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No Miniseries Won an Emmy This Year

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  • Riley
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    #336080

    I wrote this six weeks ago, but it only went up on the site yesterday at http://www.goldderby.com/news/7299/american-horror-story-freak-show-sherlock-tv-entertainment-news-318295740-story.html:

    The movie/miniseries categories at the Emmys have become a hodgepodge of programs
    that may not qualify as drama series, but are not exactly movies or miniseries
    either.  The rise of anthology series has
    led to dozens of nominations for American
    Horror Story
    , while short seasons of continuing dramas like Luther and cancelled series like 2011’s Missing have also fared well.  The dominance in the movie/mini categories by
    shows that are not considered movies or miniseries outside the context of
    awards was apparent in the nominations this year and even more pronounced in
    the wins.

    In fact, 2014 marks the first time since 1969—when there were no
    segregated movie/mini categories—that no self-contained single-season
    miniseries won a single award.  Movies
    performed only slightly better, as The
    Normal Heart
    took Outstanding Movie and Movie/Mini Makeup from sixteen
    nominations.  Traditional Outstanding
    Miniseries nominees Bonnie & Clyde
    and The White Queen were shut out, as
    were Outstanding Movie nominees Killing
    Kennedy
    , Muhammad Ali’s Greatest Fight
    and The Trip to Bountiful.

    Movies nominated in other categories were Anna Nicole, Burton and
    Taylor
    , Clear History, Flowers in the Attic, House of Versace and Return to Zero.  Miniseries were Dancing on the Edge, Fleming: The Man Who Would Be Bond, Klondike, Mob  City and The Spoils of Babylon.  Altogether, programs that were classified as
    movies and miniseries for the Emmys were nominated in twenty-one categories and
    won seventeen.  (Art Direction, Original
    Main Title Theme Music, Prosthetic Makeup and Special and Visual Effects in a
    Supporting Role were catch-all categories in which miniseries and movies competed
    directly with dramas and nonfiction.)

    The awards were split between anthology series American Horror Story and Fargo
    and continuing dramas Sherlock and Treme that had short seasons.  As the movie and miniseries categories ostensibly
    no longer recognize movies and miniseries, the Television Academy would be wise
    to restructure or rename them.  The
    Golden Globes are considering a Best Limited Series moniker, which the Emmys
    last employed in 1985.

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    Placeholder
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    #336082

    Issues like this are why the Emmys will never be taken seriously.

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    CanadianFan
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    Jul 23rd, 2012
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    #336083

    They really need to change the rules. Their voting system is pretty good — especially compared to the other awards shows — but they need to work on strict category classification (I love you, Shameless, but no…).

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    Somnambulist
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    #336084

    How are limited and miniseries judged by voters? Are they required to make episodic submissions? I see that some of the continuing and limited series opt to submit a single installment as a TV movie (like Sherlock did with “His Last Vow”).

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    Riley
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    #336085

    They make episodic submissions in the technical categories, but submit the entire thing for the program and acting categories.  No one is sure how Sherlock is able to get away with calling itself a movie instead of a miniseries.  In the writing category, the entire thing is submitted if it is by a single writer or writing team.  If episodes have different writers, they are submitted separately in writing.  No one is sure how Noah Hawley submitted only the pilot in writing when he wrote all of Fargo.

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    CanadianFan
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    #336086

    This whole ‘rate Riley one-star for everything’ is getting really old. 

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    jf123
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    #336087

    I don’t get why everybody is getting all upset that AHS and Fargo are submitting theirselves as a miniseries. They each have self contained storylines and have nothing in common (except for cast and crew) with other seasons. But I think they should rename the category Outstanding Limited Series

    But I agree that it is unbelievable that Sherlock is submitting itself as a TV Movie.   

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    Riley
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    #336088

    The issue in this thread at least is not that American Horror Story and Fargo are submitting themselves as miniseries because you can make the case that that is the best category for them; it is that they are not generally considered miniseries outside the context of awards.  And since they have now completely overrun the miniseries categories, it does not make sense to keep saying that the categories are for miniseries when miniseries are closer to the exception at this point.

    I appreciate that, Dylan.  I do seem to have two people who follow me around to one-star everything that I do.  Tom said that we should give the stars a chance when we were all attacking them when they were first implemented.  Has it been long enough yet?  Are Daniel’s two stars cause for concern for him?

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    Junk
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    #336089

    But I agree that it is unbelievable that Sherlock is submitting itself as a TV Movie.   

    I always felt like I was watching a proper film while watching Sherlock. So I’m least bothered by its inclusion there.

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    Somnambulist
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    #336090

    British series have a history of causing category confusion at the Emmys. In the 70s, Upstairs, Downstairs moved from Drama Series to Limited Series and back again (winning each time). In 1988, the British legal series Rumpole of the Bailey was moved from the Miniseries to Drama Series category (it had been nominated in the Limited Series category in 1981). I believe it was in the 1990s that feature-length installments of “series” such as Prime Suspect and Hornblower began to submit themselves as TV movies at the Emmys.

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    espnfan
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    #336091

    I don’t get why everybody is getting all upset that AHS and Fargo are submitting theirselves as a miniseries. They each have self contained storylines and have nothing in common (except for cast and crew) with other seasons. But I think they should rename the category Outstanding Limited Series

    But I agree that it is unbelievable that Sherlock is submitting itself as a TV Movie.   

    At first it bothered me that AHS switched over to the TV Movie/Mini-Series category, because that was an obvious ploy for awards.  I have accepted that and for the most part currently have no problem with AHS or Fargo claiming to be anthology series and submitting in TV Movie/Mini. 

    What bothers me now, or confuses me, is the fact a show like True Detective can do the same thing, and claim to be a dramatic series.  As opposed to anthology series.  It really should be one way or the other, but not both.  Or they should not have one set of rules for a certain show and different rules for another show. 

    In other words, if AHS and Fargo were considered mini-series because they have self-contained storylines, shouldn’t True Detective be considered one as well?  I kind of accepted TD in drama series as “it was what it was” but in the future some clarity would be nice from the academy.

     

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    espnfan
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    #336092

    I think they may also need to look at the rules regarding how many episodes constitute a season for a series.  My understanding is if you have six or more episdoes than you must submit as a series, comedy or drama.  It feels like it may be time to change that rule.

    Maybe it has always been this way, but it seems silly to me that a “mini-series” manages to have five or six more episodes than a regular “season” of television does.

    Honestly, I do not have the exact answer to this situation, but 10 episodes feels like the right amount to me.  It is kind of a crock that networks are now splitting “seasons” in half and submitting them for seperate eligibility periods at the Emmy awards (cough, cough AMC).  Maybe they need to institute a time frame where if your “season” airs more than 8/9 months aparts they are automatically considered seperate seasons.  And therefore if they do not have enough episodes to qualify as a regular series, they automatically get bumped down to TV Movie/Mini-Series.

    I do not know if that is a good idea or bad idea, but at least its a start. I understand the TV landscape is changing (at a tremendous pace) and welcome those changes, for the most part. I can appreciate “event series” and shorter seasons of cable and now broadcast TV.  Just like my post above, it would be nice to get a little more clarity on what exactly constitutes a television “season” as opposed to a mini-series.

    It kind of bothers me that we are now at a place where networks and creators can just pick and choose which category their shows fall into based on how many awards they can win, vs. the actual artistic merit of the work created. 

    Sorry if the above was confusing, hopefully it makes some sense. 

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    Somnambulist
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    #336093

    Don’t they also have a rule that a “created by” credit means a production can compete as a regular series, even if it is in fact a miniseries?

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    Marcus Dixon
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    #336094

    Somnambulist, I think that used to be a rule, but not anymore. Downton Abbey, AHS, Luther and Faro all have created by credits and were entered in mini/movie.

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