Home Forums Movies TWC's WILD OATS (MacLaine & Lange) grosses $187,000 in 100 theaters over weekend

TWC's WILD OATS (MacLaine & Lange) grosses $187,000 in 100 theaters over weekend

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  • Anonymous
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    Jan 1st, 1970
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    #1201882834

    The trailer for this film has finally been released in the UK. The film opens 9/16/16 there. Not sure if US opening will be the same.

    WILD OATS Trailer

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    Anonymous
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    #1201882862

    Oh my God it looks SOOOO fun. I am glad it is finally being released, if the movie is as good as the trailer Lange should at least get another Golden Globe.

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    Andrew Carden
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    #1201882873

    Ha! That does look fun. I don’t see why this couldn’t garner a Hello, My Name Is Doris/The Meddler-level theatrical release.

    OSCAR FLASHBACK: Best Original Song (1987) – The Year We Had the Times of Our Lives

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    Anonymous
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    #1201882890

    Ha! That does look fun. I don’t see why this couldn’t garner a Hello, My Name Is Doris/The Meddler-level theatrical release.

    The rumor is that it is getting a limited run. I think it looks great, and Lange and MacLaine have sparkling chemistry.

    Lange surprised me the most, just going broke for laughs and doing fantastic at it.

    I could see Lange garnering a Supporting Oscar nod for this if the reviews are good and box-office decent.

    Her character apparently has a few intense emotional scenes.

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    Anonymous
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    #1201882935

    I found a trailer of same quality on YouTube.

    These gifs are definitely better quality, though. Lange has me gagging.

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    Anonymous
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    #1201883036

    Much better quality trailer.

    WILD OATS trailer

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    Mihael Crncec
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    #1201883038

    I haven’t seen a comedy trailer this good, or any trailer for that matter, in a really long time. It looks so fabulous – especially Lange. I didn’t know she could be this hilarious. Shall speculations about another potential Oscar nomination begin? I think she’s a shoo-in for the Globes. I can’t wait to see this movie.

    Gold Derby TV Awards FYC: Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life - Limited Series, Movie/Mini Actress (Lauren Graham), Movie/Mini Supp. Actress (Kelly Bishop)

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    Anonymous
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    #1201883048

    I haven’t seen a comedy trailer this good, or any trailer for that matter, in a really long time. It looks so fabulous – especially Lange. I didn’t know she could be this hilarious. Shall speculations about another potential Oscar nomination begin? I think she’s a shoo-in for the Globes. I can’t wait to see this movie.

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    M
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    #1201883051

    I agree Lange is the comedic highlight of the trailer. Who knew she could be that funny?

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    Anonymous
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    #1201904799

    Update:

    Looks like TWC is in fact eyeing a “Limited Release” (per Rentrak). According to the film’s official Facebook page (/wildoatsmovie), it will be released on 9/16/16.

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    M
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    #1201904879

    For certain Lange will receive at least a 7th Oscar nod soon.

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    Anonymous
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    #1201904946

    For certain Lange will receive at least a 7th Oscar nod soon.

    From your lips to Oscar’s ears 😉

    If not for this, then it most certainly will happen for Gia Coppola’s “The Lonely Doll”. That part, along with Watts’, is massive. I think Watts has a good shot at finally winning an Oscar for this and Lange, in addition to nabbing a nod, might actually win, too.

    ::fingers crossed::

    Also, if you’re interested, IMDb has the cutest picture of Lange in “Wild Oats”. It was just uploaded a day or two ago. For some reason I can’t post it.

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    Anonymous
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    #1201904947

    For those interested in some “behind the scenes” info on this movie, here are some great excerpts from Shirley MacLaine’s memoire, “Above the Line”, which partly covers this film’s production:

    I don’t have any idea what happened with Jessica that particular day. What concerned me was what effect the disruption would have on Jessica’s performance. We had a dramatic scene to play in the hot sun, a scene in which she was supposed to cry. We absolutely had to get the scene within the hour or we would fall behind and there was no money to cover a reshoot. Jessica pulled herself together. Andy yelled, “Action.” Without a moment to prepare and with a jittery crew looking on, Jessica was brilliant in the scene and cried exactly on cue. I couldn’t believe it. “Cut!” I said, “Jessica, you are good, good, good. How did you do that?” “I guess I have a well of sorrow in my life,” she answered with a little smile. I thought of Misha Baryshnikov and Sam Shepard, but I didn’t ask one single question. I knew I was in the presence of a great actor.

    My original costar was Jacki Weaver. Because Jacki finally took work on a television series and had to withdraw, over the next five years we at various times welcomed to the cast Kathy Bates, Jane Fonda, Bette Midler, and finally Jessica Lange. That’s just one part of what went on during the five years it took to get ready to shoot. Thanks to amateur decisions, stupid contracts, and scattered decision making, five hundred thousand dollars had been spent even before we landed in the Canary Islands. I came across the world with Jessica. I had never met her, but when I called her, concerned about the state of the production, her words echoed in my ears: “Even if the money isn’t there and we don’t make the movie, they’re paying for my trip to have mojitos on the beach in the Canary Islands.” That made sense to me, and besides, she liked the script. Neither of us knew who was cast with us. I gave up trying to keep track. At various times, there had been Alan Arkin, Jim Brolin, Donald Sutherland, Frank Langella, Brian Dennehy, Jon Voight, Kelsey Grammer, John Lithgow, and Christopher Walken.

    Jessica’s schedule was a problem be because she had to complete her work on our picture so she could report to American Horror Story in New Orleans on a specific and unmovable date. It was in her contract. So the morning after we arrived, she shot her first scene. It was a comic love scene with a young man her character had picked up in a restaurant. It involved shoving him up against the wall and jumping on him because her husband had left her and she was free to do all the outrageous things she had repressed until then. I heard she was funny and abandoned and the scene worked. I was in my room trying to sleep. Off set, Jessica was sweet, a pro, not social, beautiful, intense, and a brilliant dramatic actress. I liked her a lot and assured her she would be funny. We had many conversations about the men in our lives, which will certainly not be shared here.

    Andy called for Jessica, Demi, and me to join him on the patio. He outlined what the money situation was. He was open and specific. He told us that he was going to defer and asked if we would too. He said, “The footage is wonderful. Jessica is funnier than she thinks she is, and you, Shirley, are a machine.” What does that mean? I wondered. Was I a machine because I was always on time, knew my lines, and could act? Did that make me a machine? I understood that my work ethic was reliable, but how was my performance? I just knew Jose Luis was photographing me to look forty and I was worried. The roles for me now were definitely older women. That’s where the work was. I actually hoped I didn’t look too good. Jessica and Demi and I carried on the conversation when Andy left us. About ten of the below-the-line people (crew, production, etc.) had deferred part of their salaries. Now was the time for above-the-line (actors, directors, writers) to step up to the plate. Jessica and Demi said, “Let’s call our manager.” (They had the same one.) I didn’t have a manager. I had an agent who knew the business better than anyone and was going to order a Sicilian hit on whomever he could round up. He had specifically said to me, “Do not defer before talking to me.” Now he couldn’t get anyone on the phone. Production people didn’t just fall off the turnip truck either. That’s why they didn’t accept his calls. There had been divisive scenes in the production office. The Americans couldn’t get along or understand the Spanish way of working. The Spanish felt that Nick, the AD, yelled too much at the crew. But we all knew that an AD has to be a mixture of Hitler and Gandhi. The Spanish had a different sense of time”more laissez-faire, more concerned with manners and polite politeness. The American way of working was get the job done in as little time as possible because time is money. There had also been arguments as to who was in charge of what. I saw in action how matriarchal the Spanish pecking order was. The men might be macho strutters, but it was the women in charge of an aspect of production who snapped the decision-making whip. A woman headed up the Spanish production company, which provided all the equipment, cameras, and gear, and everything else that the below-the-line crew needed. Apparently, she had also put four hundred thousand toward the budget. The American way of working would have to defer to the Spanish way. I laughed to myself. Deferment seemed to be something the Americans were going to have to get used to in order to get the movie made. Jessica and Demi’s manager didn’t spend much time on the phone with them. “If that’s what you want to do, go for it,” he said. They were willing. So now it was up to me. What bothered me, even in my state of liberal, bleeding-heart flexibility, was that we would be the last to get paid, after all the other investors were paid off (assuming the picture made any money at all). We three would actually be investors, but with a third or fourth position of recoupment. That could really mean we would have worked for nothing, or close to it. Was that fair? I told Jessica and Demi that I thought we should defer half our salaries, but I wanted to get a specific recommendation from my agent. And my agent wasn’t on vacation. So we broke up the meeting and scattered before the horrible band started their first set.

    We were coming to the end of our Wild Oats adventure, which to me had been about venturing into the distant prehistory of humankind and our cosmic neighbors. So there we were, shooting the last scene. It was a funeral scene because my husband had died. Jessica, sitting by me, began to cry. It was my husband who died! It escalated into a full-blown, no-holds-barred, total nervous breakdown performance. She was Blanche DuBois on crack. Brilliant. What did I do? I played straight man to her comedy supernova— the same comedy that she didn’t think she could do. She then said to Andy, “I want more footage!” I was flabbergasted. She writhed around in Hollywood parody, claiming there had not been enough cameras on her and we should spend the time doing it over and over again. Was she really crying? Acting is a mystery even to those of us who are good at it. Life was show business, and Jessica was eating up the scenery with her last scene on purpose. Bravo.

    Lange pulling the diva and MacLaine cheering her is priceless.

    MacLaine would go on to present Lange with the “L’Oreal de Paris Legend Award” months later.

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    Boidiva02
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    #1201905784

    According to IMDB it is airing on Lifetime on August 22nd, could this be accurate that this movie will debut on TV instead of in theaters?

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    clay bryce
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    #1201911318

    Yes it is.

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