Home Forums Movies The LA Times backs PaulHanlinJr and demands more nominees with BO pull

The LA Times backs PaulHanlinJr and demands more nominees with BO pull

CREATE A NEW TOPIC
CREATE A NEW POLL
Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
Created
5 years ago
Last Reply
5 years ago
13
replies
603
views
11
users
2
2
1
  • mcsoto
    Member
    Joined:
    Dec 3rd, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    Junk
    Member
    Joined:
    Jul 2nd, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #92996

    6 of the 9 BP nominees this year have passed 100 million domestic. So the point that they always nominate movies nobody has seen is moot. But I agree about Les Mis. I would not mind a bit Skyfall or TDKR or The Avengers taking its place. Also agree about Harry Potter last year, that SHOULD have been nominated.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Gabriel
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jul 10th, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #92997

    I couldn’t careless if a film grosses 1 million at the box office, or 1 billion. Just nominate the the best films.

    ReplyCopy URL
    JulieF
    Participant
    Joined:
    Oct 14th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #92998

    I rolled my eyes at this, especially the way the title’s worded.  Like Junk said, many of the Best Picture nominees are already over 100 million and huge box office hits.  That’s especially true for Life of Pi and Lincoln.

    This isn’t the People’s Choice awards.  I don’t want it to turn out like the Critics’ Choice awards where you have all the good awards interspersed with crap like “best cast, Twilight.”  That was just embarrassing.   I liked Skyfall and feel like it’d be a decent choice for the tenth best picture nomination, but Avengers was just boring.

    I doubt the younger people are going to tune in for the Oscars whether those movies are nominated or not. 

    ReplyCopy URL
    Guest2014
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 15th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #92999

    I heart you, Mary McNamara.

    McNamara made it a point to list only those films that hit it big at the boxoffice AND were critical successes as well.  It’s as if she was in my brain, picking at it. 🙂  That’s why Twilight Breaking Dawn got what it deserved – 7 Razzies. Because it didn’t tick off both boxes the way Skyfall and my big three did. 

    ReplyCopy URL
    babypook
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 4th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #93000

    I heart you, Mary McNamara.

    McNamara made it a point to list only those films that hit it big at the boxoffice AND were critical successes as well.  It’s as if she was in my brain, picking at it. 🙂  That’s why Twilight Breaking Dawn got what it deserved – 7 Razzies. Because it didn’t tick off both boxes the way Skyfall and my big three did. 

    By some calculation, Beasts of the Southern Wild is actually the film that made the most money in comparison to it’s budget. How do you feel about that? Lol.  

    ReplyCopy URL
    Daniel Montgomery
    Participant
    Joined:
    May 14th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #93001

    I hate, hate, hate this kind of false populism. This victim mentality people take on behalf of billion-dollar behemoths when they claim popular movies don’t win Oscars.

    It’s really more a reflection of how the line of “mainstream” has moved in Hollywood. Last year people were complaining about how obscure the Oscars were because “The Artist” won, despite the fact that most of the nominees, “The Artist” included, were moderate mainstream hits.

    This year it’s even more ridiculous to complain about popular films getting snubbed, just because “The Hunger Games” and “The Avengers” got snubbed in favor of movies that mostly made $100 million or more domestically. Are we supposed to believe that “Argo,” “Life of Pi,” “Lincoln,” and “Les Mis” are somehow too arthouse? Or that the Best Picture lineup would be better if “Hunger Games” and “The Avengers” replaced “Amour” and “Beasts of the Southern Wild”?

    While a reasonable case can be made that “Skyfall” should have been nominated (you could make just as good a case for a much smaller movie like “Moonrise Kingdom”), the idea that success is somehow stigmatized at the Oscars is preposterous. The winners are not always blockbusters, but they’re almost always hits, and even the ones with modest grosses were successful when considered against their production budgets (“Crash,” “The Artist”). Really, “The Hurt Locker” is the only example of a Best Picture that underperformed financially. And ever since it won people have loved to complain that popular movies can’t win, even when that’s demonstrably untrue.

    ReplyCopy URL
    babypook
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 4th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #93002

    Lol Daniel. Love your rant. Feel better now?  (btw, I agree)

    ReplyCopy URL
    pacinofan
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 28th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #93003

    I agree with all the things Julie F, Junk, Gabriel and Daniel M. have said here.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Andrew Eng
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 3rd, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #93004

    I hate, hate, hate this kind of false populism. This victim mentality people take on behalf of billion-dollar behemoths when they claim popular movies don’t win Oscars.

    It’s really more a reflection of how the line of “mainstream” has moved in Hollywood. Last year people were complaining about how obscure the Oscars were because “The Artist” won, despite the fact that most of the nominees, “The Artist” included, were moderate mainstream hits.

    This year it’s even more ridiculous to complain about popular films getting snubbed, just because “The Hunger Games” and “The Avengers” got snubbed in favor of movies that mostly made $100 million or more domestically. Are we supposed to believe that “Argo,” “Life of Pi,” “Lincoln,” and “Les Mis” are somehow too arthouse? Or that the Best Picture lineup would be better if “Hunger Games” and “The Avengers” replaced “Amour” and “Beasts of the Southern Wild”?

    While a reasonable case can be made that “Skyfall” should have been nominated (you could make just as good a case for a much smaller movie like “Moonrise Kingdom”), the idea that success is somehow stigmatized at the Oscars is preposterous. The winners are not always blockbusters, but they’re almost always hits, and even the ones with modest grosses were successful when considered against their production budgets (“Crash,” “The Artist”). Really, “The Hurt Locker” is the only example of a Best Picture that underperformed financially. And ever since it won people have loved to complain that popular movies can’t win, even when that’s demonstrably untrue.

    This x1000 🙂 

    ReplyCopy URL
    DamianWayne
    Member
    Joined:
    Sep 12th, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #93005

    Oh, this argument again. zzzzzz.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Daniel Montgomery
    Participant
    Joined:
    May 14th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #93006

    Lol Daniel. Love your rant. Feel better now?  (btw, I agree)

    Yes, much.  

    ReplyCopy URL
    KennerLeaguer
    Participant
    Joined:
    Dec 26th, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #93007

    I rolled my eyes at this, especially the way the title’s worded.  Like Junk said, many of the Best Picture nominees are already over 100 million and huge box office hits.  That’s especially true for Life of Pi and Lincoln.

    This isn’t the People’s Choice awards.  I don’t want it to turn out like the Critics’ Choice awards where you have all the good awards interspersed with crap like “best cast, Twilight.”  That was just embarrassing.   I liked Skyfall and feel like it’d be a decent choice for the tenth best picture nomination, but Avengers was just boring.

    I doubt the younger people are going to tune in for the Oscars whether those movies are nominated or not. 

    I don’t think Life of Pi cracked $100 million in the USA (came close) but it made a KILLING overseas.

    Silver Linings, Argo, Lincoln, Les Mis and Django did make well over a million in the USA (well….Silver Linings may be on its way to doing so). Django and Les Mis are also big hits overseass too. I think they have more than enough representation of successful films in this year’s Oscars.

    ReplyCopy URL
    outsider
    Member
    Joined:
    Jan 24th, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #93008

    “Life of Pi” is over $113 million in the US.

    ReplyCopy URL
Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Similar Topics
spencer - Nov 22, 2017
Movies
RobertPius - Nov 22, 2017
Movies