People who were nominated for films they were unhappy with

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  • RobertPius
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    #193973

    Debra Winger supposedly hated An Officer and a Gentleman. Cate Blanchett was upset a lot of her stuff in Notes on a Scandal was cut. Others you’ve read about? 

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    jf123
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    #193975

    Burt Reynolds hated doing Boogie Nights so much that he fired his agent who told him to do it.

    Woody Allen thinks Annie Hall is his worst film, even though it swept the Oscars that year. 

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    Halo_Insider
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    #193976

    Marlon Brando was angry that his character from A Streetcar Named Desire became a sex symbol, because Brando thought that the point of the role was that he was a terrible human being that epitomized the “brutal aggressiveness” that Brando hated.

    Elizabeth Taylor hated BUtterfield 8. I can’t say I blame her.

    As everyone probably knows, Alec Guinness was not a fan of Star Wars at all.

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    benbraddock
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    #193977

    DEBRA WINGER  did not hate An officer and a Gentleman..She hated working
    with Richard Gere who does have a smarmy reputation til to this day….
    Thats why he doesnt get oscar consideration…Hes worked with everyone and
    he is not well liked…He gave Winger a hard time making that film…acting like
     the true prima donna that he was then and is still now..

    ELIZABETH TAYLOR  hated Butterfield 8
    BARBRA STREISAND hated Funny Lady
    Everyone involved hated ISHTAR

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    FilmGuy619
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    #193978

    I don’t know if she hated it, but when Cate Blanchett’s Oscar clip for Elizabeth: The Golden Age played, she had this look on her face like “Eh, what am I doing here?”

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    MrGoodWood
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    #193979

    I don’t know if she hated it, but when Cate Blanchett’s Oscar clip for Elizabeth: The Golden Age played, she had this look on her face like “Eh, what am I doing here?”

    Yeah, she had said that she wasn’t proud of that performance and that she voted for Cotillard over herself

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    TerenceFletcher
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    #193980

    I read somewhere that Kate Winslet was not happy at all with her performance in Titanic.

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    RobertPius
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    #193981

    Yes. Kate Winslet was really sour on her experience making Titanic and was kind of bad mouthing the it….then when she realized what a hit it was going to be she changed her tune. 

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    KyleBailey
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    #193982

    Didn’t Viggo come out againt the Lord of the Rings films a few months ago? Wouldn’t blame him. 

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    seabel
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    #193983

    Kate Winslet’s little dissapointment with THE READER and Harvey Weinstein may be, according to some rumors, the cause of her Oscar retirement since 2009.

    Everyone involved hated ISHTAR

    What’s ISHTAR? I googled it but can’t find anything. 

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    seabel
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    #193984

    I don’t know if she hated it, but when Cate Blanchett’s Oscar clip for Elizabeth: The Golden Age played, she had this look on her face like “Eh, what am I doing here?”

    Maybe it had to do with the Academy’s disgusting taste with choosing Oscar clips only based on screamings out of context. 

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    Jason Travis
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    #193985

    Debra Winger supposedly hated An Officer and a Gentleman. Cate Blanchett was upset a lot of her stuff in Notes on a Scandal was cut. Others you’ve read about? 

    What was Cate Blanchett upset about regarding Notes on a Scandal? I never heard this, and am intrigued. I feel it’s one of her strongest roles.

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    Jason Travis
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    #193986

    Ingrid Bergman can be seen a bit annoyed that she won her third Oscar for Best Supporting Actress in Murder on the Orient Express. I think she was surprised:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ky5sW4no_cg

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    Jason Travis
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    #193987

    ACTORS APPEARING LESS THEN ENTHUSED WHEN WINNING:

    Faye Dunaway winning for Network (1976): Perhaps it was the style in the 70s to be a little more chill, but look at how cool Dunaway is upon accepting. And look at Diana Ross’s stone face when her name is read. Interesting. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ePkEsHmwCZE

    Jessica Lange winning for Blue Sky (1994)- the film had been shelved for three years because of Orion’s bankruptcy, so Lange seemed grateful, albeit not the most exicted. There were a lot of issues with that small film. A fiery performance though. 1994 is considered by many the weakest year for Best Actress since the 1975 lineup. All five best actress nominees were not in Best Picture contenders, and two of the nominees- Winona Ryder and Susan Sarandon- weren’t even up for Globes before their Oscar bids.

    George C. Scott initially refused to accept his Oscar for Patton, but Goldie Hawn was happy to announce his name.

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    John
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    #193988

    Digging back a ways . . .

    Orson Welles (1942): The Magnificent Ambersons was nominated for 1942 Outstanding Motion Picture. He was credited as producer, director and screenwriter. (Mrs. Miniver won, among the earliest U.S. wartime films, an MGM adapation of the 1940 Brit. novel.) Welles hated the final theatrical release cut that was done by RKO without him feeling that it had completely destroyed his film. While the award went to the production company until 1950, Welles would have received award credit as its producer. After 1950, the award goes directly to the credited producer(s). Welles was still working on a final cut when he had to go to Brazil to direct a wartime film for the U.S. Government. Unlike the final cut approval Welles had with Citizen Kane, this had been negotiated out of the Ambersons contract. While he was in Brazil, RKO studios executives butchered the movie, removing 40 minutes (basically the last, seventh, reel), and completely reshot an entirely different ending. The Magnificent Ambersons’ “seventh reel” is one of the mythical Holy Grails of lost cinema footage (RKO destroyed the cut footage). It is occasionally referred to by those in the industry who know what happened. If you’ve seen The Magnificent Ambersons and the ending seems a bit abrupt, now you know why.

    Marlon Brando (1972): Already mentioned for Streetcar Named Desire, he also detested Last Tango in Paris (1972), a Bernardo Bertolucci film for which he received a Best Actor in a Leading Role nomination. Like the leading actress (Maria Schneider), he felt completely violated by the resulting film, vowing to never make another movie like that, and did not speak to Bertolucci for fifteen years afterward. Note that actors and actresses, in spite of seeing screenplays and scripts, do not necessarily know how a movie will turn out as scenes are often filmed out of sequence with multiple takes. All they can see during production are daily rushes, if they bother to attend, until a rough cut, or sometimes until a final cut, is screened for them,. The production process makes it difficult for many actors to see the forest because they’re dealing only with the individual trees during filming.

    Woody Allen (1986) Annie Hall was already mentioned. He also did not like how Hannah and Her Sisters (1986) turned out. It was nominated for seven academy awards, including Best Picture which it did not win (would have gone to Robert Greenhut, the producer). Allen was nominated for Best Screenplay, Original (which he won) and Best Director (which he didn’t win). It’s also one of his financially most successful and remains among one of his most critically acclaimed movies. Similar to Annie Hall, he sees it as a compromised vision: “Hannah and Her Sisters was a big disappointment because I had
    to compromise my original intention tremendously to survive with the
    film.

    There are a couple epic Oscar magnets that stand out even though the very famous individuals involved with them were not Oscar nominated:

    Spartacus (1960):
    Stanley Kubrick did not like Spartacus, which received six Oscar nominations, winning two (none of them for Kubrick). The movie was really a Kirk Douglas pet project into which Douglas put considerable money. Both Douglas and the studio also backing it ran roughshod over Kubrick. This shows as it is the least Kubrick-esque of all his movies. He vowed never to do another film over which he did not have complete artistic control. Stanley Kubrick also detested “Fear and Desire” or “Killer’s Kiss”, his
    first two feature films, characterizing them as amateurish. Decidedly
    flawed but they show glimpses of the Kubrick of the future. All three were omitted from a VHS Tape and DVD compendium set of his movies that was released shortly after his last film, Eyes Wide Shut (1999).

    Cleopatra (1963):
    Based on the Lew Wallace novel, this outrageously expensive epic film with huge budget overruns all but bankrupted 20th Century-Fox. It has the dubious honor of being the only highest grossing film of the year to run at a loss, and it was not just a small loss. At $18 Million in the red (1963 dollars; $339M in 2015 dollars), the loss was as epic as the movie. Enormous studio campaigning resulted in Cleopatra receiving nine Oscar nominations, winning four, but none of them were for two key people who didn’t like the resulting movie. Elizabeth Taylor felt the result was “vulgar” with all the battle scenes at the expense of the romantic triangle between Cleopatra, Julius Caesar and Mark Antony. Not too surprising Taylor, the diva, would feel that way. She had near zero screen time in the battle scenes. Joseph L. Mankiewicz was yet another directorial victim of studio editing butchery. His final cut and the one that premiered was four hours, which had already chopped out two hours from the initial version he screened for the studio executives. The theaters pitched a fit over a four hour movie that severely limited the number of showings per day (cineplexes didn’t exist; theaters had one screen). Mankiewicz suggested splitting the movie in two: Caesar and Cleopatra, and Antony and Cleopatra, to maintain its original length. Instead, the studio hurriedly chopped it down to just over three hours. They wanted to rush it out the door to leverage on the huge press the off-screen Richard Burton (Mark Antony) and Elizabeth Taylor (Cleopatra) romance was having as free marketing. Splitting it in two would have taken longer. Mankiewicz was not happy with the result as it introduced plot holes and eliminated important character development that showed what motivated and drove the principal characters. The four hour premiere version has been released on disc. The missing footage that could restore the six hour version has never been found.

    John

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