In your opinion, who should have the most Oscar wins for Acting?

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  • Laactingnyc
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    #104191

    Who do you think should have the most Oscar wins and for what film?

    In my opinion Bette Davis should have the most by now with 6 Oscars.

    1934 – Of Human Bondage
    1938 – Jezebel
    1940 – The Letter
    1942 – Now, Voyager
    1950 – All About Eve
    1962 – Whatever happened to Baby Jane?

    Discuss.

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    Beau S.
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    #104193

    Bette Davis with five.

    1934 – Of Human Bondage (frankly, I think Silence of the Lambs is the only film that should have the big 5 Oscars)
    1938 – Jezebel
    1942 – Now, Voyager (Garson had many better performances)
    1950 – All About Eve (Holliday doesn’t need one)
    1962 – What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (Anne Bancroft wins for The Graduate)

    Meryl Streep and Jack Nicholson in second with four. Streep for Kramer vs. Kramer, Sophie’s Choice, A Cry in the Dark and The Iron Lady. Nicholson for The Last Detail, Terms of Endearment, As Good As it Gets and About Schmidt (though Brody is a great winner).

    Since she currently holds the actual record…Katharine Hepburn with 3 (Morning Glory, Alice Adams, The Lion in Winter).

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    Halo_Insider
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    #104194

    What do you guys think about Gene Hackman? I’ve only seen parts of I Never Sang for My Father, but I’m tempted to give him at least 3 Oscars for Bonnie and Clyde, Unforgiven, and The French Connection (though he earns some tough competion from Jaye Davidson and Malcolm McDowell for the latter contests).

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    allabout oscars
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    #104195

    For the men…

    DUSTIN HOFFMAN

    1967 THE GRADUATE
    1969 MIDNIGHT COWBOY
    1970 LITTLE BIG MAN
    1979 KRAMER VS KRAMER
    1982 TOOTSIE

    For the women

    MERYL STREEP

    1979 KRAMER VS KRAMER
    1982 SOPHIE’S CHOICE
    1988 A CRY IN THE DARK
    1995 THE BRIDGES OF MADISON COUNTY
    2009 JULIE AND JULIA
    2011 THE IRON LADY

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    Miss Frost
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    #104196

    Anne Bancroft should have three Best Actress wins: The Miracle Worker (Won), The Pumpkin Eater, and The Graduate.

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    tonorlo
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    #104197

    In a perfect world, Charlie Chaplin would have won for Best Actor 1931 (“City Lights), Best Actor 1940 (“The Great Dictator), Best Actor 1947 (“Monsieur Verdoux”) and (if we’re going by the year of Academy eligibility) Best Actor 1972 (“Limelight”)… yes, over Brando.

    Had the Academy been instituted years earlier, I could have conceivably voted Oscars to Lon Chaney for “The Hunchback of Notre Dame,” (Best Actor 1923) “The Unknown” (Best Actor 1927) and “Laugh, Clown, Laugh” (Best Actor 1928).

    Among the folks who racked up multiple nominations/wins over the years… Despite being a HUGE Barbara Stanwyck fan, I wholeheartedly support Ingrid Bergman’s 1944 Oscar win for Best Actress, and frankly of the actual nominees from 1945, I usually peg her as my winner of that year for “The Bells of St. Mary’s.” I can live with her wins for “Anastasia” and “Murder on the Orient Express” although I preferred others in those respective years, but I badly wish she had won in 1978 for “Autumn Sonata,” by far the worthiest of her nominated performances.

    For Katharine Hepburn, I would have had her win for “Alice Adams,” “Long Day’s Journey Into Night” and I fully support the win for “The Lion in Winter.” I’m also one of the few who supports her win for “On Golden Pond,” though that is admittedly more of a heart than a head call.

    Bette Davis is tough. The only one of her Oscar nominations that I think deserved to turn into a win was “Now, Voyager.” (And that’s really painful, because I love Greer Garson. If Garson had been nominated for “Random Harvest,” I think I’d have to call a tie.) I’ve always had slight reservations with crowning Davis as the victor in 1950 because I’m in the extreme minority that considers “All About Eve” an ensemble piece rather than a Davis vehicle, and she’s never had the impact on me in the film that she seems to have on the rest of the world. But I do applaud her for her ability to find the gradations and nuances that make Margo Channing’s erratic mood swings feel germane to the same person, a quality that I’ve always found lacking in Gloria Swanson’s Norma Desmond (to me, Swanson flips a switch from Imperious to Vulnerable to Off-The-Deep-End in a 100-Emotions-in-Search-of-a-Character sort of way, although I find the approach more laudable with Swanson’s work in “Sunset Blvd.” than I typically do when other actors use this approach). And for YEARS, I actually thought that Baxter was superior to Davis in “Eve”; I’ve really only “seen the light” within the past decade of re-watching the film. Nutso, right? Wrapping up on Davis, however: I actually think that one of her very best (and criminally underrated) turns came in 1945’s “The Corn is Green.” Had Davis been nominated for this performance, I could have gladly voted her the Oscar without a second thought.

    Coming back to Stanwyck, somebody who should have been far more represented by the Oscar ballots than she was over the years… Nobody could touch her in the 1930s for the insouciance and sheer cajones she brought to the table (not even Davis), and she surely deserved recognition for “The Miracle Worker,” “The Bitter Tea of General Yen” and “Baby Face” among her non-nominated work. Two of her nominated turns present a serious conundrum for me. Depending on my mood that day, I can cede her the 1937 win for “Stella Dallas,” and five minutes later Garbo in “Camille” and even the much-maligned Rainer in “The Good Earth” look good to me. For the longest time, I had an admitted ambivalence to awarding her superb work in “Ball of Fire” because (a) all the women against her that year are heaving and hawing their way through heavy dramas and (b) all of her co-nominees appear to be working much harder than Stanwyck is, which, when it boils down to it, makes her achievement all the more laudable. But the more I re-evaluate the 1941 race, Stanwyck more often than not is the one who comes out smelling like a rose, while the other ladies feel like faded violets. But even awarding Stanwyck for “Ball of Fire” in 1941 comes with an uneasy wince, because she delivered a truly worthy, for-the-ages tour-de-force in “The Lady Eve” which SHOULD have been her nominated vehicle. So, among women, I frankly would have given Stanwyck a three-year consecutive punch for “Miracle Worker,” “Bitter Tea” and “Baby Face” and a fourth win for “The Lady Eve.” (Very, very painful to admit, but I always felt that Stanwyck in “Sorry, Wrong Number” was the weakest link in the otherwise sterling 1948 lineup.)

      

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    Laactingnyc
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    #104198

    Although Bette Davis is my choice i also think that the following should have won more than they got

    Ingrid Bergman

    Gaslight
    Anastasia
    Murder on the Orient Express
    Autumn Sonata

    Olivia De Havilland

    Gone with the Wind
    To Each His Own
    The Snake Pit
    The Heiress

    Meryl Streep

    Kramer vs Kramer
    Sophies Choice
    A Cry in the Dark
    Bridges of Madison County
    The Iron Lady

    and maybe Doubt…. maybe that year was hard to pick 1.

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    Baby Clyde
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    #104199

    For the women

    MERYL STREEP

    1979 KRAMER VS KRAMER
    1982 SOPHIE’S CHOICE
    1988 A CRY IN THE DARK
    1995 THE BRIDGES OF MADISON COUNTY
    2009 JULIE AND JULIA
    2011 THE IRON LADY

    I hate to agree because it seems so obvious, but this is exactly my answer too.

    I should say that there are couple of wins there that she gets by default because either the competition was so weak or the best performances weren’t nommed.

    Katharine Hepburn runs her close though I’d give her 5 as well with another potential win still to be decided. I’d take away 2 of her wins but give her 3 more

    1933 – May Robson for Lady For A Day (Instead of Katherine Hepburn for Morning Glory)
    1935 – Katharine Hepburn for Alice Adams (Instead of Bette Davis for Dangerous) Possibly the worst Best Actress win ever.
    1955 – Katharine Hepburn for Summertime (Instead of Anna Magnani for The Rose Tattoo) One of the best screen performances of all time.
    1956 – Katharine Hepburn for The Rainmaker (Instead of Ingrid Bergman for Anastasia) Not a vintage year. Should maybe see Baby Doll again and haven’t seen The Rainmaker in 20 years but my notes from then give her the win.
    1967 – Edith Evans for The Whisperers (Instead of Katherine Hepburn for Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner). Best line up EVER!!!
    1968 – Tie: Katharine Hepburn for The Lion In Winter and Barbra Streisand for Funny Girl. If The Academy can do it then so can I.
    1981 – Katherine Hepburn for On Golden Pond.

    The one left undecided is 1962 because I haven’t see ‘Long Days Journey Into Night’. I do own it and will try and watch this weekend (I’ve been saying that for 3 years now). At the moment I have Bette winning and I’d quite like it to stay that way.

    Bette would have 4 from me. I’d take away her first but give her 3 more.

    1935 – Katharine Hepburn for Alice Adams (Instead of Bette Davis for Dangerous)
    1938 – Bette Davis for Jezebel
    1940 – Bette Davis for The Letter (Instead of Ginger Rogers for Kitty Foyle) One of the strangest wins ever
    1942 – Bette Davis for Now Voyager (Instead of Greer Garson for Mrs Miniver)
    1962 – Bette Davis for Whatever Happened To Baby Jane (Instead of Anne Bancroft for The Miracle Worker) For now.

    Special mentiosn should also go to 1941 when I have Bette and Barbara neck and neck. Also 1950 obvs where Gloria just about beats her.

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    Scottferguson
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    #104200

    Going not by nominations (a ridiculous way to rank acting achievement) but overall performances, I’d say Cary Grant, James Stewart, James Cagney, Bette Davis and Katharine Hepburn (not specifically attaching years and competition to them) would deserve the most Oscars based on the number of great performances each gave. John Wayne, Humphrey Bogart, Deborah Kerr would be close.

    The closest any contemporary actor comes for me would be Gene Hackman.

    Meryl Streep has given some good performances, but I’d be pushing it to suggest she has given at most more than two that are Oscar worthy (I’d say Cry in the Dark and The Seduction of Joe Tynan). She wouldn’t make my list of the top 50 most deserving.

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    Baby Clyde
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    #104201

    I agree that nominations are in no way an indicator who is most deserving, but opening it up to anybody the process far too complicated.

    I’m happy to rank by the choices the Academy gave us.

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    babypook
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    #104202

    Heck I dunno. I do agree with most above. I’ll give props to Chris Walken though.

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    babypook
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    #104203

    What do you guys think about Gene Hackman? I’ve only seen parts of I Never Sang for My Father, but I’m tempted to give him at least 3 Oscars for Bonnie and Clyde, Unforgiven, and The French Connection (though he earns some tough competion from Jaye Davidson and Malcolm McDowell for the latter contests).

    Gene Hackman is an acting GAWD imo. Nice mention. The guy can play almost anyone, and in any genre. Love his skill and persona.  

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    Miss Frost
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    #104204

    Anne Bancroft: The Miracle Worker (Won), The Pumpkin Eater, The Graduate

      Meryl Streep: Kramer vs Kramer (Won), Sophie’s Choice (Won), Cry In the Dark, and The Iron Lady (Won).

    Katharine Hepburn: Alice Adams, The Philadelphia Story, and Lion in the Winter (Won).

    Bette Davis: Jezebel (Won), Now, Voyager, All About Eve.

    Maggie Smith: The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (Won), California Suite (Won), The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne, and Gosford Park.

    Judi Dench: Mrs. Brown, Mrs. Henderson Presents, Notes On a Scandal   

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    Anonymous
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    #104205

    For just wins: Just of recently, I’d say Amy Adams should have 3 wins.

    Robert DeNiro:
    The Godfather Part 2
    Taxi Driver
    The Deer Hunter
    Raging Bull
    The King of Comedy

    Jack Nicholson:(but tons of noms)
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
    Terms of Endearment
    About Schmidt

    Al Pacino:
    The Godfather
    The Godfather Part 2
    Glengarry Glen Ross

     

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    Beau S.
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    #104206

    I never quite understood the love for Nicholson in Cuckoo’s Nest. The film is brilliant (as is Louise Fletcher) and totally deserved Best Picture, but I found him to be quite annoying and he brought nothing special to it (i.e. I could picture a few actors in that role).
    His win makes perfect sense in context: he is a huge Oscar-less star, overdue after many nominations, in the biggest film of the year, playing an anti-establishment character immediately after the Vietnam War. I understand how he won, but how the popularity of his win has stood the test of time is surprising to me. He should have won for The Last Detail – imo his best performance to date.

    I would give that Oscar to Pacino – who played a similar anti-establishment character in DDA, but did it in a more comical “average Joe” kind of way. That is actually the second consecutive Oscar I would have given to Pacino, though the year before he would have been locked in a heated race with Nicholson for Chinatown (which is why I assume they both lost that year).

    Gene Hackman is, along with the two I mentioned above, among my favorite American actors of all time. He earned the two Oscars he has imo. I wouldn’t give him an Oscar for Bonnie and Clyde, as I found none of the men in that film particularly memorable. He was worthy and should have won for I Never Sang for My Father, though a win for that may have affected his chances for The French Connection, a far superior performance. He at least deserved a nomination for The Conversation. In fact, I would have eliminated that year’s winner (Carney) to include him. That lineup (Finney, Hackman, Hoffman, Nicholson, Pacino) would be a lineup of five of my favorite actors of all time (with Finney being the only weaker link, though I do like him. He also deserved a nomination for his last major film, The Royal Tenenbaums. I’m shocked he didn’t even get a nomination from, and even win, the Screen Actors Guild award considered how much they drool over veterans. Had he won the SAG, he would have had the Globe and SAG and may have been able to win the Oscar.

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