Home Forums Movies Will another Epic film EVER win Best Picture??

Will another Epic film EVER win Best Picture??

CREATE A NEW TOPIC
CREATE A NEW POLL
Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
Created
9 months ago
Last Reply
9 months ago
10
replies
866
views
9
users
Jason Travis
2
Karl Vincent
1
John
1
  • Jason Travis
    Participant
    Joined:
    May 20th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202027948

    With this new preferential ballot system, it seems evident that we’re in for some long years of smaller films taking 2-3 Oscars including best picture whilst the epics will sweep tech categories and possibly director but won’t be able to claim the top honor. I respect smaller films and Moonlight breaking barriers and taking risks, but La La Land clearly seemed poised to win had it not been for that weighted system.

    Will future best picture films be like Now – only taking a couple of awards.

    Also it’s strange that for a second year in a row the PGA has not matched the Oscars despite both being preferential voting.

    Follow Me on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/jasonmovieguy
    13K Subscribers, 29 Million Views

    FYC: Derbyite of the Year, 2017

    Reply
    Karl Vincent
    Participant
    Joined:
    Sep 19th, 2014
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202027960

    It would take a James Cameron or Peter Jackson for a big movie to win Best Picture. The Academy loooved independent film so much.

    ReplyCopy URL
    John
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jun 3rd, 2015
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202028034

    The first challenge raising the capital necessary to make an epic. I don’t believe the studios are willing to take the kinds of financial risks they did before 1970 with productions like The Ten Commandments, Ben-Hur, Lawrence of Arabia, Gone with the Wind and All Quiet on the Western Front. There have been films like Titanic, Schindler’s List, and Reds, but the don’t seem to have the scale of the pre-1970 epics.

    I agree with Karl Vincent that it also requires a director who can helm the complexity of making large scale movie, and the producers to organize and provide the resources for that director. In short, all the planets and stars will have to align correctly, and the film making universe isn’t structured very well at present for that to happen.

    John

    ReplyCopy URL
    Roney Moore
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jun 7th, 2016
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202028036

    The preferential ballot doesn’t necessarily have to help out smaller films by nature, but it jeopardizes movies that are mostly made for entertainment value and doesn’t have an important message to send. If one epic comes along that has, why not.

    Though I am still skeptical whether if it is a true deal breaker or not. The Revenant would have been the goriest and emptiest(story-wise) winner in a long time and have never been the true consensus all season. This year was special. The main criticism that have been aimed at LLL wasn’t even related to anything the film has done wrong in its context but rather that the idea of what picking a movie like that would represent for the industry and their mood after the year we’ve had. That can’t be the determinative factor for too long. Anyone who is saying that a movie like LLL would have never won under this system in any other year is wrong.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Atypical
    Participant
    Joined:
    Dec 1st, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202028046

    It’s nothing arduous about the sea change of smaller, independent films finding their way to BP with the preferential vote than the days of yore when bloated epics winning were the norm instead. That is all very exciting in my book. “Moonlight” winning BP is monumental for the Academy in so many ways, and let’s not forget that this is the same Academy that not all that long ago picked choices like “Braveheart,” “The English Patient,” and “A Beautiful Mind” as its favorites. It’s sad that “Moonlight”‘s being overshadowed by this “Envelopegate” nonsense. No one involved in the film deserves the level of baggage that will forever be associated with it now.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Lord Freddy Blackfyre
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 3rd, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202028139

    I would prefer that Manchester By The Sea, Hidden Figures or Hacksaw Ridge have won but I have no problem with Moonlight winning over the extreme overrated La La Land.

    I don’t think the preferential ballot hurt big epic movies (which LLL is not) but divisive movies like Avatar, The Revenant or Boringhood.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Jason Travis
    Participant
    Joined:
    May 20th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202028284

    @lordfreddy: I respect your opinion (and would have preferred Manchester over Moonlight), but I have to say- La La Land is in every way epic. Sweeping in scope, amazing production values, large musical numbers mixed with aesthetics out of this world. It’s 14 nominations also indicate it indeed was massive across the board.

    Follow Me on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/jasonmovieguy
    13K Subscribers, 29 Million Views

    FYC: Derbyite of the Year, 2017

    ReplyCopy URL
    Tyler The Awesome Guy
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 19th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202028295

    Yeah maybe. I think that genres go in cycles and that it takes the rest person with the rest script and the rest cast to strike gold. It will eventually.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Bee
    Participant
    Joined:
    Oct 25th, 2016
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202028298

    It was massive because the Academy can’t resist a sunny musical with two attractive leads in a love story in Hollywood. So of course, with the guilds and extreme critic support, it was going to get that amount of nominations. The fact that it only won six, less than half of its Nominations, shows that it in fact was divisive when it came to actually rewarding it. The Globes just went crazy for it because it was a musical, but the Academy were not going to all Titanic or Lord of the Rings for it because not everybody loved La La Land like they loved the other two.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Jason Travis
    Participant
    Joined:
    May 20th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202028332

    I’m not sure Titanic would have won on a preferential ballot, though I personally was gaga for it when it came out (1997). But there were a lot of divisive opinions on it. The question remains, what WOULD have won in 1997 instead? Maybe Good Will Hunting? It would have fit the 3 Oscar rule for Best Pic it seems (Best Film, Supporting acting award, screenplay). Lord of the Rings I think def would have won.

    BASED ON PAST YEARS, HERE’S MY TAKE ON WHAT FILM WOULD HAVE WON ON PREFERENTIAL HAD IT EXISTED. Feel free to add your own take, this could be interesting 🙂
    ____________

    1990: Dances with Wolves

    I still think Costner’s film would have gotten the passion votes since it was very popular. Goodfellas of course has a slightly stronger following today, but I’m trying to think how voters would have thought back then.

    1991: The Silence of the Lambs

    Def this one- it’s passion is what won it all 5 honors in the first place. Maybe preferential would have been kind to Beauty and the Beast, but I remember reading about a slight backlash with the movie when the screeners sent out for it were actually just a 10-minute preview and a lot of voters were not happy.

    1992: Unforgiven

    Going with the love of Eastwood here and the fact that 1992 was a fairly weak lineup. Thought I could def have seen a surge for The Crying Game.

    1993: Schindler’s List

    Everyone knew it was Spielberg’s year, and this is one of the best of all time. But last minute word was Jane Campion’s The Piano was gaining steam and the fact that it won both Screenplay and the surprise Best Supporting Actress could have had it on a lot of number 2 ballots. So this would have been closer then we think.

    1994: Forrest Gump

    If this was released 10 years later, then Shawshank I think. But because of the Gump phenomenon, I think it still prevails. Pulp Fiction was arguably still too divisive.

    1995: Apollo 13

    Even without the Directing nod, I think Ron Howard’s movie would have prevailed here. It was the early favorite, it was safer, and no one really “hated” it. Braveheart, which I love, def had it’s detractors.

    1996: Fargo

    As big as The English Patient was – 9 wins!- you could feel the surge of support in the room for the Coen Bros. film, and it won leading actress and screenplay– perfectly fitting the mold for one movie taking lots of tech honors, and then a smaller film taking just 3. This on top of the fact that English Patient lost Adapted Screenplay (mind you to the superior Sling Blade), tells me a weighted ballot would have given the Coens a possible edge.

    1997: Good Will Hunting

    Titanic won 11. Yes, I know. And maybe with the preferential ballot system it would still be too big to ignore. But I think based on that system there would be a lot of folks ranking Cameron’s movie last. And Good Will Hunting still getting lots of number 2 placements. L.A Confidential perhaps too, but it comes off a bit cold. I loved As Good As it Gets but remember reading many critics didn’t care for it either vs the ones who loved it.

    1998: NO IDEA!!! Shakespeare in Love vs Saving Private Ryan

    Is it crazy for me to NOT be able to think what would have happened with this? Both movies at the time had lots of passion. And as much as SIL’s win now stings, back in 1998 there were plenty who didn’t want to feel obligated to vote for Spielberg’s war film and plenty who loved the witty and lightweightness of John Madden’s picture. So honestly I have no idea. Both movies battled it out and I suspect it would have been a tight race ala Gravity vs 12 Years a Slave.

    1999: American Beauty

    I really want to put The Sixth Sense here, but because of Miramax’s shrewish campaign for the average Cider House Rules, I suspect voters would probably be marking that movie down higher. American Beauty still seems to have the edge, though I don’t care for it as much as I did then and there were some pretty nasty critics that didn’t fall for the cliches I fell for when seeing it in high school.

    2000: Traffic

    Def don’t think Gladiator would have won here on the ballot system. And I think passion would have streamed between Sodebergh’s film and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. But I’m willing to bet the farm that Traffic would have taken it. It won Best Director in what was considered a surprise and Screenplay plus acting and editing (?).

    2001: Lord of the Rings: Fellowship of the Ring

    I remember being so disappointed when Ron Howard’s fair but not amazing Beautiful Mind won here. Amazing acting, but was it best picture worthy? It just seems so…vanilla. Would voters have been more tempted to go for the more arty Moulin Rouge! or Jackson’s first installment? The only reason putting LOTR here is risky is because it didn’t win a writing or acting honor. My vote that year: Todd Hayne’s In the Bedroom. It’s the film of 2001 I keep watching the most.

    2002: The Pianist

    You could tell Chicago was thisclose to losing the top prize when Roman Polanski’s haunting film took surprise honors in three categories- Best Actor, Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay. I loved Chicago, but that weighted system might have given us something different. Since Gangs of New York and The Hours were heavily divided, and the second installment of the Rings film didn’t have any director or screenplay nods- I say The Pianist would have trumped.

    2003: Lord of the Rings: Return of the King

    I think this would have still happened. MAYBE Mystic River might have snuck in since Eastwood is a master with personal stories, but I say voters were all ready to finally honor the saga correctly.

    2004: Million Dollar Baby

    Perfect example of exactly what’s been happening now- small, intimate project trumps bigger, flashier film. As much as I liked The Aviator, I love Million Dollar Baby and I can see why voters were so moved. I say it would have taken it here too.

    2005: NO IDEA!! Brokeback vs Crash all over again

    With Moonlight breaking ground with being the first “gay” film to ever win, I still think voters were too divided back then to pick Ang Lee’s beautiful project the top prize. But would Crash have trumped the preferential ballot system, or would we have had a surprise like Capote or Good Night, and Good Luck?

    2006: Little Miss Sunshine

    A risky pick? Perhaps. But as much as voters knew Scorsese was due for director, was Little Miss Sunshine closer then we think? Winning Supporting Actor and Original Screenplay. Tricky. I don’t see The Queen, Babel or Letters from Iwo Jima in the running.

    2007: No Country for Old Men

    Such a dark year for cinema. Not sure if There Will Be Blood would have made it, but perhaps? A bit foggy here.

    2008: Slumdog Millionaire

    Voters just loved this one.

    Follow Me on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/jasonmovieguy
    13K Subscribers, 29 Million Views

    FYC: Derbyite of the Year, 2017

    ReplyCopy URL
    GusCruz
    Participant
    Joined:
    Feb 26th, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #1202028380

    Your concept of “epic” is different from mine.

    ReplyCopy URL
Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
Reply To: Will another Epic film EVER win Best Picture??

You can use BBCodes to format your content.
Your account can't use Advanced BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.

Similar Topics
Enygma - Dec 11, 2017
Movies
Freeman... - Dec 11, 2017
Movies