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Favorite Disney Animated Film: Part 3 (1950-1967)

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  • Daniel B.
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    Nov 22nd, 2010
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    #548727

    Of the last 8 full-length animated features released by Walt Disney Animation Studios that Walt was personally involved with, which is your favourite?

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    Tyler The Awesome Guy
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    Nov 19th, 2011
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    #548729

    The Jungle Book is one of my favourite Disney films, period.

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    KyleBailey
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    Nov 15th, 2013
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    #548730

    It was tough to choose between Peter Pan and Alice in Wonderland but I think Peter Pan is just more of an overall perfect movie. 

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    tonorlo
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    Oct 4th, 2011
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    #548731


    “Cinderella”
    is perilously close to perfect, neither wobbling under
    unnecessary largesse or gasping for more substance. It’s truly remarkable
    how a story that can be told in all of five minutes gets such an invigorating
    workout here, and the film never once lags during its seventy-five minute
    running time.


    Everything
    about the film is in exceptionally good balance. The muted background designs, evocative
    score and an underrated but very clever script beautifully abet some
    of the most fully realized characters of the Walt Era, all of whom are limned
    with just the right restraint to make the story work. The vocal performances
    that are matched to this breathtaking character animation are positively
    remarkable.


    Look at the leading lady. Really,
    look at her. Cinderella may appear a rather passive personality at
    first glance, but the film reveals her throughout as a young woman of
    quiet intelligence, respectable without being a beacon of
    full-tilt saintliness or martyrdom. The film smartly underlines her
    willingness to suffer not always gladly- and yet look at the dignity
    bestowed upon her as she quietly cuts Lady Tremaine’s curdling “But of
    course there will be other times…” with a stiff-upper lip “Yes.
    Good night.” This Cinderella is, as in many
    other iterations, a dreamer, but she’s also pragmatic. She clearly
    sees and feels the injustice of her situation, and while she bends nobly,
    she’s no wilting flower either. She asserts herself against the mockey of her
    stepsisters and the hauteur of her stepmother without any florid
    display of emotionalism, but with a simple, practical assertion of fact:
    “Well, why not? After all, I’m still a member of the family…” This
    kind of maturity didn’t exist in a young Disney heroine for another 41 years, until
    Belle came along. And when Cinderella does break, it isn’t because she hasn’t
    tried to better her situtation. She has tried, and the universe has slapped her
    in the face for it. She’s worthy of our sympathy, and more crucial in the
    overall arc of the film, she’s worthy of the breaks she gets.


    The
    other characters that adorn the story are no less vivid (once we subtract the
    desultory-but-essential Prince from the equation- even Walt never figured out
    what to do with these guys). The pompous King and the nebbish Grand Duke spark
    off each other brilliantly, compared to the airless “camaraderie”
    between the similarly patterned Herbert and Stefan of “Sleeping
    Beauty” later in the decade. Jaq and Gus and the chatty menagerie of
    mice are effective audience surrogates, and has the creamy delight of a Verna
    Felton cameo ever been more funny and truly touching than her peerless Fairy
    Godmother? And on the flip side, the distilled vinegar of Eleanor Audley may
    have been seen to more flamboyant effect as Maleficent, but her Lady Tremaine
    arguably matches that later creation for chilling actorly gravitas. Much of the
    most succulent dialogue in the film goes to Audley, and while she delivers
    wicked little paragraphs with cunning malice, “And don’t forget the
    garden…See that Lucifer gets his bath,” the true diamonds of her
    performance come in the two- and three syllable one-liners, which she delivers
    with the crisp efficiency of an executioner. “Come here…” “So
    it does.” “I said if.” And the most lacerating of all…
    “Good night.”


    Throughout
    the film, the balance between whimsy and drama, magic and recognizable reality
    are deftly mixed together, and thus this most oft-told fantasy resonates with
    real stakes and the souls of filmmakers who are near the apex of their craft,
    and are not only confident in what they’re doing, but they believe in it.
    “Cinderella” often gets brushed aside for its comparative lack of
    technical virtuosity, but its very modesty adds to its charm rather than
    suggesting lacking elements. Furthermore, it not only holds up well against the
    more august Disney classics, but it holds up brilliantly among the best films
    of 1950, a none-too-shabby year for Hollywood annals.


    All
    of the other remaining contenders of this era have good to great things in
    them, though several fall far short of being truly outstanding films. There are
    wonderful things to be enjoyed in “Lady and the Tramp” and the sheer
    effort of “Sleeping Beauty” remains laudable, but this is an easy
    call for me. Out of this lineup, “Cinderella.”


     


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    Entertain-me
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    #548732

    1. Lady and the Tramp
    2. Cinderella
    3. Peter Pan
    4. Alice in Wonderland
    5. The Jungle Book
    6. Sleeping Beauty
    7. The Sword in the Stone
    8. One Hundred and One Dalmatians 

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    RobertoTerra
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    Jun 25th, 2011
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    #548733

    1. One Hundred and One Dalmatians 
    2. Alice in Wonderland
    3. Cinderella
    4. Peter Pan
    5. The Jungle Book
    6. Lady and the Tramp
    7. The Sword in the Stone
    8. Sleeping Beauty

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    KT
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    Sep 20th, 2012
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    #548734

    For my money, Sleeping Beauty is the most gorgeously animated Disney film of all time.

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    babypook
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    #548735
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    Daniel B.
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    Nov 22nd, 2010
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    #548736

    Here is how I would rank the candidates:

    1. The Jungle Book (my all-time favourite animated movie) 
    2. Alice in Wonderland
    3. The Sword in the Stone
    4. Lady and the Tramp
    5. Cinderella
    6. Peter Pan
    7. 101 Dalmatians
    8. Sleeping Beauty
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    JayDF
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    #548737

    All 8 are wonderful entertainment, 1st 3 on my ranking are among my top 100 fav films ever.

    1. Sleeping Beauty
    2. The Jungle Book
    3. Alice In Wonderland

    4. 101 Dalmations
    5. Peter Pan
    6. Lady and the Tramp
    7. Cinderella
    8. The Sword In the Stone

     

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    benjaminmoreno
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    #548738

    My  favourite cartoons are:
    1)Pokemon
    2)Cindrella
    3)barbie
    4)Osworld
    These are my favourite it, there 3D character animation is too good and I am happy to watch it. These remindes our childhood.

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    Noé
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    Feb 20th, 2014
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    #548739

    1. Alice In Wonderland
    2. Sleeping Beauty
    3. One Hundred and One Dalmatians
    4. Peter Pan
    5. The Jungle Book
    6. The Sword in the Stone
    7. Cinderella
    8. Lady and the Tramp

    But really this era is one of the very best in Disney history, all great movies! 
     

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