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Scarlett Johansson in Lucy/Under The Skin

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  • babypook
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    #150161

    Daniel wrote an article but I dont see a thread for this. Yes it’s Summer fare but it could be good news for Johansson.

    Dailies | Scarlett Johansson Accidentally Accesses 100 Percent of Her Brain Power in First ‘Lucy’ Trailer (Video)

     

    Movies | By on April 2, 2014 @ 11:25 am Follow @gregatthewrap          


    Morgan Freeman plays a professor researching the powers humans could possess if they were just a little bit smarter

    Scarlett Johansson is already the Marvel superhero Black Widow in this weekend’s “Captain America: The Winter Soldier,” but this summer she’ll be showcasing actual super powers as “Lucy.”

    The first trailer (above) for the upcoming action flick from writer/director Luc Besson (“The Professional”) shows Johansson — an American abducted somewhere in Asia and turned into a drug mule – accidentally accessing more cerebral capacity than any human being on the planet when whatever drug that was surgically implanted in her stomach leaks into her system.


    As she gets closer to reaching 100 percent of her brain function, she continues to evolve into merciless warrior looking for revenge on her captors.

    Morgan Freeman plays a professor studying the untapped powers that lay dormant in humanity in the “Limitless”-like movie that Universal is releasing in theaters on Aug. 8.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MVt32qoyhi0&feature=player_embedded

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    babypook
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    #150163

    The reviews so far have been mixed for Under The Skin but it does have an 84 RT score so far.

    How an Undercover Scarlett Johansson Tricked Men Into Thinking She Was Cruising For Sex

    2:26 PM PDT 4/2/2014 by Matt Patches

    To ground his extraterrestrial drama in reality, “Under the Skin” director Jonathan Glazer sent his starlet out on the streets of Scotland.

    Scarlett Johansson stars in Under the Skin as an alien invader struggling with identity. Her daily mission: seduce men off the streets, lure them back to home base, and drown them in a preservation fluid until their epidermis can be stripped and collected. On any other movie, casting agents would handpick camera-ready targets for Johansson to prey upon. But director Jonathan Glazer wanted to capture true temptation — an experience, not a performance.

    our editor recommends


    Under the Skin: Film Review


    Scarlett Johansson as Sex Predator in Terrifying ‘Under the Skin’ Trailer

    To pull it off, Glazer took a cue from Sacha Baron Cohen and the docu-comedy stylings of Borat. Johansson donned her costume, hit the streets, and through the magic of hidden cameras, selected victims as if she was a skin-hunting being from another planet. Anything could happen as long as the actress kept up the ruse.

    “You’re taking film to people, instead of bringing people to the film,” Glazer says in a new Under the Skin behind-the-scenes video. “It’s intoxicating.”

    Glazer and his team rigged an assortment of tiny cameras to capture Johansson expedition, hidden everywhere from the inside of her white van’s dashboard to the crevices of a local mall. Often, the production crew would shoot 30 minutes of unbroken takes with eight different cameras rolling at once. It was filmmaking as spycraft.

    “For me, it was absolutely thrilling. When we first started doing that covert stuff, you become incredibly self-conscious. All those things are life happening around this character,” Johansson says in the video.

    Watch the full feature below. Under the Skin opens in theaters April 4.

     

     

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    babypook
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    #150164

    Scarlett Johansson Scores Twice at Box Office as ‘Under the Skin’ Tops Limited Releases

    Movies | By on April 6, 2014 @ 12:51 pm Follow @toddcnnnghm           

     


    Scarlett Johansson Gets Undressed in ‘Under the Skin’ Trailer (Video)




    With “Captain America: Winter Soldier,” the actress has top-rated wide and specialty openers

    Scarlett Johansson pulled off an impressive double-play at the box office this weekend.

    While Disney’s Marvel superhero sequel “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” — in which she plays the Black Widow — was soaring to $96.2 million in its domestic debut, Johansson scored big at the specialty box office, too.


    The sci-fi movie “Under the Skin,” in which she plays a gorgeous but man-eating alien in Scotland, recorded the second-best limited debut of the year.

    The A24-distributed thriller took in $140,000 from two theaters in New York and two in L.A. That’s a $35,000 per-screen average, the highest of any specialty release this year, with the exception of “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” which averaged $202,792 in its four-theater March opening.


    “Under the Skin” is the first movie from director Jonathan Glazer (“Sexy Beast”) in a decade. Produced by James Wilson and Nick Wechsler, it was written by Glazer and Walter Campbell and is an adaptation of Michel Faber’s 2000 novel of the same name.

    “Under the Skin” built some momentum on the festival circuit, screening in Venice, Toronto and in Telluride, Colo. Its premiere last month in Los Angeles was the first screening in 25 years at the historic United Artists Theater at the downtown Ace Hotel.

    With “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” averaging roughly $23,000 from its 3,938 locations, Johansson’s movies had the two top per-screen averages in the marketplace.

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    babypook
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    #150165

    Jonathan Glazer on Struggles With Scarlett Johansson’s ‘Under the Skin’ and ‘Suspecting Everything You Do Is Bad’

    Movies | By on April 14, 2014 @ 10:25 am

    Getty Images                     

    Filmmaker tells TheWrap about his nine-year journey to adapt Michel Faber’s sci-fi thriller for the big screen

    Jonathan Glazer can now breathe easy — or as easy as a very serious British artist will allow himself, anyway.

    A few weeks ago, the British filmmaker was nervous about the release of his third feature, “Under the Skin,” and with good reason: It’s a challenging film that refuses to give easy answers, the sort of artistic work that can get ignored amid all the blockbusters now being released in theaters. And while any director will worry about box office returns and critical reception, Glazer had invested nearly a decade of his life of bringing Michel Faber’s book to the big screen, giving nine full years to creative dead ends and frustrations.

    “There are plenty of people who hate it, so it’s not some kind of consensus film,” Glazer told TheWrap earlier in April.

    Also read: ‘Under the Skin’ Review: A Is for ‘Alien’ and ‘Arthouse’ in This Oblique Scarlett Johansson Puzzler

    In the end, many more liked it than hated it, as “Under the Skin,” which features Scarlett Johansson as an alien of indeterminate origin who comes down to earth and picks up men before abstractly eating their souls and vitality, averaged $35,000 per screen in its opening weekend. It’s now up to $500,000 gross as it expands across April. It also received significant critical praise.

    Below is Glazer’s discussion with TheWrap, about the nine-year journey, his music video days and what’s next.

    This took you nine years to make, and it changed a lot, so what was your original vision or script for this like?
    Glazer: The original version was closer to the book, basically, much more specifically like the book. And I didn’t really want to film the book, I wanted to make a film of the book, and it just took quite a long time to kind of roll with that and find out what that needs to be and how to make it. In hindsight, I wish I could have done it sooner but it just took what it took, took a long time.

    Were there moments you thought you were there?
    Sometimes, but never really. There were moments that we got much closer to a version. But you’re not really ever there until you’ve actually finished the film. The writing continues through the filming and the music and the editing. We needed to get back to something very simple, a very simple starting point, which was this idea of an alien lens.

    Did you complicate it?
    Oh yeah. For sure. Things always become more complicated.

    See video: Scarlett Johansson Gets Undressed in ‘Under the Skin’ Trailer

    Then you brought it back to something simple. What was the height of its complication?
    It’s all theoretical now, it’s like it was never made. I would say a more elaborate, less focused … a very focused story, but not focused on her in the same way, and that was really the nub of it, was her.

    How long was Scarlett attached to it? At what point did she come on?
    We’ve been talking about it for a long time, but we didn’t commit to making it together until probably a year before we actually made it, nine months before we actually made it.

    What made you interested in her for the part? This is new territory for her …
    I hadn’t figured out yet how to cast the film, when we first met. It wasn’t until the story was much clearer, the methodology of filming became much clearer, that Scarlett came fully into focus. I think it needed to come fully into focus with her as well, and then it became a good sort of perfect storm of ingredients. She’s a terrific actress, she’s beautiful, there’s something very interesting about her in this role. She was in the right time in her life to do it, and she approached it with all that kind of energy and commitment. You sort of read that in an actor sometimes, when they’re ready for something.


    It’s a movie that has a very clear story, but it has things that are left abstract or unanswered. What were the things that you wanted to leave the audiences to interpret?
    Well, most of it. In a way, loads of things … I hope it’s a film that will live inside people, they’ll think about it and enjoy the puzzle and enjoy its mystery … It was really important that she remained an alien at the end of the film, and our understanding of her as an alien was as inscrutable at the ended as it was at the beginning. We’ve learned nothing about her as an alien, she’s learned something about us.

    I think the brain naturally sees a film and wants answers … there are answers, there’s actually a very rigorous logic, but I think the first time you see the film, it’s maybe not as evident, because there are a lot of other things to focus on and try and decode. I think it’s an emotional experience; I hope it is an experiential film.

    Do you have to fight yourself to not put in answers? Or do you have to force yourself to put in more?
    It really does depend, because sometimes the clearer something is, the more mysterious. Other times it feels like, you’re just looking for something you believe as you’re making it. The more expositional this film became, the less you felt it, the less I felt it. For instance, you needed to understand that they wanted us for something, (but) what that specific thing (was) didn’t need to be explained. Because actually the answer is less interesting than the question, so not knowing is terrifying and alien.


    When you go through this process, putting someone in a van and filming them as they meet people, as the time went on, did you see her change at all, how she approached people or the character?
    She got more confident. We all got more confident. When you start something new, you’re sort of tiptoeing around something, and then once you just let go, you’re just in it … that’s also when the performance starts to work wonderfully well, is when she’s not sort of looking at herself from the outside, conscious of her decisions or what she’s doing … she’s inside it. She got to that point, definitely. There was a few days of trying to calibrate, find that right entry point. You need to be around those ingredients to understand what it is.

    It must be quite the experience for the people she picked up.
    Absolutely. My God, I mean some of them were just on their way home. One of them was on the way to McDonald’s, getting something to eat, and then suddenly he’s in a scene in a film. I kind of think that suited what we were doing, it was all about bringing the film to the cast rather than the cast to the film.

    It’s interesting that humans are so trusting.
    Some people are. There were people who were very suspicious and read some weirdness going on. The other thing is people say, “Who wouldn’t get in the van? Show me where’s the van, I’ll get in …” The reality is very different to that. You get a few guys who are very kind of cocksure and confident. Others are questioning and suspicious, you see everything. You see a variety of responses.

    Speaking of responses, did you know how iconic the Jamiroquai video would be when you made it?
    No, when I made that video, I actually finished it and I remember saying to my producer at the time, ‘You’ve got to come save this video because it’s a fucking disaster.’ And when he was showing the Sony record company, I took myself out of the room and said, ‘I can’t watch it.’ He asked why not and I said, they’re going to ask for their money back, and I can’t because we spent it, I don’t know what to do. It’s going to be a disaster.’

    But of course, everyone loved it.
    You don’t know while you’re doing things, you suspect everything you do is bad.

    Do you expect that when you make movies?
    Yeah, yeah.

    How about “Sexy Beast,” did you think that when you made that?
    Yup.

    And “Under the Skin,” did you expect hatred?
    You just don’t know. You do what you think is right and it’s frightening, putting something out there and not knowing what people think. There are plenty of people who hate it, so it’s not some kind of consensus film. You just hope that people can get something from it and maybe it sparks something for them.

    Now that you’ve transitioned to films, do you think the golden age of music videos is over? Are they going by the wayside?
    It seems like things are going all right. It’s just moved to a different place. I think it’s still a very relevant art form, it’s easy to dismiss it and say nothing is happening. The thing that is gone from it is the budgets, but I think people are more resourceful now, with new technology. But some ideas require money to really pull off, and those ideas have fallen by the wayside. It’s too soon to say that it’s gone, these things come in cycles.

    It took nine years to get this right; now that you’re free, what’s next?
    Well I have a few ideas for things I’m writing. I need to get this behind me before I can fully commit to the next project.

    Do you want to step away from cinema?
    Maybe, it’s hard to say. Some new opportunities have come my way lately in areas I haven’t worked in before. I’m stroking my chin on those. I want to do something that is not playing those same kind of rules. We are conditioned to watching films in a certain way, (most) films we watch do come from theater and traditional story and dialogue and character. This film only really seemed to make sense if it stood completely apart, because it takes her perspective, and none of us really knew how that would be received. So it’s really exciting, the reception, I would say is a pleasant surprise.

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    babypook
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    #150166

    LUCY

    July 17, 2014 | 4:27 PM
     
    Universal’s Luc Besson thriller looks like a sleeper hit and is tracking for a $40 million opening on July 25
    Full story at TheWrap
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    BrokenFan
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    #150167

    Literally just finished watching Under the Skin. 

    Silent, creepy, and moody. One of the year’s best.  

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    KyleBailey
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    #150168

    I watched Under the Skin this week. It was weird but in a good way but it’s definitly for more of the artsy crowd 

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