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If You Were a Film Studies Teacher, What Films Would You Screen As Part of your Curriculum?

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  • Anonymous
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    #89770

    As far as a limit, I’d say around 10-11 films or so for 1 semester? Seems about right..

    You are a teacher and of course you want to discuss the finest auteurs as well as cover all genres and eras, what films would you decide on your class?

    1. City Lights- I’d want to discuss silent films, and one of the most famous silent stars in one of his most acclaimed films
    2. Citizen Kane- regarded as the greatest movie ever made
    3. Singin’ in the Rain- a talkie, a musical, colorful excitement
    4. 2001: A Space Odyssey- Kubrick, science fiction, technology
    5. Persona- a foreign film, Bergman
    6. Blair Witch Project- horror film, the begining of a new trend in low budget filmmaking
    7. Annie Hall- comedy, Woody Allen
    8. Double Indeminity- Billy Wilder, noir
    9. Jaws- summer blockbuster
    10. The Searchers- western, the treatment of other races in films
    11. The Social Network- modern cinema, digital photography, new age of technology 

    SHORT FILMS:
    A Trip to the Moon
    Un Chien Andalou
    Pixar short films
                  

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    Marcus Snowden (The Artist Formerly Known as msnowden1)
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    #89772

    I would probably show Birth of a Nation for an epic silent film. Then, I would Metropolis. After that we would go into the ’30s with It Happened One Night. For the ’40s, I would show the greatest film ever made, Citizen Kane. For the ’50s, its easily Sunset Boulevard. For the ’60s, it’s one of the best musicals of all time, West Side Story. For the ’70s, it’s The Godfather. For the ’80s, its Raging Bull. For the ’90s, its Schindler’s List. For the ’00s, its between The Dark Knight and There Will Be Blood. Finally, for the ’10s, it would be The Social Network.

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    BrokenFan
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    #89773

    Films that I would include are those that brought an interest in films and some of my favorite films because it’s my damn class and I’ll show whatever the hell I want :

    Metropolis
    The 400 Blows
    The Bicycle Thieves
    That one Godard film (Breathless? idk it was a long time ago)
    The Gold Rush 
    Vertigo
    North by Northwest
    Misery
    Taxi Driver 
    Casablanca 
    Dr. Strangelove
    A Clockwork Orange
    About Schmidt
    The Godfather
    Taxi Driver 
    The Exorcist
    The Deer Hunter (Yup.)
    Apocalypse Now
    Raging Bull
    Kramer vs. Kramer
    Indiana Jones especially Raiders(Yup.) 
    Silence of the Lambs
    Boogie Nights
    Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
    Fight Club/American Beauty
    Dancer in the Dark
    Pulp Fiction
    The Sixth Sense
    Magnolia
    The Social Network
    The Dark Knight
    Old Boy
    Mulholland Drive
    Star Trek/District 9
    Wall-E/Ratatouiile/Toy Story 3
    Little Miss Sunshine
    Zodiac
    There Will Be Blood/No Country for Old Men/Michael Clayton
    Slumdog
    Inglorious Basterds
    The Fighter
    Inception
    Melancholia 
    Black Swan
    Up in the Air

     

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    Logan
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    #89774

    I have a 1930-59 class, covering:

    M

    It Happened One Night

    Port of Shadows

    Stagecoach

    Citizen Kane

    Double Indemnity

    Naked City

    Rome, Open City

    Bicycle Thieves

    La Pointe Courte

    Rear Window

    Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

    Breathless

    Hiroshima Mon Amour

    Seven Samurai

    Rebel Without a Cause

    Imitation of Life
      

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    Gabriel
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    #89775

    Definitely Taxi Driver. There is so much to be said about that film.

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    Troy
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    #89776

    The Wizard of Oz
    Citizen Kane
    Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
    Psycho
    Network
    Halloween
    Cabaret
    Raging Bull
    The Silence of the Lambs
    The Crying Game
    Fargo
    Chicago

     

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    Marcus Snowden (The Artist Formerly Known as msnowden1)
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    #89777

    I totally forgot about all of those other movies. If teachers can show foreign films in their class, it would be either Seven Samurai or Z.

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    Pieman1994
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    #89778

    I’ve actually done this with my film production/studies teachers/professors. It’s pretty expensive, but here’s a watered down version…

    The Godfather (it’s a classic, and widely considered the greatest film of all time)
    Rear Window (the most accessible Hitchcock film)
    Dr. Strangelove (the perfect example of black comedy, and Kubrick’s finest)
    City of God (an ensemble film, a foreign film, a gritty drama, excellent use of non-linear storytelling, stylistically arresting)
    Halloween (hallmark in slasher films, and a critical turning point in horror film)
    The Artist (there are better silent films, but it’s good enough, and accessible enough for the purposes of this course)
    Casablanca (a perfect example of classic Hollywood and American cinema)
    The Dark Knight (this is the film of a generation, for better or for worse)
    Being John Malkovich (extentialist, meta-reality, hilarity, and one of the most bizarre experiments in film)
    Taxi Driver (the best Scorsese film, and an excellent character study of a mentally insane anti-hero)
    The Social Network (a biopic about one of the most important innovations of the last decade, a story beyond the subject matter, and a David Fincher classic)
    Pulp Fiction (the most important film of the nineties, and arguably the most original piece of storytelling in film)
    The Prestige (this is the first film we watched as understanding style and storytelling in my New Media class, and it remains one of the most underrated movies of the last ten years) 

     

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    babypook
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    #89779

    I’d add The Potemkin (1925) and Sunrise (1927). I’d also add films by James Whale, Nosferatu (1922) , Charlie Chaplin and Fritz Lang. Plus, Kurosawa, especially if I’m giving this class.

    I like all of the mentions above too. 

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    Riley
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    #89780

    I am just finishing up a university film class (History of Cinema Part
    II: 1930s to the Present) now and these are the films that we screened
    over the last twelve weeks and the names of the units:

    1. The Artist (The Emergence of Sound )
    2. The Searchers (The Cinema of Remembrance)
    3. Citizen Kane (Genius and the Fractured Image )
    4. It’s a Wonderful Life (Cinema of Conscience)
    5. I Confess (The Banality of Evil)
    6. Ballad of a Soldier (The Russian Soul in Cinema)
    7. The Bicycle Thief (Italian Neorealism and the French New Wave)
    8. Au hazard Balthazar (Trends in European Cinema)
    9. Seven Samurai (Trends in Asian Cinema)
    10. Chinatown (Hollywood Renaissance and the American Auteur)
    11. Empire of the Sun (Return of the Myths)
    12. The Tree of Life (Modern Philosopher-Poets)

     

    We also screened many short clips from other films.  Of the six Hitchcock films that I have seen, I Confess is easily the worst.  I am not sure how influential Ballad of a Soldier is.  Empire of the Sun
    is apparently my professor’s favourite Spielberg film, but it is not
    that well-regarded (60 on Metacritic) and it did not really relate to
    our unit at the time.  And personally, I found Seven Samurai awful and wish that we had gone for Tokyo Story.  Thoughts?

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    delerian
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    #89781

    I’m assuming this a film studies program in a high school. At the university level you would need several courses discussing history, theory, and analysis just for a minor, most of them specialized. A good example on how to start an introductory program might be to look at the syllabus and readings for the MIT OpenCourseWare film studies class.

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    All-Seeing Eye
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    #89782

    Having taken a film art class, I must say that this list reflect both my personal favorites and films that I acknowledge have artistic or filmic qualities worthy of analyzing. 

    Citizen Kane (Obviously)
    All About Eve (Classical Hollywood Style)
    On the Waterfront (Heightened realism, cinematography, and awesomeness)
    Bicycle Thieves (Foreign fim a part of influential Italian neo-realism movement)
    Rosemary’s Baby (Introduction to horror genre)
    Who’s Afraid of Virgina Woolf? (Ideology and the American Dream)
    The Conversation (Example of cinematic potential of sound)
    The French Connection (Excellent editing)
    Network (New Hollywood and amazing screenplay)
    Annie Hall (American Auteur and the romatic comedy)
    Pulp Fiction (Unconvential narrative structure)
    The Social Network (Modern cinema)

    P.S. Making an interesting list of films while trying to teach students at the same time is hard lol

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