When did you first lose faith in the Oscars?

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  • KT
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    #140601

    I don’t think this question has been asked recently….I’m curious for people who have watched and followed the Oscars (everyone here), when did you first lose faith in the awards, and/or realized that they weren’t necessarily honoring quality or going to the “right” films and performances?  Was there a particular year, category, or result that infuriated you and made you think of the Oscars differently?  Questioning the voting and the makeup of the Academy, hating how people must campaign to be noticed, how voters don’t watch everything, how big personalities can influence and bully voters?  Maybe something that made you see there was a difference between public and private (industry) perception?

    I’m not interested in responses by people saying they always knew the Oscars were ridiculous because I think we all start off with some optimism before we are old enough or interested enough to understand the system.  Before we become cynical.  I have met some high profile voters and it seemed like they take voting very seriously, though they recognized it’s a total crapshoot and they’ve hated some results.  And contrary to what some people might say, there are years the Academy makes the right choice or an unexpectedly great choice of the films in contention (let’s face it, foreign films don’t have a prayer for Best Picture).  There are certainly some great and inspired winners.  I think plenty of people out there believe the Academy actually chooses the best film of the year, regardless of their own viewing experience.  But I’m sure there were some moments that really made you question why you care so much and follow the awards every year.  What are they?

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    Riley
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    #140603

    I have not been following long, so I am embarrassed to say that Zero Dark Thirty was actually a big one for me.  The Hurt Locker did well and I naively thought that Zero Dark Thirty‘s 95 on Metacritic made it undeniable.  I brushed off its SAG ensemble snub as something of an anomaly, but not only was the film not a player for the win at all once nominations came out, but where was Kathryn Bigelow.  Then I had one of those “I am so done with these” thoughts and I think that I was not quite so active on Gold Derby for a bit after.

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    TomHardys
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    #140604

    Like I said multiple times before, 1999 was an awful year. I don’t agree with any of the winners (no, not even Judi Dench) and Paltrow and Benigni winning over Fernanda Montenegro/Cate Blanchett and Ian McKellen/Nick Nolte/Jim Carrey (whom was not even not nominated – another horrible mistake) was just hideous.

    There are plenty of examples that translate how uninspiring the Academy be sometimes. Christian Bale being nominated over Tom Hanks is the most recent one. 

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    Emil Petrov
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    #140605

    It’s hart to keep loving the Academy when they rewarding s**t fests like Crash and The Hurt Locker. 

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    DominicCobb
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    #140606

    Well I’m fairly young. I’ve known about the Oscars since at least the early 2000’s, my first concrete memory is LOTR: Return of the King winning everything, though I know that wasn’t the first ceremony I watched. I’ve tuned in every year since, but I didn’t really know about the predicting game until I saw some guy on TV predicting the top categories for 2006, which he got right. In 2007, I started my subscription to EW, so that was the first year I knew what was in the game. 

    A year later was when I lost faith. It was for 2008. The Dark Knight was my favorite film of the year (and still is), and before nominations were announced I knew it had a really good shot at BP and BD. But it didn’t get in. The Reader did. Phuck The Reader.

    I’ve viewed Oscars with skepticism ever since. 

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    Eddy Q
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    #140607

    What are you all talking about? The Oscars are always right.

    Nah kidding, personally I don’t remember a certain year that I lost faith in Oscars, but I recall as a teenager we had an out-of-date edition of Halliwell Film Guide at home, and at the back was a full list of past Oscar winners in the big 8 categories. Some of them seemed so random to me and out of touch with what I thought I knew about film. I went through a short period of doubting my own tastes (I was young and naive) before reading more into it and realising that it was fashionable for film lovers to complain about Oscars, that they have no relevance to the narrative of film history and that I should grow a pair and have faith in my opinions. Since then I have never wavered.

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    Eddy Q
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    #140608

    Oh and Emil Petrov, The Hurt Locker is no sh*tfest. One of the few BP winners I agree with. I’ll let you off for Crash.

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    Gabriel
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    #140609

    I realized the Oscars are meaningless as I gradually became aware of the extent of campaigning, so I would probably say it was the early to mid 2000s, when I realized just how much oscar politics (e.g. whose “turn” it is to win) and money determine winners, and not the art.

    But I would say it was 2006 when I completely lost faith in them. It was the year when David Lynch campaigned for Laura Dern with that that terrific performance piece on Sunset Boulevard with a live cow. A profound, and frankly depressing commentary on how reluctant the Academy is in recognizing visionary artists who don’t have the money to campaign alongside the big studios.

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    Logan
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    #140610

    This would be to say that I think my taste is more right than anyone else’s, but Ron Howard winning over David Lynch would have done the trick.

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    Eddy Q
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    #140611

    ^tell me about it. And over Robert Altman too, I might add.

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    Beau S.
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    #140612

    They started giving me a sour taste in my mouth after Forrest Gump sweeped and then Nicole Kidman was snubbed for To Die For. When Ron Howard defeated Altman/Lynch/Jackson then I lost faith. They did themselves in when The King’s Speech defeated literally every other film released that year. The Zero Dark Thirty debacle last year didn’t help.

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    Emil Petrov
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    #140613

    Oh and Emil Petrov, The Hurt Locker is no sh*tfest. One of the few BP winners I agree with. I’ll let you off for Crash.

     No hard feelings. I just dislike the movie quite a bit, that’s all. At the oscars it just pissed me off that this movie won both sounds for standart gunfight and explosions and defeated Avatar that actually CREATED and entire sound unvierse of Pandora. But no, THL had guns. How original. 

    And it won screenplay over Inglourious Basterds! WHAT SCREENPLAY? That movie was only held togeter by strong directing. Anything else in it was pure crap. But that’s a lone man’s opinion.

    As for Crash, this movie even today still baffles me.  

    It sucks when the movie you beleive must win looses.

    2004 – Million Dollar Baby – I liked it alot, but it was The Aviator that was the true Best Picture
    2005 – Brokeback Mountain is Best Picture that year. In my mind it is the winner. How Crash even got nominated is a mystery.
    2006 – I agree with The Departed. It was quality movie. But I believe that Children of Men, Pan’s Labyrinth and The Prestige were worthy of nominations.
    2007 – Atonement was the Best Picture, but it lost to another qility movie in No Country for Old Men.
    2008 – The Dark Knight was the best, but Slumdog was a good choice. Very original movie.
    2009 – I stated my opinion on The HURT Locker. The true winner was Inglourious Basters or even Avatar.
    2010 – The Social Networ. Period.
    2011 – Poor year. Very poor.
    2012 – Life of Pi and Django were the best, but I agree with Argo. It was an entertaining film.

    All of those dissapointments made me hate the Oscars. But I still love them. I just do. We all do.  

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    Tye-Grr
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    #140614

    I’ve never “lost faith” with the Oscars in that I’ve never put that much stock in them to begin with. I love them, I love that they recognize what they feel are the best in film, but that’s exactly it; it’s about what they feel. I disagree with them all the time, but it’s never made me feel less about them. 

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    keithw
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    #140615

    I first watched the Oscars when I was a kid after seeing “Airport”.   I loved that movie and wanted to see how it would do.  I had also seen “Love Story”.  The following year was when I became really interested because I was a huge Jane Fonda fan.  After that, I have never missed an Oscars show.   They simply give the Oscars to the people / movie that got the most votes.  Not everyone is going to agree with every choice but it is just how the votes go.  For example, I have always thought Art Carney deserved his Oscar for “Harry & Tonto” while many do not!  I have never lost faith in the Oscars and it is always my favourite night to watch tv.  This year will not be an exception.  I do wish they would get more of the “legendary” or “older” actors/actresses to present…..I do miss that from the earlier days.

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    ETPhoneHome
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    #140616

    Maybe I’m naïve, but I still have faith in the Oscars. I rarely agree with their selections, but I recognize what they are. There is never a consensus on what the best films and performances of each year are, and some of the best performances and films don’t get the audience that they deserve.

    I haven’t seen all the Best Pictures yet. But I find that all the ones I have seen were at least decent films, and I can understand how they were selected, even if I find another film is better. A campaign can only go so far, even nowadays, and the current best picture lineup doesn’t have any films that I would write off as terrible.

    Call me crazy if you want, but I still see the oscars as the most reliable award for identifying a film worth watching. There are always other films to watch, and that’s why I saw more than 9 films last year. I generally look for quality films, and by following the Oscars, I generally find what I’m looking for.

    They’re not perfect, but I like the Oscars. As I see it, I would need to see a truly terrible film win best picture to lessen my faith in them.

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