a question about TV Credits?

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  • Boidiva02
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    #237912

    What exactly is the difference between an Associate Producer and a Cooridinating (or supervising) Producer? are they basically the same thing?

    What is the basic function of an Associate Producer and a Supersiving (or cooridinating) Producer and how do they differ from that of somebody that is credited as simply a producer (or credited under Produced By:)

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    Riley
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    #237914

    Producer titles usually mean little other than how long someone has worked on a television show and how good their agent is at negotiating, i.e. there is no reason to think that a supervising producer is doing more than a producer.  At the bottom of the ladder is the associate producer and at the top is executive producer.

    Executive producer
    Co-executive producer
    Supervising producer
    Producer/produced by
    Co-producer
    Associate producer

    The titles do correpond to pay grades.  If someone joins a show as an producer, they will probably get a promotion roughly every year until they reach executive producer, although they may skip levels.  Executive, co-executive, supervising and producer are always in the on-screen main credits, but co-producer and associate vary being in the main or end credits, depending on the show.

    Consulting producer is another credited position (credited before or after supervising producer), but exists outside of the hierarchy and refers to a producer who works part-time.  This is often used for writers who may have recently had a baby and need shorter hours, but still work on the show.  Line producer also kind of exists outside of the hierarchy and refers to the person in charge of physical production; however, not all shows use this title.  On Lost, Jean Higgins was often referred to as the show’s “line producer”, but was never actually credited as such.

    Because writers run television shows, they often receive producer titles, despite not doing much other than write.  If actually all that they do is write, they get a “staff writer” credit.  If they do a bit more of if it has been a year and time for a new contract, they will be promoted to “story editor”, then “executive story editor”, then “associate producer” as they enter the normal hierarchy.  But again, they can skip levels.  These titles are rarely in the main credits, but are sometimes.

    Producers that actually work on the set often get a “produced by” credit instead of “producer”.

    The creator is almost always an executive producer from the first episode.  Exceptions occur when the creator has no experience running a television show and the network brings in an established television producer to run it instead.  The creator will then be credited as co-executive producer (and probably executive producer for the second season) or executive producer.

    Showrunner is not a credited position, but very much exists and applies to the person or two people who are at the very top of decision-making and running the show.

    Within title groups (producer, executive producer, etc.), people are generally credited in the order of whoever joined the show first and if people joined the show first, it will follow the order that they were credited in the first episode, which would have been determined by whoever ran the pilot or whoever was most famous.

    If a producer leaves a show, they might be credited as a “consultant” or “executive consultant” usually as a courtesy for the work that they did on the series before they left.  If they were an executive producer when they left and their production company still funds the show, this person will probably retain their credit, even if they never actually work on it again.

    If a show revolves around a single character, that person will often negotiate for a “producer” title in their contract.  Once they get a “producer” credit, they usually enter the ladder-climbing game and will probably be promoted every year that they continue on the show until they get to “executive producer”.  Sometimes, a secondary star like Alec Baldwin in 30 Rock will get a producer title.

    The PGA gives best series producing nominations to whomever is actively producing the show, i.e. the stars and executive producers who left the show yet are still credited never receive nominations.

    The Emmys give nominations to all credited executive, co-executive, supervising and producers, except in extremely rare cases in which even they realize that someone being credited has never actually done any producing work whatsoever, like with Michael C. Hall for Dexter.

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    Boidiva02
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    #237915

    Thank you for that informative and detailed information. It helped tremendously. 

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