Home Forums Movies Rank the 1977 nominees

Rank the 1977 nominees

CREATE A NEW TOPIC
CREATE A NEW POLL
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
Created
2 years ago
Last Reply
2 years ago
17
replies
1296
views
9
users
6
3
2
  • RobertPius
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 22nd, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #220155

    I find this year so interesting. I saw Tina Fey on TCM and she said she thinks this is the best Oscar year ever. Don’t know if that is true but it is a good one.

    I think this may be the first ceremony I was aware of as a kid. (probably because of Star Wars, Close Encointers and Quinn Cummings, I was fascinated that a kid was included and wanted her to win. )

    So what do you think the order of finish was?

    I’ll say:

    Actor:

    Richard Dreyfuss, The Goodbye Girl
    Richard Burton, Equus
    John Travolta, Saturday Night Fever
    Marcello Mastroanni, A Special Day
    Woody Allen, Annie Hall

    Actress:

    Diane Keaton, Annie Hall
    Shirley MacLaine, The Turning Point
    Jane Fonda, Julia
    Marsha Mason, The Goodbye Girl
    Anne Bancroft, The Turnin Point

    Supporting Actor (this was probably realy close)

    Jason Robards, Julia
    Peter Firth, Equus
    Alec Guiness, Star Wars
    Maximillian Schell, Julia
    Mikail Barishvikov, The Turning Point

    Supporting Actress

    Vanessa Redgrave, Julia
    Melinda Dillon, Close Encounters of the Third Kind
    Tuesday Weld, Looking for Mr. Goodbar
    Quinn Cummings, The Goodbye Girl
    Leslie Browne, The Turning Point

    Picture (this  is hard)

    Annie Hall
    Julia
    The Turning Point
    The Goodbye Girl
    Star Wars

    Director

    Woody Allen, Annie Hall
    Herbert Ross, The Turning Point
    Fred Zinneman, Julia
    George Lucas, Star Wars
    Steven Spielberg, Close Encounters of the Third Kind 

     

    Reply
    dinasztie
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jun 5th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #220157

    Picture

    1. Annie Hall
    2. Star Wars (very close)
    3. Julia
    4. The Goodbye Girl
    5. The Turning Point (I actually really like this one)

    Director

    1. Woody
    2. Lucas
    3. Spielberg
    4. Zinnemann
    5. Ross

    Actor

    1. Travolta
    2. Allen
    3. Dreyfuss
    4. Mastroianni
    5. Burton (again, great performance, just a very strong field)

    Actress

    1. Keaton/Fonda (I can never really decide, probably Keaton, because she’s more iconic)
    2. Mason
    3. Bancroft
    4. MacLaine (again, very excellent)

    Supporting Actor

    1. Guiness
    2. Robards
    3. Firth
    4. Schell
    5. Barishnikov (now I’m saying WTF instead of excellent)

    Supporting Actress

    1. Redgrave (one of the best winners)
    2. Dillon
    3. Weld
    4. Cummings (excellent) 
    5. Browne (ummm…) 
     
    What a year! 

    ReplyCopy URL
    Andrew Carden
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jan 16th, 2016
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #220158

    Tina Fey considers ’77, with all of the lame “Turning Point” nominations, the strongest year at the Oscars? Hrm. Since I find both “Annie Hall” and the first “Star Wars” extremely overrated to boot, this is hardly among my favorite ones. “Close Encounters” was so robbed of a Picture nom.

    I’d have voted for “Julia,” Steven Spielberg, Richard Dreyfuss, Marsha Mason, Peter Firth and Melinda Dillon.

    ReplyCopy URL
    keithw
    Participant
    Joined:
    Aug 17th, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #220159

    I remember the year and, at the time, would have voted like this:
    Picture: The Goodbye Girl
    Actor:  Richard Dreyfuss, The Goodbye Girl
    Actress:  Marsha Mason, The Goodbye Girl
    Supporting Actor: Alec Guiness, Star Wars
    Supporting Actress:  Vanessa Redgrave, Julia
    Director:  Herbert Ross, The Turning Point

    In retrospect….my choices would have remained the same with the exception of Supporting Actor.  After rewatching Julia, I would choose Jason Robards if I voted today. 

    ReplyCopy URL
    RobertPius
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 22nd, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #220160

    Tina Fey considers ’77, with all of the lame “Turning Point” nominations, the strongest year at the Oscars? Hrm. Since I find both “Annie Hall” and the first “Star Wars” extremely overrated to boot, this is hardly among my favorite ones. “Close Encounters” was so robbed of a Picture nom.

    I’d have voted for “Julia,” Steven Spielberg, Richard Dreyfuss, Marsha Mason, Peter Firth and Melinda Dillon.

    She was a kid who loved Science fiction and wanted to move to NYC when she grew up so The Goodbye Girl and Annie Hall spoke to her.

    She did one of those TCM guest programmer nights. I thought she spoke quite eloquently about her favorite films (one of which was Goodbye Girl.)

    I don’t remember now if she said 1977 was the best or just her favorite. There’s a difference I guess.

    (I like that year too as I said but I never really got Turning Point. I remember watching it a lot as a teen when it was on TV trying to appreciate it what I thought was supposed to be so good. It is an awful lot of ballet and if you don’t like ballet that can be tiresome. I always liked the famous fight though. (and yeah, How the heck did it get those supporting noms? At least pick Tom Skerrit. Who got left out? Any ideas?)   

    ReplyCopy URL
    RobertPius
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 22nd, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #220161

    BTW this is a fascinating year off stage as well. That Vanessa Redgrave controversy was huge. I’ve seen her speech and Paddy Chayefsky’s responce but I didn’t know how tense the whole thing was off camera.

    There was genuine fear that someone would try to shoot her when she won and the academy had sharp shooters stationed throughout the scene. 

    I glanced thru a recent Redgrave bio in the library a few months ago and the account of this night was fascinating.

    Much more than “who will win” and “what are you wearing.” 

    ReplyCopy URL
    OnTheAisle
    Participant
    Joined:
    Sep 19th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #220162

    Tina Fey considers ’77, with all of the lame “Turning Point” nominations, the strongest year at the Oscars? Hrm.

    I don’t think The Turning Point is lame. Here is my review from the TCM thread about a year ago

    I curled up this evening with the beverage of choice from a fillette of champagne to enjoy a showing of The Turning Point. This 1977 charmer suffers under the dubious honor (with The Color Purple) of receiving and losing the most Oscar nominations in Academy history. Such a distinction has somewhat tarnished the reputation of this semi-autobiographical backstage ballet story.

    Famed ballerina and executive producer of the film Nora Kaye grew up with her friend Isabel Mirrow Brown. The childhood friends shared a love of dance. Brown chose a marriage and motherhood while Kaye went on to much acclaim on stage. This story serves as the origins of the film’s conflict between former ballet dancer DeeDee (Shirley MacLaine) and legendary ballerina Emma (Anne Bancroft) who reunite when DeeDee’s daughter Emilia prepares to join Emma’s company as a featured dancer. To add to the biographical nature of the piece, when Gelsey Kirkland’s drug addiction prevented her participation, Isabel Mirrow Brown’s daughter Leslie was cast as Emilia.

    Noted playwright and lifelong friend of Nora Kaye, Oscar nominated Arthur Laurents scripted a tale of envy and regret for both women who have arrived at middle age questioning their choices in youth that gave them the lives they now lead. Bancroft is superb. She is amazing and easily conveys Emma’s success and fear of aging. In this performance, she moves differently than she has as Annie Sullivan or Mrs. Robinson. I believe she has been a dancer her entire life.

    Surprisingly, MacLaine who is a dancer is less convincing. She beautifully rages and simmers as she struggles to accept her youthful choices of family over career. She simply pales in comparison to Bancroft. The two women wound each other and then run throughout the film until the emotions are released in a heartbreaking yet funny fight. Both women were justifiably nominated for Best Actress.

    Also nominated was Leslie Browne for her debut as Emilia. She is only 19 and the camera simply loves her. When she is raging drunk alone in a bar and approached by two men who continue to buy her drinks, I watched horrified at what might happen.  A foolish fear. This is The Turning Point. The only bad thing that happens here is that a witty bon mot may not be delivered with precise timing. And fortunately, that never occurs.

    Like Roman Holiday gave audiences a peek at Italian sights, The Turning Point gives the audience a rare look at ballet. We see the emotional turmoil and the intense physical price to produce great art. The film is beautifully shot by Oscar nominated Robert Surtees and edited by Oscar nominated William Reynolds to give the average viewer a distinct appreciation for dance in brief vignettes intercut into the story. This includes the film debut of Best Supporting Actor nominee Mikhail Baryshnikov. For those who only know him as Carrie Bradshaw’s bad boyfriend and have not seen the dancer in his youth at the pinnacle of his gifts, these dance sequences are pure gold.

     

    So many biographical films ultimately are rewarded by Oscar. There is simplicity of honest emotions in the story of the bonds between Emma and DeeDee that touches me with its truth. Lifelong friends know our darkest moments and greatest joys. Secrets are nonexistent and the emotions on display here feel cathartic.

    ReplyCopy URL
    RobertPius
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 22nd, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #220163

    [quote=”AwardsConnect”]

    Tina Fey considers ’77, with all of the lame “Turning Point” nominations, the strongest year at the Oscars? Hrm.

    I don’t think The Turning Point is lame. Here is my review from the TCM thread about a year ago

    I curled up this evening with the beverage of choice from a fillette of champagne to enjoy a showing of The Turning Point. This 1977 charmer suffers under the dubious honor (with The Color Purple) of receiving and losing the most Oscar nominations in Academy history. Such a distinction has somewhat tarnished the reputation of this semi-autobiographical backstage ballet story.

    Famed ballerina and executive producer of the film Nora Kaye grew up with her friend Isabel Mirrow Brown. The childhood friends shared a love of dance. Brown chose a marriage and motherhood while Kaye went on to much acclaim on stage. This story serves as the origins of the film’s conflict between former ballet dancer DeeDee (Shirley MacLaine) and legendary ballerina Emma (Anne Bancroft) who reunite when DeeDee’s daughter Emilia prepares to join Emma’s company as a featured dancer. To add to the biographical nature of the piece, when Gelsey Kirkland’s drug addiction prevented her participation, Isabel Mirrow Brown’s daughter Leslie was cast as Emilia.

    Noted playwright and lifelong friend of Nora Kaye, Oscar nominated Arthur Laurents scripted a tale of envy and regret for both women who have arrived at middle age questioning their choices in youth that gave them the lives they now lead. Bancroft is superb. She is amazing and easily conveys Emma’s success and fear of aging. In this performance, she moves differently than she has as Annie Sullivan or Mrs. Robinson. I believe she has been a dancer her entire life.

    Surprisingly, MacLaine who is a dancer is less convincing. She beautifully rages and simmers as she struggles to accept her youthful choices of family over career. She simply pales in comparison to Bancroft. The two women wound each other and then run throughout the film until the emotions are released in a heartbreaking yet funny fight. Both women were justifiably nominated for Best Actress.

    Also nominated was Leslie Browne for her debut as Emilia. She is only 19 and the camera simply loves her. When she is raging drunk alone in a bar and approached by two men who continue to buy her drinks, I watched horrified at what might happen.  A foolish fear. This is The Turning Point. The only bad thing that happens here is that a witty bon mot may not be delivered with precise timing. And fortunately, that never occurs.

    Like Roman Holiday gave audiences a peek at Italian sights, The Turning Point gives the audience a rare look at ballet. We see the emotional turmoil and the intense physical price to produce great art. The film is beautifully shot by Oscar nominated Robert Surtees and edited by Oscar nominated William Reynolds to give the average viewer a distinct appreciation for dance in brief vignettes intercut into the story. This includes the film debut of Best Supporting Actor nominee Mikhail Baryshnikov. For those who only know him as Carrie Bradshaw’s bad boyfriend and have not seen the dancer in his youth at the pinnacle of his gifts, these dance sequences are pure gold.

     

    So many biographical films ultimately are rewarded by Oscar. There is simplicity of honest emotions in the story of the bonds between Emma and DeeDee that touches me with its truth. Lifelong friends know our darkest moments and greatest joys. Secrets are nonexistent and the emotions on display here feel cathartic.

    [/quote]

    That was very interesting.

    I want to see the movie again as an adult and see how I like it. I didn’t know it plays on TCM. I’ve never seen it there, I’ll have to watch for it.

     

    ReplyCopy URL
    Andrew Carden
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jan 16th, 2016
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #220164

    Well, I would agree that Bancroft > MacLaine.

    ReplyCopy URL
    babypook
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 4th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #220165

    I find this year so interesting. I saw Tina Fey on TCM and she said she thinks this is the best Oscar year ever. Don’t know if that is true but it is a good one.

    I think this may be the first ceremony I was aware of as a kid. (probably because of Star Wars, Close Encointers and Quinn Cummings, I was fascinated that a kid was included and wanted her to win. )

    So what do you think the order of finish was?

    I’ll say:

    Actor:

    Richard Dreyfuss, The Goodbye Girl
    Richard Burton, Equus
    John Travolta, Saturday Night Fever
    Marcello Mastroanni, A Special Day
    Woody Allen, Annie Hall

    I adore Marcellos’ work

    Actress:

    Diane Keaton, Annie Hall
    Shirley MacLaine, The Turning Point
    Jane Fonda, Julia
    Marsha Mason, The Goodbye Girl
    Anne Bancroft, The Turnin Point

    Sublime

    Supporting Actor (this was probably realy close)

    Jason Robards, Julia
    Peter Firth, Equus
    Alec Guiness, Star Wars
    Maximillian Schell, Julia
    Mikail Barishvikov, The Turning Point

    Pretty much tied for me. All of them have points in their favour.

    Supporting Actress

    Vanessa Redgrave, Julia
    Melinda Dillon, Close Encounters of the Third Kind
    Tuesday Weld, Looking for Mr. Goodbar
    Quinn Cummings, The Goodbye Girl
    Leslie Browne, The Turning Point

    Would have loved to see Melinda win for Absence of Malice, but Maureen Stapleton is awesome as well

    Picture (this  is hard)

    Annie Hall
    Julia
    The Turning Point
    The Goodbye Girl
    Star Wars

    A big thank you to George Lucas and friends!

    Director

    Woody Allen, Annie Hall
    Herbert Ross, The Turning Point
    Fred Zinneman, Julia
    George Lucas, Star Wars
    Steven Spielberg, Close Encounters of the Third Kind 

     

    ReplyCopy URL
    DamianWayne
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jul 21st, 2015
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #220166

    The Turning Point was almost Lifetime-esque bad. I cannot believe it got 11 nominations. I wasn’t that fond of Julia either. Opening Night, 3 Women and Close Encounters would have made better choices.

    ReplyCopy URL
    RobertPius
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 22nd, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #220167

    The Turning Point was almost Lifetime-esque bad. I cannot believe it got 11 nominations. I wasn’t that fond of Julia either. Opening Night, 3 Women and Close Encounters would have made better choices.

    Wow I forgot 3 Women was that year. How on earth did Sissy Spacek not get a supporting nomination? She is excellent in that film.  (or was she considered for lead? It has been a few years since I saw that. I remember her having a smallish part on Duvall being the lead. correct?) 

    ReplyCopy URL
    Guest2014
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 15th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #220168

    Best Picture
    1.  Star Wars.

    Everything else besides Annie Hall.  
    Annie Hall – DISQUALIFIED. 

    ReplyCopy URL
    KyleBailey
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 15th, 2013
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #220169

    This is one of those years that I am ok with Annie Hall winning Best Picture even though I like Star Wars an inch more but they are pretty much a tie in my book. I think The Goodbye Girl is a strong 3rd. Julia and especially The Turning Point underwhelmed me so I can’t say this was my favorite Oscar year. 

    My votes

    Picture- Star Wars
    Director- George Lucas
    Actor- Woody Allen
    Actress- Diane Keaton (Marsha Mason a STRONG 2nd. Very close)
    Supporting Actor- Alec Guinness
    Supporting Actress- Quinn Cummings

    I would have nominated High Anxiety and Eraserhead in place for The Turning Point and Julia. I’ve been dying to see Equus but no library or streaming service has it 

    ReplyCopy URL
    Andrew Carden
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jan 16th, 2016
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #220170

    Wow I forgot 3 Women was that year. How on earth did Sissy Spacek not get a supporting nomination? She is excellent in that film.  (or was she considered for lead? It has been a few years since I saw that. I remember her having a smallish part on Duvall being the lead. correct?) 

    Indeed, Spacek was campaigned Supporting and actually won at NYFCC. Duvall was pushed Lead and won at both Cannes and LAFCA.

    ReplyCopy URL
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Similar Topics
RobertPius - Nov 22, 2017
Movies
Sam K - Nov 22, 2017
Movies