Standing Ovations At the Oscars

Home // Forums // Movies // Standing Ovations At the Oscars

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
Created
2 years ago
Last Reply
2 years ago
13
replies
961
views
7
users
3
3
2
  • Tony Ruiz
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 5th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #199758

    So this has been on my mind…I’m curious to see if anyone else feels the way I do?

    Standing ovations are becoming such a regular event at the
    Oscars that the show is beginning to look less like an awards ceremony and more
    like a State of the Union Address. 

    Standing ovations for winners used to be a rare occasion at
    the Oscars—reserved only for that really popular winner, or for the deserving
    veteran finally getting his or her due. 
    When Art Carney won his unexpected Best Actor trophy for Harry and Tonto in 1974, it was the
    first standing ovation for a winner in any of the acting categories.  But that phenomenon wouldn’t happen again in
    that category until fourteen years later, when Dustin Hoffman won his second
    Best Actor trophy for Rain Man.  Since that win in 1988, 16 out of 26 winners
    in the Best Actor category have received standing ovations.

    The first standing ovation for a Best Actress winner didn’t happen
    until 1985, when the legendary Geraldine Page won her first Oscar for The Trip to Bountiful.  Since then only eleven women have had the
    same reception, but six of those have occurred only within the last seven
    years.

    1985 was also the first standing ovation for a Best
    Supporting Actor winner, when Don Ameche won (inexplicably) for Cocoon. 
    To date, only five other actors have received the same ovation, the most
    recent being Christopher Plummer for Beginners
    in 2011.

    All of the standing ovations in the Best Supporting Actress
    category have occurred in the last six years, the very first being Mo’nique’s
    win for Precious.  Joining her on the short list is Octavia
    Spencer(The Help), Lupita N’yongo (12 Years a Slave), and Patricia Arquette
    (Boyhood).

    Are all of these ovations deserving? Who can say? When you
    look at the list of those winners that NEVER received a standing ovation-Jack
    Nicholson, Ingrid Bergman, George Burns, Humphrey Bogart, John Wayne—and then
    look at the names of those who have…well you be the judge.

    But while some may debate the merit of some these ovations,
    there is no denying that it is becoming a more frequent phenomenon.   In the last seven Oscar ceremonies, three of
    the four acting winners received a standing ovation.  And this doesn’t include ovations for Best
    Picture winners, directors (Ang Lee, Steven Spielberg, Kathryn Bigelow) and
    even screenwriters (Spike Jones).

    Perhaps this is just part of our culture.  Everyone gets a standing ovation now.  Everyone gets a participation ribbon.  But if standing ovations are supposed to be
    special, AND they happen all the time, are they really that special?

    Reply
    Tony Ruiz
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 5th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #199760

    So when would be too early to predict who is going to get one…

    My assumption, if these winners were to happen:

    Dicaprio for sure.
    If Ridley Scott wins, he gets one.
    If Stallone wins, he gets one.

    I can’t imagine any of the other acting winners getting one. 

    ReplyCopy URL
    ENGLAND
    Participant
    Joined:
    Oct 5th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #199761

    They are so common now days, I can see Brie Larson gettingone WHEN she wins the Oscar.

    ReplyCopy URL
    tennisfreak
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jan 18th, 2013
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #199762

    Bear in mind the ceremony used to be shorter. I think people just want to stretch a bit in a ceremony that runs to 3 1/2 to four hours.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Anonymous
    Joined:
    Jan 1st, 1970
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #199763

    So this has been on my mind…I’m curious to see if anyone else feels the way I do?

    Standing ovations are becoming such a regular event at the
    Oscars that the show is beginning to look less like an awards ceremony and more
    like a State of the Union Address. 

    Standing ovations for winners used to be a rare occasion at
    the Oscars—reserved only for that really popular winner, or for the deserving
    veteran finally getting his or her due. 
    When Art Carney won his unexpected Best Actor trophy for Harry and Tonto in 1974, it was the
    first standing ovation for a winner in any of the acting categories.  But that phenomenon wouldn’t happen again in
    that category until fourteen years later, when Dustin Hoffman won his second
    Best Actor trophy for Rain Man.  Since that win in 1988, 16 out of 26 winners
    in the Best Actor category have received standing ovations.

    The first standing ovation for a Best Actress winner didn’t happen
    until 1985, when the legendary Geraldine Page won her first Oscar for The Trip to Bountiful.  Since then only eleven women have had the
    same reception, but six of those have occurred only within the last seven
    years.

    1985 was also the first standing ovation for a Best
    Supporting Actor winner, when Don Ameche won (inexplicably) for Cocoon. 
    To date, only five other actors have received the same ovation, the most
    recent being Christopher Plummer for Beginners
    in 2011.

    All of the standing ovations in the Best Supporting Actress
    category have occurred in the last six years, the very first being Mo’nique’s
    win for Precious.  Joining her on the short list is Octavia
    Spencer(The Help), Lupita N’yongo (12 Years a Slave), and Patricia Arquette
    (Boyhood).

    Are all of these ovations deserving? Who can say? When you
    look at the list of those winners that NEVER received a standing ovation-Jack
    Nicholson, Ingrid Bergman, George Burns, Humphrey Bogart, John Wayne—and then
    look at the names of those who have…well you be the judge.

    But while some may debate the merit of some these ovations,
    there is no denying that it is becoming a more frequent phenomenon.   In the last seven Oscar ceremonies, three of
    the four acting winners received a standing ovation.  And this doesn’t include ovations for Best
    Picture winners, directors (Ang Lee, Steven Spielberg, Kathryn Bigelow) and
    even screenwriters (Spike Jones).

    Perhaps this is just part of our culture.  Everyone gets a standing ovation now.  Everyone gets a participation ribbon.  But if standing ovations are supposed to be
    special, AND they happen all the time, are they really that special?

    She didn’t get one.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Tony Ruiz
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 5th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #199764

    Watch the tape…yes she did.  It wasn’t sustained.  But she did get one.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Anonymous
    Joined:
    Jan 1st, 1970
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #199765

    Nope she did not. The Boyhood crew was cheering for her but that’s it. Now, Julianne Moore and Eddie Redmayne both got one. JK Simmons 50-50%, and Arquette had only her team.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Monty
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jan 21st, 2015
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #199766

    Bear in mind the ceremony used to be shorter. I think people just want to stretch a bit in a ceremony that runs to 3 1/2 to four hours.

    I agree they just want to stretch only. In all the previous 3 years, winners for Best Supporting Actor didn’t get standing ovation while other acting winners got one (with the exception of Anne Hathaway as people simply didn’t want to give her one). It is not because they were less Oscar worthy than the other 3 (J K Simmons is the most deserving acting winner of last year based on the performance alone) but  because Best Supporting Actor is presented at the beginning, so there is no need for them to stretch.

    Those who didn’t got standing ovation in last 3 years
    2015 J K Simmons
    2014 Jared Leto
    2013 Christoph Waltz, Anne Hathaway 

    ReplyCopy URL
    Tony Ruiz
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 5th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #199767

    Sorry Vinclette, not entitled to your own facts.  The majority of the audience is standing.  Watch the video from 1:50-1:56.  The entire audience, with a few exceptions is standing.  

    The interesting thing is that Simmons got a really sustained ovation, but only a few stood.  Redmayne got one because the win was very popular.  Moore got one because she’s Moore.  Arquette’s confuses me.  But hey, good on her for getting one. 

    ReplyCopy URL
    Monty
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jan 21st, 2015
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #199768

    Sorry Vinclette, not entitled to your own facts.  The majority of the audience is standing.  Watch the video from 1:50-1:56.  The entire audience, with a few exceptions is standing.  

    The interesting thing is that Simmons got a really sustained ovation, but only a few stood.  Redmayne got one because the win was very popular.  Moore got one because she’s Moore.  Arquette’s confuses me.  But hey, good on her for getting one. 

    The fact that Redmayne got a more sustained and louder standing ovation than Moore and Nyong’o got a louder cheering than Blanchett really pissed me off. Moore and Blanchett were so long overdue of an leading actress Oscar while Redmayne and Nyong’o are newcomers who are at their early 30s.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Rooney Moore
    Participant
    Joined:
    Aug 2nd, 2014
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #199769

    Arquette got a decent standing ovation. Since when Meryl Streep, Julianne Moore, David Oyelowo, Eddie Redmayne and Ben. Cumberbatch were on Boyhood team? 
    But shame on Stone and Knightley for not care enough to stood up. Even if the Countess Streep were cheering for her rival, you had no excuse! Lol.
    Stone didn’t even stand up after Arquette came and hugged her. Ugh. 

    ReplyCopy URL
    tennisfreak
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jan 18th, 2013
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #199770

    [quote=”tennisfreak”]

    Bear in mind the ceremony used to be shorter. I think people just want to stretch a bit in a ceremony that runs to 3 1/2 to four hours.

    I agree they just want to stretch only. In all the previous 3 years, winners for Best Supporting Actor didn’t get standing ovation while other acting winners got one (with the exception of Anne Hathaway as people simply didn’t want to give her one). It is not because they were less Oscar worthy than the other 3 (J K Simmons is the most deserving acting winner of last year based on the performance alone) but  because Best Supporting Actor is presented at the beginning, so there is no need for them to stretch.

    Those who didn’t got standing ovation in last 3 years
    2015 J K Simmons
    2014 Jared Leto
    2013 Christoph Waltz, Anne Hathaway 
    [/quote]

    I mean it can’t possibly be a coincidence that the ceremony started hitting 3 hours in 1973 and ovations for some acting winners started thereafter? Also presenters would get standing O’s like Katherine Hepburn for the 1973 awards. So did Audrey Hepburn and Bette Davis in the 1986 awards. So sometimes the need to stretch comes when the actors win, sometimes it’s when a legend presents. Probably as simple as that.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Anonymous
    Joined:
    Jan 1st, 1970
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #199771

    [quote=”OperaJunky”]

    Sorry Vinclette, not entitled to your own facts.  The majority of the audience is standing.  Watch the video from 1:50-1:56.  The entire audience, with a few exceptions is standing.  

    The interesting thing is that Simmons got a really sustained ovation, but only a few stood.  Redmayne got one because the win was very popular.  Moore got one because she’s Moore.  Arquette’s confuses me.  But hey, good on her for getting one. 

    The fact that Redmayne got a more sustained and louder standing ovation than Moore and Nyong’o got a louder cheering than Blanchett really pissed me off. Moore and Blanchett were so long overdue of an leading actress Oscar while Redmayne and Nyong’o are newcomers who are at their early 30s.
    [/quote]

    How is Eddie Redmayne a newcomer? He was maybe…in 2007 with “Savage Grace”… Also in his case it was the performance which got the standing ovation.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Amanda Spears
    Moderator
    Joined:
    Jul 26th, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #199772

    I usually don’t care for the ovation when they announce the winner to me the more important ovation is after their acceptance speech. They stood when Brody won for “The Pianist ” but they gave him an ovation for his speech! This year I see three possible; Stallone, Scott, and DiCaprio.

    ReplyCopy URL
Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
Reply To: Standing Ovations At the Oscars

You can use BBCodes to format your content.
Your account can't use Advanced BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.

Similar Topics
SayMyName - Aug 21, 2017
Movies
SN - Aug 20, 2017
Movies