Is there a minimum number of episodes needed to compete?

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  • Boidiva02
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    #252126

    I’m sure there is an mininmum number of episodes a series must have in order to compete for Emmy, my question is what is that number? I know that Girls only produced 10 episodes and VEEP only produced 8 episodes.   These seem like such a low number.

    Does anybody know how many episodes a series needs to compete in the Drama or Comedy Series categories?

    I mean with 8 episodes only it’s not much longer than a mini-series.  It’s actually fewer episodes than “Missing” aired in which Ashley Judd is nominated in the Actress-Mini Series or Movie category.

    American Horror Story produced 12 episodes and is competing in the Mini-Series category, but shows like VEEP and GIRLS with fewer episodes are competing in the main category?

    so what is the limit?

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    TV12
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    #252128

    How many do you submit? 6. 6 is the minimum. It’s in the rule book

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    Boidiva02
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    #252129

    No. What I’m asking is how many episodes need to air to be considered eligible for Emmy consideration?  Is there a mininmum number of episodes a series must air to be considered for competition?

    For example can a series air three episodes and compete or is there a specific number a series must reach before they can compete?

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    Conrado
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    #252130

    A series must air at least 6 episodes if I’m informed correctly. That is why Sherlock, which produced only three episodes must compete submiting one of its episodes as a Movie.

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    Boidiva02
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    #252131

    Thank you!    and is it up to producers to decide if they want to enter the mini-series/movie race or compete in the Drama/Comedy category?

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    Daniel Montgomery
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    #252132

    Emmy’s rules to qualify as a miniseries are as follows:

    Miniseries: A limited-run series with a “created by” credit CANNOT enter as a miniseries
    unless the producer for the limited run series applies for and receives entitlement to dual
    qualification, i.e. qualification in more than one category, because of an affirmative
    determination by the Awards Committee that the limited run series has elements of both
    drama series and miniseries categories.

    A miniseries is based on a single theme or story line, which is resolved within the piece. In a single
    awards year all of the parts must be presented under the same title and have continuity of production
    supervision.

    A miniseries consists of two or more episodes with a total running time of at least four broadcast
    hours (at least 150 program minutes).

    That comes directly from Emmy’s rules, which can be found here:

    http://www.emmys.tv/sites/emmys.tv/files/pte12_rulesandproced_rev4.pdf  

    What that basically means is that if a program doesn’t technically qualify as a miniseries based on those rules, it can apply for permission and the TV Academy can determine whether it should be eligible to be considered there. That’s how “Downton Abbey,” “The Hour,” “Missing,” “The River,” and “Luther” have qualified for consideration in the last two years despite not adhering to one or all of those standards.

    Consider the example of “Luther” last year: It aired 6 episodes in its first season (enough to have qualified as a drama series), it had a “created by” credit (which signifies a continuing series, as opposed to “written by,” which typically indicates a self-contained story), it wasn’t based on a single theme or storyline (there were multiple stand-alone mysteries within those six episodes), and its storyline was not resolved within the piece (it ended on a cliffhanger which was paid off in season two). It was deemed eligible to compete as a miniseries despite not meeting any of the above requirements for a miniseries.

    This year, all the same are true for “Luther” except for the fact that it only aired 4 episodes (not enough to qualify as a drama series), so if it couldn’t compete as a miniseries it wouldn’t have been able to compete anywhere.

    “Sherlock” got around the eligibility problem by submitting one self-contained episode as a movie. I’m not sure they really needed to do that, though, because if they had entered all three episodes as a miniseries, it wouldn’t even have been the most lax exception the TV Academy allowed this year.

    That would probably be either “The Hour” (6 episodes, “created by” credit, not resolved within the piece, renewed for a second season) or ABC’s cancelled shows “Missing” and “The River” (more than 6 episodes apiece, “created by” credit, and I know at least “The River” didn’t resolve its storyline).

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    Boidiva02
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    #252133

    So basically they have a way to skirt the rules whenever they feel like it.

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    Ryan Earle
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    #252134

    The River and Missing didn’t resolve their storylines, BUT the fact they are cancelled does kind of mean in a way that they are resolved or are as resolved as they will ever be seeing as how they won’t be renewed. So, in a way they are legit mini-series.

    Luther, this year does qualify as a mini-series since it only aired 4 episodes.

    The Hour, I believe, got approved for the mini-series category because it had 6 episodes. I believe the Academy grants shows that only air 6 episodes entry into the mini-series category because they are right on the border line. I mean, for the series tapes if they were in the drama series category they would have to submit all their episodes, which is kind of unfair to the other shows that have 7 or more because they have to leave certain episodes out. Think about it, if you were voting and you saw an entire season from start to finish versus watching episodes 1, 2, 5, 7, 11,13 of a show that don’t exactly show you everything that happened, wouldn’t you go for the full season? 

    I think they do this so it doesn’t create unfairness in the voting. Just my opinion.

    Now, American Horror Story is the one that kind of broke it all for me. It had like 10 or more episodes this year and should have been in the drama series category. AHS is the one, I believe, that committed category fraud. 

     

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    Ryan Earle
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    #252135

    I believe at 585 minutes long, “American Horror Story” is the longest “Mini-Series” to be nominated. Roots was only 573 minutes long, but again that was an actual mini-series, where as AHS is coming back for a second season. Does this mean season two is eligible as a mini-series as well? If it does get nominated in Mini-Series will they say “American Horror Story season 2”? lol

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    Daniel Montgomery
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    #252136

    It’s more like getting a favorable (but questionable) call from the ref.

    With television storytelling formats in constant flux, I don’t mind re-evaluating the rules from time to time and making fair exceptions. Better for a show like “Luther” to be eligible as a miniseries than nowhere at all this year.

    My main problem is with inconsistency. Based on the exceptions that have already been made, the 1st season of “The Walking Dead” and the last season of “Men of a Certain Age” should have been allowed as miniseries. Other cancelled one-season shows like “Luck” and “Awake” should have been allowed as miniseries. If you’re going to make an exception for one, why not the other. 

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    Daniel Montgomery
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    #252137

    I believe at 585 minutes long, “American Horror Story” is the longest “Mini-Series” to be nominated. Roots was only 573 minutes long, but again that was an actual mini-series, where as AHS is coming back for a second season. Does this mean season two is eligible as a mini-series as well? If it does get nominated in Mini-Series will they say “American Horror Story season 2”? lol

    I believe “Taken,” the Steven Spielberg-produced miniseries, was actually 20 hours long — less when you subtract the commercials, but I think well more than “American Horror Story.”

    “AHS” actually doesn’t bother me that much. It told one story and that story ended. It’s iffy because it’s coming back for a second season and many of the same actors are coming back, just in different roles, but it’s a borderline case I can live with. 

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    Daniel Montgomery
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    #252138

    The River and Missing didn’t resolve their storylines, BUT the fact they are cancelled does kind of mean in a way that they are resolved or are as resolved as they will ever be seeing as how they won’t be renewed. So, in a way they are legit mini-series.

    So were “Awake” and “Luck.” Neither were entered as miniseries. I don’t know if “Awake” tried, but the TV Academy made a statement that “Luck” would not be allowed to compete as a miniseries because it didn’t have a concrete beginning, middle, and end. Why allow the ABC shows but not the others. By that standard, “Terra Nova” and “Alcatraz” should be miniseries too.

    The Hour, I believe, got approved for the mini-series category because it had 6 episodes. I believe the Academy grants shows that only air 6 episodes entry into the mini-series category because they are right on the border line. I mean, for the series tapes if they were in the drama series category they would have to submit all their episodes, which is kind of unfair to the other shows that have 7 or more because they have to leave certain episodes out. Think about it, if you were voting and you saw an entire season from start to finish versus watching episodes 1, 2, 5, 7, 11,13 of a show that don’t exactly show you everything that happened, wouldn’t you go for the full season? 

    I think they do this so it doesn’t create unfairness in the voting. Just my opinion. 

    “Men of a Certain Age” aired its last 6 episodes last summer. It was entered as a drama series. “The Walking Dead” aired 6 episodes in its first season. Also entered as a drama series. I don’t know if either applied for consideration as miniseries, but I don’t think anyone argued they should have been in the miniseries lineup.

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    EmmyLoser
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    #252139

    My first thought was that American Horror Story was a huge category fraud, but actually I agree Daniel that it’s not that bothersome.  The second season will be completely removed from the first, and the fact that actors are returning in new roles kind of legitimizes its mini-series status further for me.  If they subtitle subsequent seasons (season two could be AHS: Mental), it’ll seem like even less of a fraud.

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    sorcery
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    #252140

    In 1994, Homicide: Life on the Street‘s truncated, 4-episode second season received a nomination for Outstanding Guest Actor (Robin Williams). I wonder if it was also allowed to submit in Outstanding Drama Series that year? 

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    TV12
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    #252141

    ^^^A lot of rules have changed since 1994.

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