Will any of the 2015 best picture contenders hold up in the next several years?

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  • Evergreen
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    #175377

    Out of the 2015 best picture contenders, what films will we still talk about in 5-10 years from now?

    Also out of the best picture contenders, what films will have the best replay value and home viewing experience?

     

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    24Emmy
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    #175379

    Birdman, Boyhood, Selma, and Whiplash will be considered future classics. The others not so much.

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    Lord Freddy Blackfyre
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    #175380

    Let  me check with Nostradamus and i’ll tell you later, The truth is nobody knows.

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    DominicCobb
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    #175381

    Boyhood, The Grand Budapest Hotel, Birdman, and Whiplash. They have the best replay value and will have long lives after the ceremony. 

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    Macbeth
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    #175382

    Yes, actually for the first time, most of them. 

    The ones which WON’T are American Sniper, The Theory of Everything and The Imitation Game.  They are bland biopics that we see every year and are becoming a dime a dozen. They are more obligations for people to watch rather than classics. I know a lot of people will watch them, but very few will rewatch them, to be perfectly honest. They just don’t have the replay value in my eyes.

    Selma could go either way. It is a very different movie about racism and the civil rights movement, and one that is very unique. I haven’t seen it yet, but from what I’ve read, it is actually quite spectacular and different. I can’t make up my mind about it because I haven’t seem it, but if it tells the historical story well, and is different to a typical biopic, then it could hold up. 

    The Grand Budapest Hotel will most likely become a timeless classic that some people love and others hate. It will probably live in the lexicon of film for a long time, depending on if Wes Anderson goes in a different direction now, or if he tops himself with a better project. If this is seen as his magnum opus, you can bet that it is becoming a classic.

    Whiplash will be seen as a perfectly unique and wonderful use of independent filmmaking to create a unique story. The way Chazelle made the film, told the story and brought out those two lead performances are going to really make it an indie classic.

    Boyhood will forever be seen as the ultimate passion project and film experiment. However, it could get dated very easily, but I think in itself, it is quite unique and will be a part of film history, love the film or hate it.

    Then it comes down to Birdman.  My only solace in this talk of Redmayne or Cooper winning Best Actor over Michael Keaton is that Birdman is by far the more superior film. Birdman IS film history right there. It will be forever taught in acting schools to show different examples of acting, overacting and character development. It will be taught in film schools when teaching about technical stuff like long takes and cinematography and editing. It will sit on DVD store shelves and in personal collections, and will be brought out on movie nights by people all around the world who want to watch something “smart but funny”. It will be forever used as an example of unique meta filmmaking, and has a certain air of prestige about it. There is no doubt that Birdman will live a lot longer than films such as The Theory of Everything and The Imitation Game

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    Renaton
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    #175383

    Eh. I think only Budapest will see its esteem actually rise, because it’s surprisingly entertaining. Maybe Whiplash, as more people find about it later on. For the rest, I think it’s more likely their reputation will deflate with time. Boyhood will likely build a legacy of sorts, especially because critics won’t want to abandon a film they championed so much when it just came out, but it also has nowhere else to go but see it’s repuattion and some minor revisionism from a few make it not as unanimous a reference, especially after it actually wins the BP Oscar. Birdman is likely to have it’s fans and get more, but it’s also just as likely to get more haters, so it might stay about even.

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    Macbeth
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    #175384

    Birdman is likely to have it’s fans and get more, but it’s also just as likely to get more haters, so it might stay about even.

    Aaah, but that’s the beauty of it Renato – haters do more good for a movie than bad. If my friend tells me about a movie he hated, my interest will be perked to see what was so bad about it. If he tells me about a movie he found boring, I might skip it altogether. Birdman is not a bad movie at all, and I suspect that over time, people will want to check it out regardless, and it will remain relatively popular as a film recommendation. I don’t know if anyone would ever want to rewatch or recommend The Theory of Everything or The Imitation Game when this race is over, regardless of if you liked it or not (I might have liked Lincoln and Zero Dark Thirty and The King’s Speech – but that doesn’t mean I have any intention of watching them again) – Birdman, Boyhood, Whiplash and The Grand Budapest Hotel do have that factor that makes people want to tell their friends to watch it, or rewatch it themselves.

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    24Emmy
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    #175385

    [quote=”Renato_Miranda”]Birdman is likely to have it’s fans and get more, but it’s also just as likely to get more haters, so it might stay about even.

    Aaah, but that’s the beauty of it Renato – haters do more good for a movie than bad. If my friend tells me about a movie he hated, my interest will be perked to see what was so bad about it. If he tells me about a movie he found boring, I might skip it altogether. Birdman is not a bad movie at all, and I suspect that over time, people will want to check it out regardless, and it will remain relatively popular as a film recommendation. I don’t know if anyone would ever want to rewatch or recommend The Theory of Everything or The Imitation Game when this race is over, regardless of if you liked it or not (I might have liked Lincoln and Zero Dark Thirty and The King’s Speech – but that doesn’t mean I have any intention of watching them again) – Birdman, Boyhood, Whiplash and The Grand Budapest Hotel do have that factor that makes people want to tell their friends to watch it, or rewatch it themselves.[/quote]

     

    Different films for different folks. I think we’re making this too limited. Every movie has that rewatch/recommend factor depending on the person. Lincoln was by far my favorite movie of 2012 and I’ve enjoyed the rewatches whenever I see it on HBO. I’ve recommended it to others. I wouldn’t dare put The Grand Budapest Hotel on again or recommend it to anyone.

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    ETPhoneHome
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    #175386

    Well 12 years from now, when Manhood comes out, everyone will be talking about Boyhood all over again. At the very least, we’ll see what happens in 2020 when Before (dawn?) comes out. Linklater’s legacy will only continue to grow with each film that matches his usual quality.

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    24Emmy
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    #175387

    Well 12 years from now, when Manhood comes out, everyone will be talking about Boyhood all over again. At the very least, we’ll see what happens in 2020 when Before (dawn?) comes out. Linklater’s legacy will only continue to grow with each film that matches his usual quality.

     

    Maybe we’ll hear about it next year. Richard Linklater considers his next film, That’s What I’m Talking About, a sequel to Boyhood because spoiler alert “it begins right where Boyhood ends with a guy showing up at college and meeting his new roommates and a girl.”


    Set in the 1980s, the film follows the lives of college freshmen who are also baseball players.

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    Tye-Grr
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    #175388

    I think ‘Boyhood’, ‘Birdman’, ‘Whiplash’ and ‘Grand Budapest’ will surely stand the test of time. ‘Selma’ is a maybe. 

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    Turner Unruh
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    #175389

    Boyhood will

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    Macbeth
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    #175391

    ‘The Lego Movie’  – definitely, without a doubt 

    ‘Foxcatcher’ – yes, and if for nothing more than a dramatic turn from both Channing Tatum and Steve Carell

    ‘Inherent Vice’ – oh god yes – this will become a huge cult classic 

    ‘Interstellar’ – even though I didn’t like it, it is of course going to become a classic sci-fi spectacle 

    ‘Nightcrawler’ – definitely

    ‘Mr. Turner’ – maybe. I could see it being forgotten 

    ‘Gone Girl’  – I think so, yes

    ‘Wild’ – nah, it isn’t too memorable 

    ‘Still Alice’ – with the exception of Moore’s performance, it is pretty forgettable

    ‘Unbroken’ – yes, but only as a misfire of a potential Best Picture winner

     

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    DominicCobb
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    #175392

    ^Good question. Lego and Guardians are huge successes and big audience favorites and will likely live on.

    Inherent Vice feels like a ready made cult classic. Nightcrawler too, maybe.

    I think Interstellar one of those films that more people appreciate as time goes on. People will still talk about it twenty years from now. 

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    DominicCobb
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    #175393

    Others, I don’t really think so.

    Gone Girl‘s great but somehow forgettable.
    Wild‘s great but I don’t think enough people saw it or cared.
    Foxcatcher‘s pretty good but it’ll probably only be remembered as Steve Carell’s first Oscar nom.
    Mr. Turner – no one saw it and no one will. Less facetiously, the people who wanted to see it have seen it. Won’t have much of a life beyond that. 
    Foreign language contenders tend to have to be something really special to live on in the mainstream memory. Don’t see any of that this year.
    Still Alice will only be remembered in the same way Scent of a Woman or the like is.
    Unbroken – nope. 

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