

    1973

    Ellen Burstyn (The Exorcist)
    Julie Christie (Don’t Look Now)
    Marsha Mason (Cinderella Liberty)
    Barbra Streisand (The Way We Were)
    Joanne Woodward (Summer Wishes, Winter Dreams)

    I don’t think Don’t Look Now was on the Academy’s radar at all, otherwise it would’ve at least got cinematography and editing nominations.

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    Andrew Carden
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    #1202403703

    Paramount largely botched the U.S. release of Don’t Look Now and didn’t bother with much of an awards season campaign at all.

    If you take Jackson out of the equation, I suspect these are her replacements…

    ’70: Melina Mercouri, Promise at Dawn
    ’71: Ruth Gordon, Harold and Maude
    ’73: Katharine Hepburn, A Delicate Balance
    ’75: Karen Black, The Day of the Locust

    For the finest in film reviews and awards analysis, please visit me at The Awards Connection!

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    RobertPius
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    #1202403974

    Barbra Streisand in The Owl and the Pussycat and Ruth Gordon in Harold and Maude are such good suggestions. Those were two great performances. Streisand is downright hilarious in that film.

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    Macca
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    #1202404017

    I would have said that her replacement in ’71 was Irene Papas for The Trojan Women and Julie Christie for Shampoo in ’75.

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    MultipleOscarWinner
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    #1202406247

    The domino effect on this one is strong. I wonder what would’ve happened if John Wayne wouldn’t have been born (besides this being a better world without him).

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    keithw
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    #1202406841

    I think Richard Burton would have an Oscar for “Anne of the Thousand Days” if John Wayne had never been born.

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