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Jane Fonda in 1971

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  • RobertPius
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    #182994

    Did she really stand a chace of losing? She’s seems pretty tentative taking the stage for Klute and apparently a lot of people didn’t clap for her.

    I know her Vietman controversy was swirling at the time.  Do you thing she came close to losing? Who would have beat her? She is kind of far and away the best in the category. I’d put Klute up there as one of the best Best actress performances ever.  Thoughts?  

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    dinasztie
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    #182996

    I agree, it’s one of the best performances I’ve ever seen and the personal best of Fonda’s (my favorite actress ever). Anyone who disses her performance REALLY pisses me off.

    I don’t think anyone was going to beat her, probably Glenda Jackson came closestto her because of the buzzed movie, but she had just won so suppose Jane won by a landslide (just like she deserved). And the real controversy around her started only after the Oscar (she went to Vietnam that summer, I think).

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    benbraddock
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    #182997

    JANE FONDA against 4 british actresses…Jane was the front runner all season with IMO, a great performance…The academy showed its good taste by not snubbing her because of her political affiliations and chose to honor her performance..

    Glenda Jackson had won the year before
    Janet Suzman was in a very weak film.
    Vanessa Redgrave was good in Mary Queen of Scots
    but it was NOT award worthy.
    Julie Christie, another previous winner in a
    Robert Altman film that was polarizing,
    non the less boring…

    JANE FONDA—SHOO-IN

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    OnTheAisle
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    #182998

    She is phenomenal in Klute. My favorite moment in her performance is when she is alone in her apartment and feeding her cat. In a simple clearly improvised gesture, she licks the fork after emptying the can of cat food. In that one act, she conveys a sense of isolation and vulnerability in Bree Daniels, a rather cynical, competent urban prostitute.

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    RobertPius
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    #182999

    The scene at the fruit stand where she stares at the toddler on his father’s shoulders is so beautiful.

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    Pavel Romanov
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    #183000

    She seemed nervous because she intended to give a political, anti-Vietnam war statement if she won. But her father talked her out of it. By 1971, she was already doing the FTA shows (Fuck/Free the Army with a few other actors) and she identified greatly with the various student, peace, and activist movements of the time. She’d later marry Tom Hayden, the co-founder of SDS. Plus, I think at this time, she was pretty opposed to the idea of the Oscars, which many of her generation of actors considered elitist and conservative, a reflection of bourgeoisie sensibilities. Compare this speech to the one she gave when she won for Coming Home or any other time she appeared at the Oscars as it is obvious her opinion of the awards changed over time.

    I think she made the right decision. Redgrave’s anti-zionist ramble would be a disaster a  few years later

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    Madson Melo
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    #183001

    Good win, I would vote for Christie or Jackson.

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    seoul
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    #183002

    She was a 100% lock because she had lost two years before as a frontrunner for They shoot horses. She went to Vietnam in July 1972 while she won in April 1972

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    marcelo
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    #183003

    I would vote for Glenda Jackson.

    1- Jackson
    2- Christie
    3- Fonda
    4- Redgrave
    5- Suzman

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    Milk Money
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    #183004

    One of the best female performances of the 1970’s and to think Barbra Streisand was offered the role first! I’m glad that the Academy did the right thing and crowned her the winner, but Jessica Walter was most certainly robbed of a nomination for Play Misty for Me especially with such a dull lineup. Some critics dismissed her perf as camp at the time, but it’s actually held up quite well over the years.

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    RobertPius
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    #183005

    Was Jessica Walter considered for lead? Was that the correct category placement? I’ve seen the movie but I forget exactly how much screen time she has in it. I kind of remember her being absent from it for long periods.

    It is a great performance.

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    Eddy Q
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    #183006

    She seemed nervous because she intended to give a political, anti-Vietnam war statement if she won. But her father talked her out of it. By 1971, she was already doing the FTA shows (Fuck/Free the Army with a few other actors) and she identified greatly with the various student, peace, and activist movements of the time. She’d later marry Tom Hayden, the co-founder of SDS. Plus, I think at this time, she was pretty opposed to the idea of the Oscars, which many of her generation of actors considered elitist and conservative, a reflection of bourgeoisie sensibilities. Compare this speech to the one she gave when she won for Coming Home or any other time she appeared at the Oscars as it is obvious her opinion of the awards changed over time.

    I think she made the right decision. Redgrave’s anti-zionist ramble would be a disaster a  few years later

    Redgrave’s speech is perhaps the most misunderstood in Oscar history; her phrase was “you have refused to be intimidated by the threats of a small bunch of Zionist hoodlums”, referring to members of the Jewish Defence League who had protested her nomination purely on political grounds and picketed the ceremony (I’ve even heard of allegations of death threats against Redgrave at the time, but can’t find any validation for it). The crucial words “small bunch” were ignored while “Zionist hoodlums” rang out across the theatre. Redgrave was anti-Zionist, but she had every right to mention the JDL threats in her speech as they were entirely relevant at the time, though she really should have known that the term “Zionist hoodlums” would be taken out of context whatever she said. A specific reference to the JDL would have been preferable.

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    Milk Money
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    #183007

    Was Jessica Walter considered for lead? Was that the correct category placement? I’ve seen the movie but I forget exactly how much screen time she has in it. I kind of remember her being absent from it for long periods.
    It is a great performance.

    She was nominated for a Best Actress Drama Globe (losing to Jane), but you’re right.  She totally could have gone supporting and gotten away with it.  I’m not so sure she could have taken down Cloris Leachman, though.

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    keithw
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    #183008

    I also think Glenda Jackson (Sunday Bloody Sunday) came in second. Jackson also had the advantage of a great role in Mary, Queen of Scots as well. Janet Suzman’s film was the only one of the five nominated lead actresses to earn a Best Picture nomination (Nicholas & Alexandra). I wouldn’t agree that it was a weak film for that reason. Nevertheless, I don’t think there was any way Jane Fonda could have lost.

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    RobertPius
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    #183009

    Fonda’s acceptance speech is pretty cool. She really milks the moment. I guess a lot of people were afraid what she’d say. If you watch it closely you can see how she hesitates and lets everyone hang in suspense for a while and then says the thing her father told her to say about it not being the time to say it. It must have been an incredibly dramatic moment at the time.

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