Home Forums Movies Wowie Zowie! the Big Short is the Best Picture of 2015!!!!!

Wowie Zowie! the Big Short is the Best Picture of 2015!!!!!

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  • FreemanGriffin
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    #203958

    I am shocked at how f-ing briliant and amazing The Big Short is! I wasn’t sure I was going to like this movie and I LOVED IT! This film is perfectly edited, has an amazing cast (that SAG nomiknation is 100% deserved), great politics (it’s leftist politics will appeal to the academy), great direction, every scene works, phenomenal direction, and if I had to pick just one acting MVP I would say Christian Bale, who I think will get a Best Supporting Actor nomination, and I am now predicting he will get the  GG for Best Actor in a Comedy/Musical. (Just like Spotlight, the story is the lead, and all of the actors play supporting roles). Brad Pitt is great, Steve Carell is amazing, I wish Marisa Tomei’s role was larger, every single cast member delivers. The actress who plays the “blind” bankster/credit rating approver was especially vivid, as was Katherine, the african-american woman who is Steve Carell’s boss (I think?). Great use of locations. The clips that were used served the story expertly.

    I am only predicting five Oscar nominations: Best Picture; Best Director (yes, I believe that Adam McKay’s direction will resonate with the mavericks/liberals in the director’s branch), Best Supporting Actor, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Film Editing. But I wasn’t sure it would get any noms when I entered the movie theatre.

    I am shocked by how great this movie is! This could be a spoiler in the race for Best Picture! (:

    At the end of the movie, I yelled out “VOTE FOR BERNIE SANDERS FOR PRESIDENT!!!!” Many audience members clapped and hooted and hollered “yes!”. If you see the movie you will understand why my shout out for Bernie was appropriate!!! (:

    I absolutely loved the breaking of the fourth wall. The comedy elements works brilliantly in telling the story. I knew a great deal about this subject but I learned a few new things from the movie.

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    Halo_Insider
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    #203960

    Hey, Freeman, appreciate the response, but I think someone already made a thread for The Big Short. Would you mind posting there instead?

    http://www.goldderby.com/forum/topics/view/12556/page:4

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    Riley
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    #203961

    So I saw this on Tuesday and I must concur.  I will be rooting for this one at the Oscars and if any film can take down Spotlight, it is this one.  Two things that you can be sure on are that The Big Short wins WGA Adapted and ACE Comedy.  That is a good hand.  My guess is that it takes Globe Comedy over pseudo-comedy The Martian too.

    Can it win SAG Ensemble?  Christian Bale did get nominated over Mark Ruffalo and Michael Keaton after all.  Now you could say that that is because The Big Short has been campaigning Steve Carell in lead, so he had no internal competition, but that line of thinking only works in hindsight.  You have to remember that SAG did their nominations before the Globes and Critics’ Choice, so that was before we knew that Carell and Bale were the official awards players for the movie.  Bale actually did have internal competition with Ryan Gosling, who even narrates the movie and appears in both his and Carell’s sections of the movie, whereas Bale only appears in Bale’s.  Plus SAG nominated Gosling years before they got to Bale and have even nominated Gosling when the Oscars snubbed him, while SAG has missed Bale when the Oscars nominated him.  And The Big Short had no buzz going into SAG, so again, there was not much way that voters knew to vote for Bale over Gosling.  And given that everything else from December and the end of November fared poorly (Creed, Joy, The Revenant, The Lady in the Van, 45 Years, Concussion, The Hateful Eight), it is remarkable that The Big Short got its nominations.  Nobody takes Beasts of No Nation, Trumbo or Straight Outta Compton seriously anyway, so The Big Short is definitely top two.

    In addition to Steve Carell, where the late campaign is really hurting this movie is in director.  This is a showy directorial outing unlike Spotlight, so director nominations really should have been gettable at Critics’ Choice and with more critics and maybe the Golden Globes.  It is just that the film peaked too late, so people did not know that they were allowed to vote for it there and Adam McKay does not have the name recognition of Martin Scorsese to automatically carry him.  He will rally enough to get DGA, BAFTA and the Oscar, but he might be out for a win without the precursor support.

    I admire how the campaign team here has bumped Steve Carell to lead.  It has been about twenty-five years since two supporting actors were nominated from the same movie and look at how Spotlight is paying the price.  Either they were cocky or stupid over there.  Steve Carell is not actually lead.  The movie is split into three or four sections, depending on how you count it.  Christian Bale has his own storyline and never appears in the others’.  Likewise, Brad Pitt never meets Bale, Gosling or Carell.  Gosling and Carell actually do cross over, so that immediately gives Carell a leg up in screen time and makes him the most believable to be campaigned in lead.  Gosling is the narrator and the movie begins with Bale’s story, but Carell probably does have the most screen time and also the most to do as an actor.  This last part makes his leading campaign bittersweet because while he cannot win lead, he would have stood a better chance of winning supporting than Bale.  Bale does have a tic-y character and that category is wide open, so he may still get swept to a win, but Carell gives speeches and cries.  So it goes.  Meanwhile, Ruffalo has a role with serious win potential between his tics, speeches and shouting, but it is statistically impossible for him as a supporting actor to win because he was not nominated by the Globes or SAG.

    Christian Bale has his own supporting cast, Ryan Gosling has his own supporting cast and Steve Carell has his own supporting cast, but Brad Pitt is actually a supporting actor in Finn Wittrock’s story, so that was interesting.  But well done to Brad Pitt and Plan B on another Best Picture nomination and maybe win.

    Because it is not a period piece, nor is the sound, cinematography or score remarkable, the ceiling for this movie is six nominations (picture, director, screenplay, editing, actor, supporting actor), so The Big Short is doomed to be underestimated by pundits all season long.  And after downgrading Carell from lead to supporting for Foxcatcher, no way is Carell getting a lead nomination at BAFTA, so that is not going to help the image.

    Although I certainly think that it is possible that it wins, I still have to predict Spotlight.  I will gladly hop over if the supporting actors miss like at SAG and Rachel McAdams misses like at the Globes.  The Big Short is going to do very well at the box office.  In fact, it is just short of Spotlight even though it pretty much only came out a week ago. It has good reviews, important subject matter, an A-list cast and an A CinemaScore.  So it may be something of a populist choice opposite Spotlight.  But Spotlight has done far better in the top ten lists and critically in general.  The Big Short is sadly not really anywhere near the aggregate top ten.  As much as I want The Big Short to win over Spotlight, I am used to my favourites losing and if one does win, I do not want to hear for years afterward about how it unfairly snatched the trophy from more deserving fare.  It is also a boisterous movie, so it will be grating for some or at least be perceived as less artful than Spotlight (although I have my own feelings about the heavyhandedness of that movie).

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    FreemanGriffin
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    #203962

    I would be happy either way, The Big Short or Spotlight (or Room, which is a long shot), winning BP at the Oscars. I love both films.

    I am finding Best Supporting Actor the hardest category to predict. There are so many viable candidates: Christian Bale, Steve Carell, Emory Cohen, Jeff Daniels, Paul Dano, Idris Elba, Walton Goggins, Michael Keaton, Harvey Keitel, Sylvester Stallone, Mark Ruffalo, Mark Rylance, and Jacob Tremblay (as for Tom Hardy in TR, all I will say is please no!) If anybody successfully predicts all five in this category they should win a special prize! (last year, supporting actor was one of three categories I got completely right. The others were BP and Foreign Language Film. I got 4 for 5 in all other categories except 1, in which I only got 3 – this year is much harder to predict because of the depth of worhty nominees).

    The reason I think that Adam McKay will get an Oscar nomination is precisely that he juggles all these different stories and they are ALL terrific! The acting ensemble is phenomenal! I believe the director’s branch will appreciate his achievement.

    Films without Oscar buzz until the last few weeks before nominations usually don’t win ): I am predicting 5 nominations: BP, Director, Supporting Actor – Christian Bale,  Adapted Screenplay and Film Editing.

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    BenitoDelicias
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    #203963

    I don’t think it’s the best movie of the year, nor does it deserve to win Best Picture, but if its Spotlight’s main competition and it becomes  #2, then go ahead and get it The Big Short. 

    I found it too busy and too loud at times and for a film that decided on its own that it needed to treat its main subject with such extreme detail because it’s not that easy to understand, I think it needed to be less annoying with its quick cuts and very loud use of songs.

    However, it’s a very exciting film to watch, something Spotlight could only dream of. The cast is outstanding and it’s such a perfect use of an ensemble that it would be an extremely deserving win at SAG. It’s a rare thing when the B list supporting actors get so much to do. Carrell’s group was amazing in this film, Linklater, Spall and the other one were funny and effectively dramatic, over at In Contention they even did a piece on the guy who played Gosling’s assistant, their relationship was fun too. Even Tomei’s tiny part and Leo’s even tinier part were good. 

    I liked Bale a lot here, but I would vote for a Carrell nomination in supporting before Bale since I liked him the most, he’s believeable/logical as supporting and I don’t see him getting a Lead nod. I agree that he seems more lead than Gosling and Bale and they chickened out of internal competition so they left Bale alone, but Carrell would’ve also worked as supporting I think. 

    I think Adam McKay will get nominated. His type of nomination is something we’ve seen countless times before. Just last year out of nowhere Bennet Miller got a nomination for Foxcatcher. It’s not that hard to imagine McKay getting in if the film is as strong as we think.  

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    Jason Travis
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    #203964

    I agree- Big Short exceeded all my expectations. And Bale and Carell should get acting nods in their respective categories, the latter being very wobbly but it’s a tight year. I loved the movie much more than Spotlight.

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    FilmGuy619
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    #203966

    I really liked Spotlight, but I would be quite ecstatic if this won. I think this one can win over Spotlight because it’s much flashier and more caffeinated. But Spotlight is more restrained and somber. The only thing that The Big Short would need is a Best Director nod to legitimize itself as a threat to win Best Picture. Although if you tell Ben Affleck you need a Director nod to win Best Picture, he’ll probably laugh that offm

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    Riley
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    #203967

    It is interesting because Spotlight and The Big Short have similar premises.  They both deal with mass injustice in recent history, so we know the outcomes.  But The Big Short has a couple of advantages.

    First is that we do not totally know the outcomes.  We know what happened to America and the world in 2008, but there is suspense with regard to how Mark Baum and others fare.  Will their investors shut them down?  Will the banks find a loophole and screw them?  In Spotlight, they set out to uncover a story and then they do that.  There is an occasional rant by Mark Ruffalo or a guilty look by Michael Keaton, but these people are everymen for the most part and do not have really have any personal stakes in the truth that they are revealing.

    Second is how they tell their stories.  Both are sure to get people riled up and Spotlight tries to be subtle about its messages, but it ends up coming across heavyhanded.  The Big Short is in-your-face filmmaking and avoids pretention by embracing that brashness.  It shook me.

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