Home Forums Movies Was it a shock when Malcolm McDowell wasn’t nominated for A Clockwork Orange?

Was it a shock when Malcolm McDowell wasn’t nominated for A Clockwork Orange?

CREATE A NEW TOPIC
CREATE A NEW POLL
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
Created
2 years ago
Last Reply
2 years ago
16
replies
1744
views
13
users
2
2
2
  • RobertPius
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 22nd, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #599710

    It has become kind of an iconic role. The film and director were nominated, why not McDowell? 

    The other nominees were Gene Hackman (obvious) George C. Scott (great film and performance, plus it showed their integrity since he had refused the award the year before) Topol (popular film, so I guess),Peter Finch (groundbreaking film) but Walter Matthau? 

    Memories? Ideas? 

     

    Reply
    benbraddock
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 4th, 2013
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #599715

    For me, the film of the year with the best performance by an actor….. So yes, it was shocking that Matthau took his spot.

    ReplyCopy URL
    tennisfreak
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jan 18th, 2013
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #599720

    That’s not the kind of film or performance the Oscars were ever going to gravitate to at that time so, no. Not shocking. They respected Kubrick clearly but I think the younger actos in the Academy probably threw behind Hackman and Finch and the older actors behind the others as they were likely repulsed by the level of violence. Not in the slightest bit shocking that this got passed over in that day and age.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Mad Max Guitarist
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jan 24th, 2016
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #599721

    He should’ve won one over Hackman IMO. I guess A Clockwork Orange wasn’t a cup of tea for the academy back then

    ReplyCopy URL
    OnTheAisle
    Participant
    Joined:
    Sep 19th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #599726

    In retrospect, I would argue that Malcolm McDowell’s biggest obstacle for that Best Actor nomination was Jack Nicholson.

    Nicholson starred in Mike Nichols’s popular contemporary satire Carnal Knowledge opposite Best Supporting Actress nominee Ann-Margret.

    Both Nicholson and McDowell were nominated for Best Actor at the Golden Globes. Each played an unlikeable character whose overwhelming personality trait was misogyny.

    Walter Matthau was competing with two popular comedic performances in Kotch and A New Leaf.

    As we have seen many times, two similar performances split the vote allowing the actor playing the likeable character to win the contested nomination, helped by two hit films in a single voting period.

    ReplyCopy URL
    RobertPius
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 22nd, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #599725

    That’s not the kind of film or performance the Oscars were ever going to gravitate to at that time so, no. Not shocking. They respected Kubrick clearly but I think the younger actos in the Academy probably threw behind Hackman and Finch and the older actors behind the others as they were likely repulsed by the level of violence. Not in the slightest bit shocking that this got passed over in that day and age.

    But the film got directing, writing, editing and best picture nominations. Seems odd that the actor’s branch would be so conservative.    

    ReplyCopy URL
    Mad Max Guitarist
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jan 24th, 2016
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #599758

    Yeah, it’s strange actually. Even BAFTA show no love for McDowell

    ReplyCopy URL
    Andrew Carden
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jan 16th, 2016
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #599778

    McDowell would’ve needed significant support from the film critics’ precursors to have a prayer and that didn’t come to fruition, despite the film’s Best Picture victory at NYFCC. While “Kotch” is largely forgotten now, it was a modest success at the time, marking Jack Lemmon’s directorial debut, and Matthau was in two other hits that year as well – “A New Leaf” and “Plaza Suite.” A much safer, more mainstream pick than McDowell.

    ReplyCopy URL
    tennisfreak
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jan 18th, 2013
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #599779

    [quote=”tennisfreak”]

    That’s not the kind of film or performance the Oscars were ever going to gravitate to at that time so, no. Not shocking. They respected Kubrick clearly but I think the younger actos in the Academy probably threw behind Hackman and Finch and the older actors behind the others as they were likely repulsed by the level of violence. Not in the slightest bit shocking that this got passed over in that day and age.

    But the film got directing, writing, editing and best picture nominations. Seems odd that the actor’s branch would be so conservative.    
    [/quote]

    These are the people that were giving out acting awards to people like Art Carney over literally anyone who deserved it. Their taste wasn’t exactly the best.

    ReplyCopy URL
    keithw
    Participant
    Joined:
    Aug 17th, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #599803

    Donald Sutherland also would have been a worthy contender for “Klute”, Warren Beatty in “McCabe & Mrs. Miller”, Michael Jayston in the Best Picture nominee that year “Nicholas & Alexandra”, Timothy Bottoms in “The Last Picture Show”…..there were a few contenders.   Gene Hackman was a worthy winner.  I think the runner-up in the voting was Peter Finch (Sunday Bloody Sunday), followed by Topol, Geroge C. Scott and then Walter Matthau.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Michael Norris
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jan 24th, 2013
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #599805

    My guess would be that it might’ve been looked at as something like Hardy in MMFR or Coltrane in Boyhood. The movie itself was probably getting all the credit without those performances really being discussed that much. I think McDowell’s performance became renowned with history.

    ReplyCopy URL
    babypook
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 4th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #599816

    It won the HUGO for Burgess and Kubrick, which is one of the most prestigious honours granted to a Sci-fi work. That had to mean more to the former than an Oscar.

    That a film like this, a dystopian sci-fi garnering four Oscar nods at that time says a lot for those staid, older white gents comprising the Academy.

    He made some edgy, non-conforming films in his day; If, O Lucky Man!, Cat People, The Raging Moon, and even the gawd awful Caligula. Very happy to see him working so much to this day.

    I dont think anyone expected him to get a nomination for this, never mind any kind of win for him, or the visionary film.

    ReplyCopy URL
    KyleBailey
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 15th, 2013
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #600680

    All I know is Matthau in Kotch was such a lame nomination and Malcom or Gene Wilder for Willy Wonka deserved that slot 

    ReplyCopy URL
    Andrew Carden
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jan 16th, 2016
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #600702

    I know he was campaigned in Lead but man, I have a tough time considering Gene Wilder in “Willy Wonka” a leading turn.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Madson Melo
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jul 25th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #600783

    The performance was overshadowed by the production.

    ReplyCopy URL
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Similar Topics
Andrew ... - Nov 18, 2017
Movies
Chris B... - Nov 17, 2017
Movies