Isn’t the episode voting system unfair when co stars are in 1 category?

Home // Forums // Television // Isn’t the episode voting system unfair when co stars are in 1 category?

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 27 total)
Created
4 years ago
Last Reply
4 years ago
26
replies
235
views
15
users
4
4
3
  • montana82
    Participant
    Joined:
    Sep 14th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #299499

    One thing occured to me last night while rewatching the Veep submission “Running”.  I think on it’s own I’d consider voting for Tony Hale to win.  But Ty Burrel and Ed O’Neill are all over a total of 3 tapes that it’s such an advantage I can’t help but put them above Hale.

    I also rewatched Krakowski and Bowen and added up their screen time.  Krakowski had 8 minutes and 37 seconds of screen time.  Bowen had 8 minutes and 33 seconds in her tape.

    Man that’s pretty equal no?  Whoever wins we are going to get a fair assessment of who was really the best right?

    Oh yeah.  Vergara’s episode.  Bowen had 8 minutes and 40 seconds of screen time. More opportunities for screen time, for impact, for range, to make an impression on voters.  A close fight gets dramatically tipped to one side as the screen time doubles.

    This is probably why Steve Carrell lost to Jim Parsons because of Galecki being there.

    How exactly is this fair?  Don’t these nominees who get nominated with a co star have a huge huge advantage by basically getting 2 or 3 episodes submitted to judges?  Doesn’t this have to change?

    They need to A. edit down scenes to include only the nominee  B. have nominees submit 2 episodes  or C. instructions to voters to consider that advantage when voting and only vote based on the nominees tape, not their co stars.

    I think you can make the case a lot of the winners in these categories are not being won fair and square.

    Reply
    CanadianFan
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jul 23rd, 2012
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #299501

    *Sigh*

    Julie Bowen had 2 episodes. Jane Krakowski had 2 episodes, no? If anything, place the blame on the 30 Rock writers for underusing her…

    Also, how would having the nominees submit 2 episodes change anything? Bowen would now feature in 4 episodes compared to most of the other contenders, who would be featured in two. I’m pretty sure your ‘C’ solution is implicit; voters are keenly aware of this advantage and probably take it into account.

    In short, nothing needs to change. There will always be screentime advantages; some shows used to devote nearly an entire episode once a year to a supporting character just to win an Emmy. Would you be outraged if Jessica Walter was allowed to submit her episode? She probably has a half hour of material, doubling what Bowen has (even with Vergara’s tape). There is no easy way around this. The Emmy’s have the best voting system from an entertainment awards body, but it is not perfect.

    The bigger issue here is the tape submission system itself. Obviously, actors and actresses who do consistently great work over a season will lose to one phenomenal episode. Is that fair? No. Is it going to change? Nope. Submitting episodes is a convenient way around time constraints… but if I were an Emmy voter, I would vote for Bryan Cranston over Damian Lewis this year, purely based off of their season of work (I’ve seen every episode). 

    None of this is fair. 

    ReplyCopy URL
    montana82
    Participant
    Joined:
    Sep 14th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #299502

    True.

    But getting 3 episodes to 1 in supporting actor?

    I just don’t see how that’s fair to the guys flying solo.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Emmyfan
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 26th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #299503

    There are instances in which someone takes down 2 to  3 nominees from one show and below are examples:

    John Larroquette from Night Court took down the guys from Cheers from 1985 to 1988 and in 1988 there were three nominees.

    Rhea Perlman from Cheers took down the Keisha Knight-Pulliam and Lisa Bonet in Supporting Actress Comedy in 1986.

    Dana Delaney took down Jill Eikenberry and Susan Dey from L.A.Law in Lead Actress Drama in 1989.

    Candace Bergen took down Bea Arthur, Betty White and Rue McClanahan for Lead Actress Comedy in 1989.

    Doris Roberts took down Kim Cattrall and Cynthia Nixon from Sex & The City for Supporting Actress Comedy in 2002 and 2003.

    Ray Romano took down Matthew Perry and Matt LeBlanc from Friends in Lead Actor Comedy in 2002.

    The cast of ER was taken down several times in the Lead Actress, Lead Actor, Supporting Actor and Supporting Actress Drama from a lone nominee from another show.

    I see the point that you are bring up, but it goes both ways as far as multiple nominees from one show in a category                      

    ReplyCopy URL
    dude93
    Member
    Joined:
    Mar 31st, 2013
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #299504

    Most of the people on these boards just seem to have a huge chip on their shoulder about the success of Modern Family. I think that’s why you’re complaining. If the supporting actor category had 8,000 people from Arrested Development, no one would say anything because there is a fascination with that show that I simply don’t understand. 

    ReplyCopy URL
    Halo_Insider
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jul 3rd, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #299505

    There are instances in which someone takes down 2 to  3 nominees from one show and below are examples:

    John Larroquette from Night Court took down the guys from Cheers from 1985 to 1988 and in 1988 there were three nominees.

    Rhea Perlman from Cheers took down the Keisha Knight-Pulliam and Lisa Bonet in Supporting Actress Comedy in 1986.

    Dana Delaney took down Jill Eikenberry and Susan Dey from L.A.Law in Lead Actress Drama in 1989.

    Candace Bergen took down Bea Arthur, Betty White and Rue McClanahan for Lead Actress Comedy in 1989.

    Doris Roberts took down Kim Cattrall and Cynthia Nixon from Sex & The City for Supporting Actress Comedy in 2002 and 2003.

    Ray Romano took down Matthew Perry and Matt LeBlanc from Friends in Lead Actor Comedy in 2002.

    The cast of ER was taken down several times in the Lead Actress, Lead Actor, Supporting Actor and Supporting Actress Drama from a lone nominee from another show.

    I see the point that you are bring up, but it goes both ways as far as multiple nominees from one show in a category                      

    Regarding the Supporting categories, did they have to submit full episodes at that time, or did they just have their time edited down to just their performances? I thought it was only in the last several years that nominees submitted complete tapes.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Choice Chayawat
    Participant
    Joined:
    Jul 2nd, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #299506

    Burrell’s win and both of Stonestreet’s wins resulted from their strong submitted tapes, regardless of the other MF guys’ tapes.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Matt Morse
    Participant
    Joined:
    Dec 1st, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #299507

    It’s not a perfect system.  Not even close.  But I think some things even out.

    Yes they can have multiple episodes submitted if nominated with a co-star but then what about SNL which is basically 3 episodes in length compared to a half hour sitcom?  

    Sure the Modern Family guys have 3 episodes but Hader has more screen time even when you combine “their” tapes.  (Maybe?  I didn’t do the math but I remember some long sketches in there.)   Hale and Driver are the only ones disadvantaged here.  Driver wasn’t going to win no matter what.

    And honestly a little Hale goes a long way so his character being limited to 30 minutes is actually probably a good thing for him.

    (I love Tony Hale but even in Arrested Development his best scenes were a minute or two long.  Too much and his schtick gets annoying.  Like a more subtle Will Ferrel…) He works best by dropping in a scene and blowing it out of the water then getting out.

    ReplyCopy URL
    dude93
    Member
    Joined:
    Mar 31st, 2013
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #299508

    Hale has the same issue as Krakowski unfortunately in that screen time is limited. But I’m sure it’s happened before – a role with a short amount of screen time winning the Emmy – can anyone share some examples on this perhaps that could back up a win for Jenna Maroney?

    ReplyCopy URL
    Emmyfan
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 26th, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #299509

    Alec Baldwin’s win in 2008 with the submission of Rosemary’s Baby had little screentime for him.

    Allison Janney’s win in 2002 in Lead Actress Drama for The West Wing had little screentime.

      

    ReplyCopy URL
    dude93
    Member
    Joined:
    Mar 31st, 2013
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #299510

    Was Baldwin’s win with Rosemary’s Baby still a good tape (in other words, could he win this year with a bad submission/limited screen time)? 

    I know his first win was for that Spanish soap opera episode which was a knockout. 

    ReplyCopy URL
    Renaton
    Member
    Joined:
    Jun 4th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #299511

    Rosemary’s Baby was much more of a knock out than Generalissimo. I remember thinking he was a mortal lock to win. The only people not predicting him were Carrell fanboys and people who thought they weren’t over Shaloub yet.

    ReplyCopy URL
    bondzzz
    Participant
    Joined:
    May 27th, 2011
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #299512

    I was actually quite surprised that Baldwin hadn’t had much screentime when I was watching his tape again for my game. But then that one particular scene was so hilarious that I don’t think that screentime hurt him at all and eventually that scene pushed him over the edge for the win, I think.

    ReplyCopy URL
    Matt Morse
    Participant
    Joined:
    Dec 1st, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #299513

    Alec Baldwin only had a few real scenes in “Rosemary’s Baby.”  The kicker was he had the first scene, that big knock out therapy scene and that last scene.   He’s the first character on screen and the last as they fade out.

    What is interesting to note is he played such a supporitng role in that episode.  He didn’t have his own story.  He held Liz’s hand as she got a glimpse of her future in Carrie Fischer.  He navigated Tracy though his daddy issues.  He served as a sounding board for two other strong characters.  He didn’t have his own arc which is something I’ve been hearing a lot about recently.  But never the less he won lead with it.

    His therapy scene was huge but that last scene he just got to deliever line after line of brilliance with brilliance.
    “Never go with a hippie to a second location.”
    “If you make enought money you can pay someone to look at you naked.”

    His more applicable to Krakowski here who has small but brilliant scenes.  Maybe not as good at his therapy scene.  But I’d like to think enough for a supporting actress win…

    …Sigh it’s going to be Bowen again…

     

    ReplyCopy URL
    SkyLight
    Participant
    Joined:
    Nov 3rd, 2010
    Topics:
    Posts:
    #299514

    Was Baldwin’s win with Rosemary’s Baby still a good tape (in other words, could he win this year with a bad submission/limited screen time)? 

    I know his first win was for that Spanish soap opera episode which was a knockout. 

    His first win was for Rosemary’s baby which was in season 2. Generalissimo was season 3.

    ReplyCopy URL
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 27 total)
Reply To: Isn’t the episode voting system unfair when co stars are in 1 category?

You can use BBCodes to format your content.
Your account can't use Advanced BBCodes, they will be stripped before saving.

Similar Topics
Reis - Aug 19, 2017
Television
hats-off - Aug 19, 2017
Television