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New York Film Festival 2013

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  • Beau S.
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    Feb 10th, 2013
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    #109093

    The lineup for the 2013 NYFF has been announced. Here is the link to Sasha Stone’s article:

    http://www.awardsdaily.com/blog/official-new-york-film-festival-lineup/ 

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    Scottferguson
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    #109095

    As I posted elsewhere, they are showing at least 7 potential Oscar contenders, 4 of which were at Cannes, that are not (as now at least) not showing at Toronto, which is very unusual – Nebraska, All Is Lost, Inside Llewyn Davis, The Immigrant, Saving Mr Banks, Secret Life of Walter Mitty, Here.

    At Toronto and not NY – August Osage Co,The Past, Mandela, Therese (some others) – New York has the better of the deal for what it’s worth on paper at least 

    Very much a role reversal from most of recent decades.     

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    allabout oscars
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    Sep 20th, 2011
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    #109096

    I will be attending 3 films this year at the NYFF….very excited every year…
    COEN BROS FILM, NEBRASKA, AND THE IMMIGRANT

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    Beau S.
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    #109097

    I’m hoping to be able to see at least one film there this year (preferrably Her, Inside Llewyn Davis and Nebraska. I can wait for Walter Mitty and Captain Phillips since they will probably get mass wide releases). I live about a half hour away from the Lincoln Center where the festival is held. Just hoping that tickets to the general public will still be available/don’t sell out too quickly when they go up.

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    Bill Buchanan
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    #109098

    As I posted elsewhere, they are showing at least 7 potential Oscar contenders, 4 of which were at Cannes, that are not (as now at least) not showing at Toronto, which is very unusual – Nebraska, All Is Lost, Inside Llewyn Davis, The Immigrant, Saving Mr Banks, Secret Life of Walter Mitty, Here.

    At Toronto and not NY – August Osage Co,The Past, Mandela, Therese (some others) – New York has the better of the deal for what it’s worth on paper at least 

    Very much a role reversal from most of recent decades.     

    Saving Mr Banks is showing in New York? 

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    Stardust
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    #109099

    bump

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    Halo_Insider
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    #109100

    Surprisingly enough, I managed to get a last-minute ticket for the Captain Phillips screening tonight. Will try to share my thoughts on it afterward. 

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    PJ Edwards
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    #109101

    Hanks = In

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    Daniel Montgomery
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    #109102

    Been attending this festival, thought I’d share some HIGHLIGHTS so far, in no particular order:

    Le Week-End — Loved this romantic comedy/drama from Roger Michell. Lindsay Duncan and Jim Broadbent are outstanding. I loved the screenplay too.

    The Square — Great documentary about the Egyptian revolution focused in Tahrir Square. I don’t follow geopolitics as much as I should and this film is not only emotionally gripping but greatly informative. I’ve never seen or heard the conflict framed so clearly in all its conflicts and complexities.

    Inside Llewyn Davis — Saw this yesterday. Beautifully shot (Bruno Delbonnel is the man), beautiful music, moving story overall. I liked it, but find that just a day later it hasn’t really stuck in mind.

    Captain Phillips — Saw it this morning. Like “Zero Dark Thirty,” it’s a slow build, but the tension pays off in a big way. I don’t think it’s quite at the level of “Zero,” or Greengrass’s “United 93” for that matter, but it’s an excellent film overall, and a worthy Oscar-contender.

    About Time — I really hope this gets some traction, if not as an Oscar-contender, per se. I’m worried it’ll be dismissed as just a rom-com, but it’s smarter that most, sweet, thematically interesting (time travel used to explore ideas and not just as a gimmick), doesn’t resort to complications in the plot but rather lets its characters drive the story.

    American Promise — I liked this documentary about the relationship between race and education in NYC. It works extremely well as a personal story of two families over the course of 14 years, though I was hoping for more analysis and sociopolitical insight.

    LOWLIGHT:

    Child of God — A technically proficient, well-acted, but mostly unwatchable story of a man unable to function in society and eventually looks for companionship in dead bodies. James Franco is a good director. Scott Haze gives a courageous performance. I wish they’d made a different movie.

    SOMEWHERE IN-BETWEEN:

    Stranger By the Lake — Explicit and erotic gay content, and I think the film will develop a niche following. This is an eerie and effective noir thriller about a murder at a cruising spot. Its biggest problem is a protagonist whose decisions — the driving force of the story — never made any sense to me.

    Abuse of Weakness — Catherine Breillat’s semi-autobiographical drama about how a con artist took advantage of her poor health. Like “Stranger,” the film suffers from a lack of insight into its protagonist. And because it lacks insight, it does feel a bit repetitive and overlong. But Isabelle Huppert is very good.

    Alan Partridge: Alpha Papa — I’m aware of Steve Coogan’s Partridge character, but have never seen it before, so I was expecting to miss a lot of context and perhaps not get all the jokes. Maybe I did, maybe I didn’t. I liked a lot of it. Didn’t laugh out loud. Might just not be my cup of tea. Can’t discuss it in the context of the character overall.

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    Bill Buchanan
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    #109103

    I know we’ve just gone off emmy mode, but really? No one has posted the Captain Phillips reviews yet? Hanks is getting an unbelievable ammount of raves for his performance and the movie itself is getting some pretty good praise as well:
    (from awardswatch.com)

    Films debuts with 82 on Metacritic (after five reviews)

    Few more reviews rolling in, Hanks continuing to be raved, sounds like the last third of the film is where he really takes it home:

    Very positive from Cinemablend:
    With no explosions and only a handful of bullets, Greengrass creates one of the most impressive, captivating military spectacles in recent years.

    Hanks, who has proven too many times recently that he can coast and mug his way to disaster on screen, is dialed back and stern for most of the film, barking orders to his crew then attempting cold, simple reason with his captors. Near the end of the film he’s allowed to turn up the emotion, but even then– at the conclusion we’ve all been expecting– he manages to surprise. Hanks has been such a familiar star for so long that it was easy to think he’d run out of tricks (Cloud Atlas face tattoos aside), but he is so commanding, so authentic here, taking what could be cheap, sentimental heroism and creating a real but extraordinary human who is just smart enough to survive.
    http://www.cinemablend.com/new/NYFF-…ips-39587.html

    Very positive from Flavorwire:
    The Gripping ‘Captain Phillips’ redefines Tom Hanks — Again
    Which brings us back to Hanks. This is a performance that sneaks up on you; it appears at first to be one of his standard Everyman turns, perhaps even less than that, as it involves a Northeastern accent that is, initially at least, a little on the dodgy side. (Is there any dialect that’s more jarring to hear from a non-native?) Greengrass’ procedural, no-nonsense style means it’s not a film of big Acting Moments, though there’s something indescribable about the look in Hanks’s eyes as he watches, helplessly, while the ladder attaches and these men board his ship.
    But in those closing scenes, we see the accumulation of this performance, and what it has been working towards — a symphony of overwhelming emotion and total surrender to the character.
    It seems strange to say that an actor as awarded and acclaimed as Tom Hanks is still capable of surprising us. But he does in Captain Phillips, which is one of the best films of the year.
    http://flavorwire.com/417445/the-gri…m-hanks-again/


    9/10 from Screencrush:
    I could tell you about “the end of ‘Captain Phillips’” but even knowing what happens would not explain what is so effective about it. Greengrass’ vice-grip editing builds the standoff between the pirates and the US Navy to white-knuckle levels and holds it there for dangerous lengths of time. (Lots of camera rocking; avoid the front rows if you can.) Tom Hanks is no slouch, but his performance in the film’s third act might be a career best. He goes well beyond “making choices” to bringing about physical change to his body. It’s a very rare thing to see done so well in a mainstream movie.
    http://screencrush.com/captain-phillips-review/

    Negative from Village Voice:
    Doggedly cutting or panning away from Hanks to the point that there’s little chance for an authentic performance to blossom on-screen, Greengrass’ camerawork is so consistently unstable and nauseating [insert obligatory sea-sickness joke here] that it proves not a reflection of its protagonists’ anxieties but, instead, merely an affection that undermines its own effectiveness by calling such attention to itself.
    http://www.villagevoice.com/2013-09-…tain-phillips/

    david ehrlich @davidehrlich 
    CAPTAIN PHILLIPS: so tense it makes Gravity feel like a foot massage. the human fallout of macro-economic horrors. Greengrass’ most urgent.



    kateyrich @kateyrich 
    Captain Phillips is damn good. Tom Hanks proves a great star performance doesn’t have to be transformative– simple, dominant, powerful. 

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    Halo_Insider
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    #109104

    Saw Captain Phillips last night, and I think my opinion pretty much echoes Daniel’s. Probably one of Hanks’ best leading efforts in a while (exluding Cloud Atlas, which I haven’t yet seen). He’s very effective in the way that he handles the character when interacting with the pirates, particularly Barkhad Abdi. Also, the last 15 minutes or so of the film are really outstanding in how tense they are. A satisfying film overall, solidly directed by Paul Greengrass.

    That said, I didn’t quite fall *in love* with the film, and I think it has to do with that slow build that Daniel was talking about. While watching it, I spent a lot of time admiring the technical aspects, as well the performances, but I rarely felt immersed into the world until those last few scenes. I’m thinking that there will be quite a few films that I’ll like more than this as Oscar season proceeds. Even so, it does come together pretty well, so I would not begrudge any Oscar nominations that come its way. 

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    Daniel Montgomery
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    #109105

    My feelings do greatly echo yours, Halo_Insider. I think the film is involving throughout, but not quite gripping all the way through. I found myself not on the edge of my seat until the climax. On the other hand, I don’t know that the climax and conclusion would have been as impactful as they were if Greengrass and company hadn’t effectively the groundwork throughout. It’ll be interesting to see how it holds up on a second viewing if I get to see it again.

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    AviChristiaans
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    #109106

    Seems the coveted NYFF Secret Screening won’t be on the cards this year, which is kinda sad. 

    NY Film Festival “Secret Screening” Not Happening

    I learned earlier today (and I’m told that some kind of statement will be forthcoming) that the currently running New York Film Festival (9.27 to 10.13) won’t be presenting a secret screening this year. As I hear it, the festival’s programming director Kent Jones had hoped to arrange a special showing of Martin Scorsese‘s Wolf of Wall Street, but that dream went south when a elephant-sized cut delivered by Scorsese and editor Thelma Schoonmaker failed to satisfy Paramount Pictures, the film’s distributor, necessitating their return to the editing room. For whatever reason no other unreleased film quite fit the bill. A fair-sized portion of Wes Anderson‘s The Grand Budapest Hotel was viewed but it’s nowhere close to being completed. David O. Russell‘s American Hustle seemed like a good candidate but it’s currently going through a fine-tuning process via research screenings and isn’t quite ready to be shown. I’m guessing that the NYFF statement will say something like “with sad regret we’ve decided not to have a NY Film Festival secret screening this year but we’re having a great festival regardless,” etc.

    http://www.hollywood-elsewhere.com/2013/10/ny-film-festival-secret-screening-not-happening/

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    Daniel Montgomery
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    #109107

    Have had a busy few days at the festival:

    All is Lost — The biggest surprise for me is that this is really a director’s showcase and not an actor’s showcase. Robert Redford is perfectly fine, and certainly physically impressive, but he only has a line or two of dialogue throughout the whole film, and his character is written (or not written as the case may be) to be anonymous, and directed to be little more than stoic.

    I think it’s a pretty good film for the most part, with great use of sound (Mixing and/or Editing nominations would be warranted) to really envelop the audience in the sensory experience of being lost at sea. It has some frustrating moments, though, that feel like the screenplay jerking us (and the main character) around. I have mixed feelings about the ending.

    Nebraska —  My least favorite Alexander Payne film in quite some time, though he sets himself quite a high bar to clear. I actually liked this, though it took about halfway through to win me over. In the first half all the characters feel like one-joke caricatures, and those jokes didn’t really land with me. But he deepens the characters in the second half and it becomes quite touching. Interestingly, the film is set up around a MacGuffin — Bruce Dern thinks he’s won a million dollar sweepstakes — but it’s also about a man who himself is in need of a MacGuffin. Were it not for some goal or pursuit to live for, whether real or imagined, he might never get out of bed in the morning.

    The Invisible Woman —  Beautifully styled. Costumes, cinematography, production design, score all first-rate. And the performances are all very good. As a whole, though, I had trouble connecting with it emotionally. It spends a long time building up to the affair between Charles Dickens and his younger mistress, but once it gets there it just kind of skims the surface. There’s also some shifting between time periods that I found a bit awkward, and long walks on the beach that don’t end up having the thematic import I’d expected.

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    Scottferguson
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    #109108

    I totally agree with you about All Is Lost. It is indeed a director’s film first and foremost. I have no idea why people think that Redford is such a strong candidate to be nominated, let alone win. He’s decent but for me nothing special. And I also don’t get the idea that there is some sentiment within the Academy that Redford is due for actor. I don’t think that exists. I wouldn’t be shocked if he isn’t nominated; he’d be amazed if he wins.

    I disagree about Nebraska, which I think is by some distance Payne’s best film. It also will likely be his least popular (it is more alientating that his previous work). His direction jumped for me by a significant degree over his past films. For me, this is one of the top 4 American film releases of 2013 I’ve seen (along with Gravity, Before Midnight and Frances Ha). I do think you’re right about it taking its time to develop, but I think that’s the point. The film grew on me after a day or two – be curious to hear what you think about it on reflection.

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