Overdue Best Actress Nominees

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  • Nate
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    #94107

    By “overdue,” I mean anyone that was ever nominated for the Best Actress Oscar and hasn’t won an Oscar and is still alive. In a category that now features winners born in every decade in the 20th century (which has to be some kind of record, right?), I was just checking the records and counted that there are “only” (this seems small compared to other categories) 75 living actress nominated in this category who have yet to win. They are (in order of their first nomination for Best Actress):

    Eleanor Parker: 3 Best Actress nominations (current age: 90)

    Julie Harris: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 87)

    Leslie Caron: 2 Best Actress nominations (current age: 81)

    Carroll Baker: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 81)

    Doris Day: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 88)

    Piper Laurie: 1 Best Actress nomination, plus 2 Best Supporting Actress nominations (current age: 81)

    Debbie Reynolds: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 80)

    Samantha Eggar: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 73)

    Anouk Aimée: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 80)

    Geneviève Bujold: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 70)

    Jane Alexander: 2 Best Actress nominations, plus 2 Best Supporting Actress nominations (current age: 73)

    Ali MacGraw: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 73)

    Sarah Miles: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 71)

    Janet Suzman: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 74)

    Diana Ross: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 68)

    Cicely Tyson: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 79)

    Liv Ullmann: 2 Best Actress nominations (current age: 74)

    Marsha Mason: 4 Best Actress nominations (current age: 70)

    Diahann Carroll: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 77)

    Valerie Perrine: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 69)

    Gena Rowlands: 2 Best Actress nominations (current age: 82)

    Isabelle Adjani: 2 Best Actress nominations (current age: 57)

    Ann-Margret: 1 Best Actress nomination, plus 1 Best Supporting Actress nomination (current age: 71)

    Carol Kane: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 60)

    Marie-Christine Barrault: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 68)

    Talia Shire: 1 Best Actress nomination, plus 1 Best Supporting Actress nomination (current age: 66)

    Bette Midler: 2 Best Actress nominations (current age: 67)

    Mary Tyler Moore: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 76)

    Debra Winger: 3 Best Actress nominations (current age: 57)

    Julie Walters: 1 Best Actress nomination, plus 1 Best Supporting Actress nomination (current age: 63)

    Judy Davis: 1 Best Actress nomination, plus 1 Best Supporting Actress nomination (current age: 57)

    Kathleen Turner: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 58)

    Sigourney Weaver: 2 Best Actress nominations, plus 1 Best Supporting Actress nomination (current age: 63)

    Glenn Close: 3 Best Actress nominations, plus 3 Best Supporting Actress nominations (current age: 65)

    Sally Kirkland: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 71)

    Melanie Griffith: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 55)

    Pauline Collins: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 72)

    Michelle Pfeiffer: 2 Best Actress nominations, plus 1 Best Supporting Actress nomination (current age: 54)

    Laura Dern: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 46)

    Catherine Deneuve: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 69)

    Mary McDonnell: 1 Best Actress nomination, plus 1 Best Supporting Actress nomination (current age: 60)

    Angela Bassett: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 54)

    Stockard Channing: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 69)

    Miranda Richardson: 1 Best Actress nomination, plus 1 Best Supporting Actress nomination (current age: 54)

    Winona Ryder: 1 Best Actress nomination, plus 1 Best Supporting Actress nomination (current age: 41)

    Elisabeth Shue: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 49)

    Sharon Stone: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 54)

    Brenda Blethyn: 1 Best Actress nomination, plus 1 Best Supporting Actress nomination (current age: 67)

    Kristin Scott Thomas: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 52)

    Emily Watson: 2 Best Actress nominations (current age: 46)

    Helena Bonham Carter: 1 Best Actress nomination, plus 1 Best Supporting Actress nomination (current age: 46)

    Fernanda Montenegro: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 83)

    Annette Bening: 3 Best Actress nominations, plus 1 Best Supporting Actress nomination (current age: 54)

    Janet McTeer: 1 Best Actress nomination, plus 1 Best Supporting Actress nomination (current age: 51)

    Julianne Moore: 2 Best Actress nominations, plus 2 Best Supporting Actress nominations (current age: 52)

    Joan Allen: 1 Best Actress nomination, plus 2 Best Supporting Actress nominations (current age: 56)

    Laura Linney: 2 Best Actress nominations, plus 1 Best Supporting Actress nomination (current age: 49)

    Salma Hayek: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 46)

    Diane Lane: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 48)

    Keisha Castle-Hughes: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 22)

    Samantha Morton: 1 Best Actress nomination, plus 1 Best Supporting Actress nomination (current age: 35)

    Naomi Watts: 2 Best Actress nominations (current age: 44)

    Catalina Sandino Moreno: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 31)

    Imelda Staunton: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 57)

    Felicity Huffman: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 50)

    Keira Knightley: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 27)

    Ellen Page: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 26)

    Carey Mulligan: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 27)

    Gabourey Sidibe: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 29)

    Michelle Williams: 2 Best Actress nominations, plus 1 Best Supporting Actress nomination (current age: 32)

    Viola Davis: 1 Best Actress nomination, plus 1 Best Supporting Actress nomination (current age: 47)

    Rooney Mara: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 27)

    Jessica Chastain: 1 Best Actress nomination, plus 1 Best Supporting Actress nomination (current age: 35)

    Emmanuelle Riva: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 86)

    Quvenzhané Wallis: 1 Best Actress nomination (current age: 9)

    Based on when they received their nominations and their current ages (a sad, but relevant, fact), it looks to me like Chastain and Williams are the most likely to win at their next nominations. 27-year-olds Knightley, Mara, and Mulligan are possibles in the future, given the right part. Veterans like Bening, Linney, and Moore appear to need the right part to get them the attention needed to get them across the finish line. And, as much as I’d love to see one of these women who are 70+ get a great part and win, it looks doubtful to me. Anyway, since previous nominee status in this category can at least aid one to victory (and possibly helped this year’s acting winners Lawrence and Hathaway to victory), I just though I’d point this out. Any other thoughts?

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    Morgan Henard
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    #94109

    It’s such a slippery slope. Three of the busiest most sought after actresses in the biz are Annette Bening, Laura Linney, and Julianne Moore. They have a few duds here and there but for the most part their performance nails it every time. I feel they’ll get their long overdue Oscar within 10 years.

    Glenn Close wants it very much. It’s ironic that it took her so many years to get Albert Nobbs made and distributed because it was released in such an extremely competitive year for actresses in leading roles (Streep/Davis/Williams/Mara/Swinton). But had she waited just one year later she would have swept everything. 

    Sigourney Weaver needs to be way choosier about her projects. Thumps up for Political Animals, Prayers for Bobby, and Avatar. Massive thumbs down for Abduction where she had one-on-one scene time with the film’s lead, Taylor Lautner. 

    Michelle Pfeiffer simply must work more. She dominated the big screen from 88-02. If she could land a role like Helen Hunt’s in The Sessions, the Oscar would be hers. 

    Closest to nabbing it: Jessica Chastain. It-girl who truly knocks out each performance regardless of how great (Take Shelter), good (The Help, Zero Dark Thirty), mediocre (Texas Killing Fields), or bad (Lawless) a film is. 

    Speaking of Chastain, she relinquished the lead in Diana and Naomi Watts swooped in and replaced her. She very easily could get it on the next round.  

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    BrokenFan
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    #94110

    Meryl Streep is due for her 4th Statue. 

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    seabel
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    #94111

    Meryl Streep is due for her 4th Statue. 

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    KT
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    #94112

    I seriously wonder what many of these actresses think of Meryl Streep, the one person their age who seems to be getting first-look at the best material and in the most demand.  Yes, Streep is hard not to like, but when you’re someone in the industry competing against her to get parts (the Glenn Closes, the Michelle Pfeiffers, the Sigourney Weavers, the Annette Benings, even winners like Susan Sarandon, Sally Field, Sissy Spacek, and Jessica Lange), which in the first place are very scarce for that particular age bracket, hmmm….

    Yes, the Best Actress category is quite a fascinating one, how someone can just swoop in who’s relatively unproven with just a few films and take the award while other actresses who have given great performance after performance remain unrecognized.  It’s all about the timing, I guess.  Maybe Glenn Close could’ve had more luck this year (though it was a very subdued performance); seeing her lose to Lawrence, though, would’ve been terrible eeeeek.  Sigourney needs to be choosier than that lol…I don’t think Political Animals was very good, but it’s all about keeping busy and relevant and she doesn’t get offered the best parts anymore.

    I wonder who will be the next actress to win a third Oscar. 

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    seabel
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    #94113

    Definitely. Some actresses hate Meryl Streep for this. You could feel this with Jessica Lange’s speech at the Golden Globes 2012 (American Horror Story).

    Tell that to Christina Ricci, whose Meryl Streep was Scarlett Johansson.

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    GoMe91
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    #94114

    I seriously wonder what many of these actresses think of Meryl Streep, the one person their age who seems to be getting first-look at the best material and in the most demand.  Yes, Streep is hard not to like, but when you’re someone in the industry competing against her to get parts (the Glenn Closes, the Michelle Pfeiffers, the Sigourney Weavers, the Annette Benings, even winners like Susan Sarandon, Sally Field, Sissy Spacek, and Jessica Lange), which in the first place are very scarce for that particular age bracket, hmmm….

    Yes, the Best Actress category is quite a fascinating one, how someone can just swoop in who’s relatively unproven with just a few films and take the award while other actresses who have given great performance after performance remain unrecognized.  It’s all about the timing, I guess.  Maybe Glenn Close could’ve had more luck this year (though it was a very subdued performance); seeing her lose to Lawrence, though, would’ve been terrible eeeeek.  Sigourney needs to be choosier than that lol…I don’t think Political Animals was very good, but it’s all about keeping busy and relevant and she doesn’t get offered the best parts anymore.

    I wonder who will be the next actress to win a third Oscar. 

    Well…you can say that about every acting category. But, y’know, keep harping on Jennifer Lawrence.

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    Anonymous
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    #94115

    People like Sigourney Weaver, Susan Sarandon or Jessica Lange take every role that is offered to them because they want to act. They love acting so much they don’t care if it’s Henry Cavill B-movie thriller, another Adam Sandler stupid comedy or Rachel McAdams fluff chick flick. They just want to work. It’s not their fault that Meryl is getting all the good roles. It’s not even Meryl’s fault. It’s the fault of the lazy producers.

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    seabel
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    #94116

    People like Sigourney Weaver, Susan Sarandon or Jessica Lange take every role that is offered to them because they want to act. They love acting so much they don’t care if it’s Henry Cavill B-movie thriller, another Adam Sandler stupid comedy or Rachel McAdams fluff chick flick. They just want to work. It’s not their fault that Meryl is getting all the good roles. It’s not even Meryl’s fault. It’s the fault of the lazy producers.

    They NEED to work.

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    KT
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    #94117

    Well…you can say that about every acting category. But, y’know, keep harping on Jennifer Lawrence.

    Oh, come on.  I haven’t harped on Jennifer Lawrence at all, just that had a Glenn Close been in the picture, someone who is well known, and Lawrence won there would’ve been louder public opinion (hence the eeek).  The thread is about overdue nominees, and I was just stating the obvious, trying to get at what it might feel like for a veteran actress who sees the type of roles that win, whether the award actually means something.
     

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    Marcus Snowden (The Artist Formerly Known as msnowden1)
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    #94118

    Jennifer Lawrence is NOT a veteran actress. She has only been acting for seven years. As you guys know, I LOVE me some JLaw, but I’m just stating the obvious. 

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    Boidiva02
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    #94119

    People like Sigourney Weaver, Susan Sarandon or Jessica Lange take every role that is offered to them because they want to act. They love acting so much they don’t care if it’s Henry Cavill B-movie thriller, another Adam Sandler stupid comedy or Rachel McAdams fluff chick flick. They just want to work. It’s not their fault that Meryl is getting all the good roles. It’s not even Meryl’s fault. It’s the fault of the lazy producers.

    This would explain Blythe Danners recent career.

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    GhostOrchid
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    #94120

    I don’t know, but since when actually people (critics or whoever) began to call Meryl Streep the “greatest living actress”?
    Having such a “nickname” is useful when you get projects. Plus she also became a box office draw lately, that also helps.
    Though Meryl had some kind of dry period in the nineties, she just went on working, no matter how small and unimportant the film was. She NOW gets the “good” roles simply because the attention is on her and even if the roles aren’t good at all, she seems to make them good at the very least.
    All in all…. she’s just lucky to become the inexplainable phenomina she’s right now.

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    Miss Frost
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    #94121

    Sigourney Weaver is an actress that is most overdue for an Oscar. I swear she should’ve been the victor with “Aliens.” A good makeup win would’ve been in 1997 with her supporting role in “The Ice Storm” though that was a very messed up year regarding the winners/nominees. With the projects she’s doing now, I wouldn’t hold my breath for her to ever win in the future.

    Streep (Along with Redgrave) is one of the most talented actors working today. It is no wonder she is getting all the lead roles these days. 

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    Anonymous
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    #94122

    Definitely. Some actresses hate Meryl Streep for this. You could feel this with Jessica Lange’s speech at the Golden Globes 2012 (American Horror Story).

    What?  Lange has contempt for no actress.  She’s barely aware of her own successes.  I think you’re reading into her speech too much, though I do love the way they cut to Meryl, who seems sincerely pleased to watch Lange win and to hear her speech.

    [quote=”Natasha”]People like Sigourney Weaver, Susan Sarandon or Jessica Lange take every role that is offered to them because they want to act. They love acting so much they don’t care if it’s Henry Cavill B-movie thriller, another Adam Sandler stupid comedy or Rachel McAdams fluff chick flick. They just want to work. It’s not their fault that Meryl is getting all the good roles. It’s not even Meryl’s fault. It’s the fault of the lazy producers.

    They NEED to work.[/quote]

    You must be thinking of Weaver and Sarandon, because Lange has periodically taken off years.  Lange loves to act because she acts to emote, i.e. to let out all of her crazy shit in a somewhat controlled, productive and therapeutic fashion.  She definitely doesn’t need the money or anymore acclaim. 

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