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Morricone: I’ll Never Work With Tarantino Again

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  • Scottferguson
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    #94926

    From Hollywood Reporter

    The 84-year-old conductor, who has worked with the “Django Unchained” director on four films, says he uses music “without coherence.”

    ROME – Ennio Morricone, the prolific Italian composer and conductor who has written many of the most recognizable film scores in history, says he will never again work with director Quentin Tarantino because he “places music in his films without coherence.”

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    Morricone’s work most recently appeared in Tarantino’s Django Unchained, the homage to the Spaghetti Western genre Morricone help popularize in the 1960s with classics including The Good The Bad and the Ugly (1966) and A Fistful of Dollars (1964), both directed by Sergio Leone.

    Morricone also wrote most of the award-winning soundtrack for Leone’s epic Once Upon a Time in America.

    The Django Unchanged soundtrack included Morricone’s “Ancora Qui,” sung by Elisa Toffoli, along with three short Morricone instrumental pieces.

    Morricone and Tarantino actively worked together on Inglourious Basterds, Tarantino’s 2009 reinterpretation of the end of World War II, and on both installments of the Kill Bill franchise.

    STORY: ‘Django Unchained’ Set for China Release

    But it’ll never happen again, according to the 84-year-old Morricone, who has written music for more than 500 films.

    “I wouldn’t like to work with him again, on anything,” Morricone told students in a music, film and television class at Rome’s LUISS University, according to Italian media reports Friday. “He said last year he wanted to work with me again ever since Inglourious Basterds, but I told him I couldn’t, because he didn’t give me enough time. So he just used a song I had written previously.”

    Tarantino is frustrating to work with, Morricone said, observing that the two-time Oscar winner “places music in his films without coherence” and “you can’t do anything with someone like that.”

    Morricone said he saw Django Unchained but was not impressed: “To tell the truth, I didn’t care for it,” he said. “Too much blood.”

    Morricone’s credits list includes films with iconic directors on both sides of the Atlantic, such as Europeans Bernardo Bertolucci, Pier Paolo Pasolini, horror master Dario Argento, Pedro Almodovar, Giuseppe Tornatore and Sergio Corbucci, the director of the original Django film, as well as Oliver Stone, Terrence Malick, Brian De Palma and Barry Levinson from Hollywood.

    After receiving five Oscar nominations for Best Musical Score between 1979 and 2001, Morricone was given an honorary Oscar in 2007, for lifetime achievement. He has also won nine David di Donatello awards, Italy’s highest film honors.

      

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    Daniel Montgomery
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    #94928

    Funny, I’ve always thought Quentin Tarantino is a director with one of the best ears for music.

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    Scottferguson
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    #94929

    For me, that was true until Django. I thought the use of music was confusing and erratic, much less effective than usual for his films.

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    seabel
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    #94930

    I see what Morricone means. I see it also in Christopher Plummer when he says he won’t work with Malick again.

    Maybe Tarantino’s final result of music in film is due to cutting themes, cutting pieces of music that have already been composed, conducted and performed with an orchestra (the work of lots of people, the dignity and artistic merit of people). We don’t know how does he work. That’s sort of mysterious but also strange, because Morricone has never COMPOSED for Tarantino. Tarantino has used previous existing Morricone music.

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    Scottferguson
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    #94931

    It could be a factor of two things – the rushed editing schedule (which I think hurt the film badly) and the loss of his longtime editor Sally Menke.

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    Daniel B.
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    #94932

    It could be a factor of two things – the rushed editing schedule (which I think hurt the film badly) and the loss of his longtime editor Sally Menke.

    …and this is only Tarantino’s second film (the other being Death Proof) to not be produced by Lawrence Bender. 

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    Daniel B.
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    #94933

    For me, that was true until Django. I thought the use of music was confusing and erratic, much less effective than usual for his films.

    I found the only really effective use of music in Django Unchained was Luis Bacalov’s theme from the original Django movie, and I would hardly call that an incredibly original idea to include that song (but like I said, it worked).
    It seems as though Django Unchained is Tarantino’s first movie that was unable to incorporate a pop song that worked well into the film. 

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    Tye-Grr
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    #94934

    I happened to love his use of music in ‘Django’, especially the original songs. But I guess that’s just me…

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    PJ Edwards
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    #94935

    Strange. Basterds and Django both got nommed for sound editing. 

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    Halo_Insider
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    #94936

    Here’s some apparent clarification from Morricone:

    http://insidemovies.ew.com/2013/03/18/ennio-morricone-is-not-feuding/

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    babypook
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    #94937

    O please. Famous last words’; although I LOVE Morricone’s work. His are among my very favorites.

    Btw I agree with Tye. The original music, especially the piece from Under Fire, is my all-time fave.

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    babypook
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    #94938

    Ok. Couldnt resist. Big reason why I loved Django:

    Jerry Goldsmith

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-j03UPaOCo&feature=player_detailpage

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