Best Director 1967

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  • Marcus Snowden (The Artist Formerly Known as msnowden1)
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    #546193

    Who do you guys think deserved to win this award?

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    Halo_Insider
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    #546195

    This is actually a pretty stellar group, but Nichols is an easy choice for me, just edging out Arthur Penn. He sets such an lively atmosphere for The Graduate that keeps the energy rolling with hardly a misstep. And that ending? So powerful, and the kind of thing that continues to resonate with me. It’s a shame that this was the only award that his film managed to win that night, but it may have been the most deserving, so the blow is lessened  a bit.

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    Beau S.
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    #546196

    Nichols and Penn are so far ahead of the rest. Two beyond incredible films.

    Brooks is a distant third.

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    benbraddock
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    #546197

    This was the year that i actually believed the final results
    of the Academy Awards were either fixed or tampered with..

    Mike Nichols won the DGA and was an easy frontrunner
    for best director with his film The Graduate being the front runner
    for best film along with a possible Bonnie and Clyde upset.

    Those were easily the 2 best films of 1967..
    Anne Bancroft gave an iconic performance as Mrs. Robinson
    and after the Golden Globes was considered the front runner
    for best actress..she won the comedy GG, while the drama
    Golden globe was won by Dame Edith Evans in The Whispers
    which also won her the NYFC award..

    Now fast forward to Oscar night….MLK was assasinated
    and the event was cancelled and postponed i believe 2-3 days..

    I found it a bit “shocking” that the 2 racially charged films of that
    year took home the 2 oscars that were expected to go to The Graduate.

    In The Heat of the Night does not hold up well and was , IMO< one of the
    worst best pictures of all time…and Kate Hepburn winning oscar #2 for
    Guess who’s Coming to Dinner still seems unbelievable to me to this day!!

    IMO..The Graduate….the greatest film to ever lose best picture of the year..
    Does everybody see my na,e??? Hahahah

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    JayDF
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    #546198

    1. Mike Nichols, The Graduate 
    2. Arthur Penn, Bonnie and Clyde
    3. Richard Brooks, In Cold Blood 
    4. Norman Jewison, In the Heat of the Night 
    5. Stanley Kramer, Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner 

    Nichols – 100%.  2nd & 3rd can flip flop between Penn & Brooks.  Jewison always 4th.  Kramer for sure always last! 

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    Anthony
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    #546199

    I can’t think of another instance where I would say this would be a worthy feat, but I do think that Mike Nichols should have two back-to-back Director Oscars. He should’ve won for Virginia Woolf and he also deserved his win for The Graduate…and both of those films should’ve won Best Picture.

    Bonnie & Clyde is a strong film and Penn’s work is good and is an easy 2nd place.

    Brooks gets the “Film not nominated in Best Picture” director slot, but he also did a great job and is my 3rd place.

    Jewison and Kramer didn’t really have anything special. Good films, to be sure, but a lot of the weight of those films seemed to rely more on the acting and writing.     

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    KT
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    #546200

    With the Bonnie and Clyde topic in the other forum, I wanted to include my thoughts here.  Bonnie and Clyde stands as the best film of 1967.  It’s a stunning achievement by Arthur Penn, a great director of actors who really shines here.  There are so many sequences I can pick out that are superlative in that film, a classic of American cinema that stands as a pivotal turning point, the beginning of the 1970s.  Look at the opening scene, the editing when Bonnie sees Clyde, dresses, and rushes downstairs; and the provocative next scene when they go into town.  What about the use of montage for “We’re in the Money,” the avant-garde dream-like sequence when Bonnie returns to her home, the scene in the field as the cloud darkens overhead (which I think unconsciously parallels the Vertigo scene in the bookstore, the dark shading by Hitchcock), and of course the finale.  There is so much to mine in the film.  Why Clyde is childlike, the use of photography as a motif, the execution of the action sequences, the D.W. character.  Penn may be at his best here, and Beatty, Dunaway, and Hackman are exemplary. 

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