Home Forums Movies This is not what it is supposed to be named in your language

This is not what it is supposed to be named in your language

CREATE A NEW TOPIC
CREATE A NEW POLL
Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
Created
6 years ago
Last Reply
6 years ago
12
replies
4287
views
7
users
5
2
1
  • Jose Manuel Garcia
    Participant
    Joined:
    May 16th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #50072

    First apologize for the name of the topic… It might be quite confusing. But i think the idea of what is about, it will be clear.

    This topic came to my mind, discussing “Bringing up Baby” in the general forum. The spanish translation was “La fiera de mi niña” who could be understand either like “my girl´s animal” refering to the leopard or like “my wild girl” talking about Kate´s character.

    Many times, (most common before than now), when an foreign movie arrived to  my country, the movie title was given a spanish name.

    Sometimes just a translation

    Un Americano en paris (An american in paris)
    Una habitación con vistas (A room with a view)

    Other times, just making a little changes
    Lo que el viento se llevo (What wind took with it) – Gone with the wind

    Sometimes, just playing with the name of film
    Tia y Mama (Aunt and mom) – Auntie Mame

    And other times, just refering to what the film was about
    Tiburón (Shark) – JAWS

    Here are some of my favorite spanish title for some american movies

    Con la muerte en los talones (Death on my heels)
    Sonrisas y Lágrimas (Cheers and Tears)
    La legión invencible (The invincible legion)
    De entre los muertos (Among the deaths)
    Con Faldas y a lo loco (Wearing skirts and acting crazy)

    Of course, we have some spanish movies that had their own translation

    Atamé – “Tip me up, Tip me down”  (A great choice, in my opinión due to double meaning that “Atame” can have)
    El laberinto del Fauno – Pans labyrinth (Faun´s Labyrinth)

    So what do you think? Films should keep their real names? or should be translated to the language of the viewer or just adapted…

    Sometimes when they rename it, they give so much informatión about what is going on…

    And by the way, what are your favorite “title Movie names” 

    Reply
    blueprint
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jul 13th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #50074

    I’d say translating as close as possible to the original title is the way to go. Not every person is able to understand English, so always keeping the original title is not possible. Changing some words or the syntax in order to make it sound better is often inevitable so I’m fine with that as well. But completely renaming should be avoided.
    For example, in Germany “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind” is simply called “Vergiss mein nicht!” (Forget me not!). Instead of translating the Alexander Pope quote, they just used an ordinary, dull wordplay and this really downgrades it a lot I find.
    Sometimes foreign films are even renamed in English. “Mean Girls” is called “Girls Club” and “Horrible Bosses” “Kill the Boss”. That I’ll probably never understand. Why is the English title simplified and not translated if they think the general German public is not able to understand the meaning.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Jake
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jul 2nd, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #50075

    In Poland “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind” was called “Zakochany bez pamiÄ™ci” which literally means “In Love without a Memory” (about a man) although in Polish when you say that someone loves someone else “without a memory” it means that this love is very big. This way I think it was effective translation, although regarding the film’s plot and not the original title. There are usually problems with titles used from poems or paintings. Another case was with “Girl, Interrupted”, translated as “Przerwana lekcja muzyki” – “Stopped Music Lesson”. 

    There were, however, less successful translations. My recent least favorite is “The Blind Side” translated as “Wielki Mike” which means… “Big Mike”. I don’t know if this translation is uglier than the whole film but it’s pretty close. 

    Among classics there are:

    “Die Hard” as “Szklana puÅ‚apka” – “Trap Made of Glass” which worked for the first time but not so much for the sequels when plot didn’t have anything to do with the glass.  

    “Terminator” as “Elektroniczny morderca” – “Electronic Murderer”. Enough said that noone ever uses that title. Some titles were never translated, like “Bodyguard” or “Fighter” (without “the”) and this should be another case like that.

    “Hangover” as “Kac Vegas” which is a game of words as “kac” means “hangover”, and then plus Las Vegas. It was even kinda clever as the movie took place in Las Vegas. It literally means “Hangover Vegas” but as words hangover in Polish and “Las” of Las Vegas sound similar, it works. However, the sequel was named… “Kac Vegas w Bangkoku” which means “Hangover Vegas in Bangkok”!

    There are always some examples of the titles which would have worked pretty fine without any changes but they were made anyway. Jerry Zucker’s “Ghost” as “Uwierz w ducha” – “Believe in Ghost” or “Brokeback Mountain” as “Tajemnica Brokeback Mountain” – “Brokeback Mountain’s Mystery”. This still kinda works but I find it useless for any other than promotional reason.

    More to come! 😀

    You should create the same topic in the Emmy section, regarding TV shows (I would to that myself but I don’t want to steal your idea). 
     

    ReplyCopy URL
    Chatan
    Participant
    Joined:
    May 15th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #50076

    Quiero matar a mi jefe (I want to kill my boss) = horrible bosses

    Año nuevo: New Year day: New year Eve.

    El Laberinto (The labirynth)= Rabitt hole

    Inocencia interrumpida (Innocence interrupted): girl, Interrupted

    Inocencia perdida (Lost innocence)= Broke down palace

    Milagros inesperados (unexpected miracles) = The green mile.

    Secretos en la montaña (Secrets on the mountain)= brokeback mountain

    Vidas cruzadas (crossing lifes)= crash

    Una pareja explosiva (an explsove couple/pair) = rush hour

    ReplyCopy URL
    Jose Manuel Garcia
    Participant
    Joined:
    May 16th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #50077

    The spanish title was “Olvidate de mi” (Forget me)

    I think that is really funny. Same movie, totally different translation for the movie tittle.
     

    ReplyCopy URL
    Jose Manuel Garcia
    Participant
    Joined:
    May 16th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #50078

    In Poland “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind” was called “Zakochany bez pamiÄ™ci” which literally means “In Love without a Memory” (about a man) although in Polish when you say that someone loves someone else “without a memory” it means that this love is very big. This way I think it was effective translation, although regarding the film’s plot and not the original title. There are usually problems with titles used from poems or paintings. Another case was with “Girl, Interrupted”, translated as “Przerwana lekcja muzyki” – “Stopped Music Lesson”. 

    There were, however, less successful translations. My recent least favorite is “The Blind Side” translated as “Wielki Mike” which means… “Big Mike”. I don’t know if this translation is uglier than the whole film but it’s pretty close. 

    Among classics there are:

    “Die Hard” as “Szklana puÅ‚apka” – “Trap Made of Glass” which worked for the first time but not so much for the sequels when plot didn’t have anything to do with the glass.  

    “Terminator” as “Elektroniczny morderca” – “Electronic Murder”. Enough said that noone ever uses that title. Some titles were never translated, like “Bodyguard” or “Fighter” (without “the”) and this should be another case like that.

    “Hangover” as “Kac Vegas” which is a game of words as “kac” means “hangover”, and then plus Las Vegas. It was even kinda clever as the movie took place in Las Vegas. It literally means “Hangover Vegas” but as words hangover in Polish and “Las” of Las Vegas sound similar, it works. However, the sequel was named… “Kac Vegas w Bangkoku” which means “Hangover Vegas in Bangkok”!

    There are always some examples of the titles which would have worked pretty fine without any changes but they were made anyway. Jerry Zucker’s “Ghost” as “Uwierz w ducha” – “Believe in Ghost” or “Brokeback Mountain” as “Tajemnica Brokeback Mountain” – “Brokeback Mountain’s Mystery”. This still kinda works but I find it useless for any other than promotional reason.

    More to come! 😀

    You should create the same topic in the Emmy section, regarding TV shows (I would to that myself but I don’t want to steal your idea). 
     

    Ces´c´ (dobre dzien)
    Glad you like my idea. I didnt think about TV-Series… so you should do it. It is your idea : )

    by the way
    La Jungla de Cristal (Crystal Jungle) for Die Hard!

    ReplyCopy URL
    Jake
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jul 2nd, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #50079

    Ooh… decent effort with Polish greetings!

    I’ll do TV series then. Thanks! 

    ReplyCopy URL
    Jose Manuel Garcia
    Participant
    Joined:
    May 16th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #50080

    Well, considering that i lived 6 months in Lódz´, my polish is quite awful now 🙂

    ReplyCopy URL
    babypook
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 4th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #50081

    Kurosawa’s masterpiece, “Rashomon”, literally means castle gate, because Rashomon existed between Nara and Kyoto, or Jeiyoko, which roughly translates into ‘grove here’ or close to that. That’s where the story takes place.
      The anglo version is renamed “The Outrage” (Martin Ritt). Not too sure why.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Renaton
    Member
    Joined:
    Jun 4th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #50082

    Today I watched “Tinker, Taylor, Soldier, Spy” (as you might have noticed), and here in Brazil it’s named “The Spy Who Knew Too Much”.

    There are several other cases, I’ll post them when I remember them. Two very recent ones though were “No Country For Old Men” becoming “Where The Weak Won’t Last” and “The Hurt Locker” that became the extremely generic title “War On Terror”.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Jose Manuel Garcia
    Participant
    Joined:
    May 16th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #50083

    The answer for the ones i put before

    Sonrisas y Lágrimas (Cheers and Tears) = The Sound of Music
    Con la muerte en los talones (Death on my heels) = North by Northwest
    La legión invencible (The invincible legion) = SHE WORE A YELLOW RIBBON
    De entre los muertos (Among the deaths) = Vertigo
    Con Faldas y a lo loco (Wearing skirts and acting crazy) = Someone like it hot

    About “The Hurt locker” it was translate like “En tierra hostil” -> “In hostile land”
     

    ReplyCopy URL
    dannyboy.
    Participant
    Joined:
    Oct 11th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #50084

    Fascinating topic Jose, thanks for posting.. In my own observation, I would say at least 75% of films title’s change over when sold to Distributors. It is probably far more rare for a film to actually be called its in-production name. Do you think Executive Producers should retain the right to choose? The Director? Or should each Distributor decipher what is right for each geographic location?

    ReplyCopy URL
    Jose Manuel Garcia
    Participant
    Joined:
    May 16th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #50085

    I guess the best is keeping the original title if it is possible. But i guess it sometimes is impossible. 
    One of my teachers told me that when you do a translation you should not do it word by word… you should translate the idea. Many times the title of the movies has double meanings… that in other language doesnt happen.

    Imagine “Building Castles in Spain” For us, it will have no sense… so you should look for something similar for the title… and it will be “Building Castles in the Air”

    So i guess, it should be someone who know both languages who choose the most similar in meaning.

    The question, who should give the first title? the director, the producer… 

    ReplyCopy URL
Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
Reply To: This is not what it is supposed to be named in your language

You can use BBCodes to format your content.
Your account can't use Advanced BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.

Similar Topics
Hunter-ish - Oct 20, 2017
Movies
OnTheAisle - Oct 20, 2017
Movies