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Name Discrepancy in Writing and Directing at the Emmys

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  • CanadianFan
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    #357137

    When voters are given those giant nomination ballots, the names of the directors are given, but not the writers. 

    I think this helps explain a few of the surprises this year. Would Soderbergh have been nominated if his name was omitted from the pilot of ‘The Knick’?

    Similarly, Jeremy Podeswa, an Emmy-nominated director (“Unbowed, Unbent, Unbroken”), garnered a nomination over the much-hyped “Hardhome” by relative unknown Miguel Sapochnik for ‘Game of Thrones’.

    On the writing side, due to the names being hidden, “Five-O” (‘Better Call Saul’) was nominated over Vince Gilligan’s “Uno”. As I understand it, “Five-O” was Gordon Smith’s first credited script! There is no chance he would have been nominated if the names of the writers were published with the submissions.

    Do you think anything should be done about this? 

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    Tonbone
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    #357139

    Well I was hoping to see Better Call Saul, House of Cards, or Orange is The New Black would get nominated for directing but I don’t think name-checking is the reason for that not happening. 

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    Denis
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    #357140

    I honestly don’t think “Five-O” applies to this situation, it is just a script that screams emmy, I’m not saying it is perfect, but it is still very good for at least being a nominee. Also Gordon Smith worked as writers assistant on “Breaking Bad”, he probably have pitched a few things here and there, after all, probably learned from the best there is.

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    Atypical
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    #357141

    I’d either include all the names across the board on the ballot or exclude them. Doing both has always seemed wrong to me. At least in writing, the nominees feel more genuine to me. Gordon Smith earned that damn nomination fair and square. “Five-O” is a better writing nominee than “Uno” would have been, and if anything, Vince Gilligan should have garnered a directing nomination for it instead. Voters had the episode titles and descriptions on the ballot, at least. They had to find that episode to watch or know about when they didn’t have to. As for directing, I’d hope to give the directors more credit than just picking Steven Soderbergh just b/c he’s Steven Soderbergh. He did stellar work on “Method & Madness” that should be acknowledged. Or Tim Van Patten for being a bigwig in the directing branch and recent winner. Just for openness, I’d include all the names on the ballot.

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    CanadianFan
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    #357142

    I’d go the opposite direction and hide the names during the nominating process (like the writing category), and make them visible when selecting winners.

    I agree with you that the writing nominees feel more genuine.

     

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    FrozenBarbie
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    #357143

    Isn’t it kind of silly to hide names on ballots, when it’s possible that voters watched the show(s) and know who the writers/directors are, and if they didn’t know already, they can easily find out on the interwebs?  I don’t get it.

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    CanadianFan
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    #357144

    Why do the names matter though? Shouldn’t the work speak for itself? 

    I understand including the names when selecting winners, because they deserve to be recognized. However, I do think that including the names of the directors in the nomination phase has altered some of the results. 

    The point of not disclosing the names is that it would prevent lazy name-checking of the higher-profile writers or directors.  

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    AviChristiaans
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    #357145

    I don’t understand the thread.

    So Soderbergh (“Method and Madness – The Knick’) was only nominated because of his name, a blatant name-check. The one aspect and acclaim “The Knick” has been known for and has gotten universally is its directing triumph, yet he is the one that doesn’t derserve it? Does that mean Lesli Linka Glatter was also name checked? Because she is the most high profile female director working today on television.

    Compared to say, “Person to Person” directed by beloved Matthew Weiner? Or Orange is the New Black‘s “We Have Manners. We’re Polite” by Constantine Makris?

    Where does that leave Tim Van Patten?  Vince Gilligan last year? I swear i did not see any thread calling him out.
    They werent name checked?  They deserved those nominations? Even though they are the two biggest, often nominated name checked directors on the ballot each year? And Steve Shill in 2010? Lesli Linka Glatter? Michael Cuesta?

    It’s either the names are left off or they are prominantly displayed. But when people get nominations, name checking will still be thrown around?

    I don’t get it.

    Yes. Soderberg would have gotten in. So would Glatter and both those Game of Throwns episodes. The most talked about and controversial episode included.

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    CanadianFan
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    #357146

    I love Soderbergh’s direction in ‘The Knick’. Nowhere in this thread did I claim his nomination was a result of name-checking.

    The purpose of the thread is to discuss why the Emmy ballots only contain the names of directors, and not writers, and if that should change. 

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    Deniz Sisman
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    #357147

    It also doesn’t make sense to award the writer’s individually. This is not like the same situation with directors. Writers group of one show decides everything about the scenario together before it starts, I mean everything, who will get caught, who will die, which path they will go that season and then they partake every episode, in turn.
    Even Gordon Smith admitted to GoldDerby that nothing about the episode was his personal idea, it was a group work, he just wrote the script, so why only award him?

    I understand this rule was made up solely to simplify to rate the candidates quality but I could come up with an idea that every show can submit an episode which they think it is their best, like the actors, and in the end the award would go to whole team, not just one particular person. This also would brought diversity into nominees when one single show doesn’t nominated four times in one year.

    It’s bullshit when you think about it, Vince Gilligan doesn’t have a single Writing Emmy for a show that he has created and probably has participated on every singular episode while Moira Walley-Beckett has one.
    When a non Gold-derby viewer searches the Emmy records for Writing, he/she would see Breaking Bad’s writing has become good only  in its last two seasons and the writers branch didn’t embrace the show before. And Homeland was a two-times better written show than B.B. I mean, what the hell?

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