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When the Narrative dictates a win

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  • Philip
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    #1202441522

    So I forced myself to rewatch Boyhood tonight, I didn’t really like it when I saw it a few years ago, but I figured maybe watching it again would maybe change my mind.

    It didn’t, but it got me thinking. Which winners do you guys think were more Narrative based and not performance based.

    I personally don’t see anything Oscar worthy in Patricia Arquette’s performance and I wonder if she mostly won because if her dedication to the film.

    Now I do believe that there are plenty of wins where the performance and narrative combine to make the perfect storm for a win aka Kate Winslet in The Reader.

    So long story short, what do you guys think falls into this category.

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    Pulp
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    #1202441530

    Leo

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    Foolio
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    #1202441545

    Yeah DiCaprio’s Oscar was the ultimate example of the Academy rewarding an actor for everything he’d been snubbed for through years rather than the performance at hand.

    Also, Ingrid Bergman winning for Anastacia had an air of a “welcome back, we forgive you” narrative rather than rewarding the performance.

    There are many more examples of course.

    As for Arquette, her performance was considered a towering achievement, not just because of dedication (Ethan Hawke was no less dedicated and didn’t win shit) but because of the quality of the performance. Whatever you personally think of her work, I don’t see her victory as a typical example of narrative over quality at all.

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    Philip
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    #1202441552

    Yeah DiCaprio’s Oscar was the ultimate example of the Academy rewarding an actor for everything he’d been snubbed for throughout years rather than the performance at hand.

    Also, Ingrid Bergman winning for Anastacia had an air of a “welcome back, we forgive you” narrative rather than rewarding the performance.

    There are many more examples of course.

    As for Arquette, her performance was considered a towering achievement, not just because of dedication (Ethan Hawke was no less dedicated and didn’t win shit) but because of the quality of the performance. Whatever you personally think of her work, I don’t see her victory as a typical example of narrative over quality at all.

    Really? Cause there isn’t much substance there. She gets married a few times, we don’t even see a really great scene between her and the second husband and then she had that last scene which is just acted horribly.

    Also, I think Leo somewhat falls into this category. But the performance is pretty physical and required a lot of skill. Is it one of the best performances from that year, no, personally I would have gone with Redmayne, but he had previously won the year before for a lackluster performance.

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    Philip
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    #1202441554

    Also, Ethan Hawke was never winning just based in narrative when you had a powerhouse performance like Simmons in the category.

    People considered Supporting Actress weak that year, but I would rank Emma and Keira way way way above Arquette.

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    mckenzie
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    #1202441623

    Judi Dench?
    Sandra Bullock maybe.

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    Jake
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    #1202441651

    Meryl Streep’s third
    “The Salesman”
    Elizabeth Taylor’s first
    Katharine Hepburn’s second
    DiCaprio AND Winslet
    Jennifer Hudson

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    Jake
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    #1202441659

    People considered Supporting Actress weak that year, but I would rank Emma and Keira way way way above Arquette.

    Even then it was terrible.

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    Foolio
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    #1202441680

    Also, Ethan Hawke was never winning just based in narrative when you had a powerhouse performance like Simmons in the category.

    People considered Supporting Actress weak that year, but I would rank Emma and Keira way way way above Arquette.

    Like I said, Arquette’s performance was widely considered to be a monumental achievement, regardless of what you or I think of it. That’s why she was the front runner almost from the get-go, and that’s why I don’t think it’s a very illustrative example of narrative winning over quality.

    Oh yeah @jake, Elizabeth Taylor’s Oscar for BUtterfield8 is a prime case in point!

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    Macca
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    #1202441696

    “The Salesman”

    I see this as the PRIME example of narrative over achievement.

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    M: The Original
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    #1202441711

    Arquette “ages” in front of us in a single movie without the aid of makeup. Arquette never quiet landed a nominate-able role through her varied career. But the supporting categories are more often than not career achievement recognition than merely the work of a single performance being cited.

    Defoe and Metcalf definitely are getting it for what they’ve done and this is now or never for a competitive citation to victory.

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    sofan
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    #1202441768

    Came here to say Leonardo DiCaprio but others already beat me to it.

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    Atypical
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    #1202441897

    Leo & Kate are two glaring examples. Sadly, in both cases, the overdue narrative eclipsed the actual performances that they won Oscars for, which were inferior to some of their best nominated and snubbed work.

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    Joe Burns
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    #1202441957

    Hmmm, interesting question:

    1. Leo- Although the film was popular and his performance was impressive, his overdue narrative was the driving factor here.

    2. Julianne Moore- She was way overdue, the whole industry knew this, and her performance was fantastic. Still, if she had won before, I’m not sure how she would have figured in the race. She may not have even been nominated at all.

    3. Sandra Bullock- Everyone’s love for her as an actress got this one for her.

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    FreemanGriffin
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    #1202441977

    Having seen Darkest Hour I now believe that Gary Oldman only wins based on his alleged narrative of having a long career of great performances (I can only count 3 films of his (Sid and Nancy, Prick Up Your Ears, and The Contender) that deserved Oscar nominations; didn’t much care for Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, his only previous nomination and I wouldn’t have had him on my list of nominees that year). Timothee Chalamet gives the best acting performance by anyone I have seen (so far) this year, but his age and Oldman’s “narrative” could very well mean Oldman will win.

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